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Offal is a general term for any parts of the animal's innards which are not the conventional cuts from the muscle and bone. It would vary by cuisine, but could include liver, kidneys, heart, brains, stomach, or tongue. Those particularly fussy about what they eat might even extend it to things like tail and neck, although most wouldn't regard these as ...


5

Yes. Here's a specific example. Asian cuisine also has a strong tradition of using a wide variety of organ meats, many of which are considered delicacies. The bladder would be a particularly tough piece of protein to prepare, but you can make just about anything palatable with proper cleaning and a long braise.


2

You'll need a lot longer than 20 minutes that the recipe suggests. For cow tongue, we usually let them sit in a crock-pot for about 4hrs. My guess for lamb tongue is about 90 minutes on low simmer. The skin tends come loose from the muscle underneath when done. The best trick I've found is to cut the skin down the center of the tongue (lengthwise). Use a ...


2

In the US the closest thing you could (easily) get would be "Chitterlings" though this isn't quite correct since chitterlings are the small intestine, and tripa gorda is the large intestine.


2

You 'can' cook it from frozen, knowing that a few things will suffer. First, the outside will be somewhat dried out and over-cooked before it is done in the center, depending on how hot the oven is and the cooking time. That being said, if your Haggis is pre-cooked, it should be OK. You can also 'Hurry up ' the defrosting process by putting it under running ...


1

While not perhaps a definitive answer, according to Serious Eats: Besides its amazing flavor and texture, sweetbread is nearly impossible to overcook. [...] you can sear the exterior of sweetbread to your heart's content, without worrying about the interior turning chewy and tough. Your cooking timeframe, in other words, is extremely forgiving and ...


1

Just treat them as you would corned beef. I like the pressure cooker method


1

I would try simmering or braising until they are tender, which will make it easier to then skin them. Stewing them slowly, like you mentioned works well especially if you're making a soup.



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