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51

Fundamentally, the reason for this substitution is that applesauce contains pectin. In baking, the role of oil is to coat the flour, preventing it from combining with the water (or other wet ingredients) and developing gluten. Gluten is what causes dough to rise, and also gives elasticity to the final product - what most people think of as "chewiness." ...


40

The typical rule of thumb is that if it's a non-stick pan you do add a little oil to the pan first before heating. Most manufacturers usually recommend this to extend the life of the non-stick coating. For regular pans (those without non-stick coating) you should heat them dry until you can feel the radiating from the surface when your hand is held about ...


35

Yes, it is true that we don't add oil to the boiling water. I'm not aware of any good reason to waste extra-virgin olive oil that way! Some oil is always added at the end, over the sauce, when the pasta is already in the plate! It has to be raw, so that it retains its fruit nuances and texture. If you are doing cold pasta salad and want to avoid sticky ...


30

Actually, there are really only a few oils you can substitute for each other, at least without any significant side effects. The oils which generally are used interchangeably are peanut oil, canola/rapeseed oil, and sunflower oil. These oils have similar smoke points, don't impart any really noticeable flavour, and tend to be used primarily for high-heat ...


29

Never down the drain. We've had a few incidents in my neighborhood where the sewer pipes were clogged with fat, and a few people's basements flooded with sewage as a result. For fats that solidify, let them do so, then pitch them in your regular garbage. Chill grease in the fridge if you need to get it to harden up. For ones that don't solidify, pour them ...


29

That oils' smoke points can be generically classified solely according to their type is a myth. Robert Wolke, a professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and food columnist for the Washington Post, claims that the smoke point for an oil varies widely depending on origin and refinement. While the smoke point does generally increase ...


28

It is absolutely OK to filter and reuse deep-fry oil. It's not uncommon at some short-order restaurants for them to filter the oil daily and only change it once a week. Of course, it does start to taste a little "off" when you reuse it that many times. There's also the matter of impurities lowering the smoke point; even when you filter, the result is ...


27

"Commonly used" depends mostly on the culture, I'd assume. There's a lot of different oils, so I've organized by use rather than try for a complete list. Some of the ones that you might find in a "typical American" foodie's kitchen include: For frying: something with a high smoke point : peanut, sunflower, soy, extra light olive oil For baking (muffins ...


22

I think this is a problem with all oils. When something burns, it produces smoke. Smoke is generally indicative of something that isn't particularly good for us if inhaled. Same holds for oils. It seems that all oils will begin to produce toxins once they hit their smoke point. However, before that, they are completely fine. So pick an oil that will handle ...


19

In the US, "extra virgin" isn't a legally protected term - some of the stuff sold as EVOO here would never, ever pass as it elsewhere. From Wikipedia: Extra-virgin olive oil comes from virgin oil production only, contains no more than 0.8% acidity, and is judged to have a superior taste. Extra Virgin olive oil accounts for less than 10% of oil in many ...


18

Your cooking oil breaks down because of particulate that suspends in the oil as you cook in it. The ways that you can tell if the oil is bad is by visibility (at my restaurant we change at two inches but you could pull it sooner than that) and excessive smoking (because as noted above, particulate lowers smoke point and combustion point, and nobody wants to ...


18

Alton Brown covered this on an episode of Good Eats. There is a legitimate reason, and it has nothing to do with sticking; it's an anti-foaming agent, so you don't have to stir as much to keep down the foam you'll sometimes get. Any oil will work, it doesn't have to be the good stuff.


18

Butter and cooking oil are not interchangeable in every recipe. Butter actually has water in it, while oil is a pure lipid. This can cause problems with water-sensitive preparations, for example a choux paste (where the proper ratio of water to flour is extremely important) or anything using melted chocolate (where the water in butter can cause it to ...


18

I don't want to disappoint you, but the sad truth is that extra virgin olive oil is unsuitable for all the cooking methods you mention. When you heat any oil past its smoking point it starts to deteriorate and can even become dangerous. Olive oil, extra virgin in particular, has a lower smoking point than most other oils. In fact, you will be better off with ...


17

Oil is dry heat because oil contains no water. Wine does. The "moist" in moist heat really means water. In moist heat cooking, water acts as a solvent and actually dissolves much of the solid matter in the food - hence the reason why steaming and boiling tend to make food rather soft or even soggy. Oil, on the other hand, is very rarely a solvent. There ...


17

Donuts are a deep fried food. The texture of deep fried food is unique and cannot be duplicated by other methods. If you bake doughnut dough, you will get small rolls, which will have a similar aroma, but not the same combination of moist, soft inside and fat-crispy outside. You could bake it, as with any other yeast dough, only nobody will recognize it as a ...


15

The major difference between butter and oil is that butter is only 80% oil, with the rest being milk solids and water (source). This means that using oil you will lose some of the water content that your cake should have, possibly resulting in a dryer cake. On the plus side, cakes made with oil tend to dry out slower than those made with butter. The other ...


15

Very simple: don't burn the oil. Different fats start to burn at different temperatures (called "smoke point"). This can be as low as ~100°C for unrefined vegetable oils. Butter is also low, at around ~150°C, which is below frying temperatures. Refined vegetable oils have very differentn smoke points depending on the plant they were made from, some ...


15

Congratulations, you accidentally made allioli, a Catalan emulsified sauce requiring only garlic and olive oil to thicken and emulsify. Unfortunately, it's harder to make and less stable than the other aiolis (garlic mayonnaises), which include egg yolks as emulsifiers. This is probably why you are having difficulty replicating it. To make it more ...


15

There are two parts to this question, the stated part, and the unstated "are you really frying an egg if there is no oil?" For the first part, most manufacturers of non-stick pans claim that their product makes oil unnecessary, and generally I've found that to be true. A little oil helps, but "necessary" might be a stretch. To maximize your non-stickyness ...


15

Oil or fat is absolutely not necessary to cook rice. I suspect you may have been taught the pilaf method where the rice is first sauteed in oil or butter, and then liquid is added and the rice is fully cooked. The purpose of the pilaf method is to add depth of flavor. When making pilafs, additional herbs, spices, or aromatics (such as onions) are often ...


14

Always heat the oil with the pan. Heating pans dry damages the pans (especially non-stick ones). Also, there are no warning signs that the pan is hot when you set something else on it or bump into it. Adding cold ingredients to hot pans also damages the pan, and can scald the ingredients. Even oil. If you guessed too hot, you can damage several things ...


14

It's very important to consider smoke point. If you're using it in a high heat application, make sure that the oil you choose won't burn. Besides that, make sure the people eating your food won't be allergic to the oil you choose, for example peanut.


14

The boiling point of most cooking oils is much higher than their smoke points. The boiling point of olive oil, for example, is around 300°C (572°F), which is hotter than the temperature of a pan on a typical residential range/cooktop. With that said, alcohols and esters which make up the flavor and fragrance of the oil will have lower boiling points and ...


14

The coating you are talking about is potato starch that is browning on the bottom of the pan, similar to what happens to roux when it is prepared. If you deglaze the pan using alcohol, it will come right off without any effort (water works too, though more is needed). As for how to get the potatoes not to stick, it's important that the pan and the oil are ...


13

There are a great many oils and fats on the market, which you choose to use will largely depend on several factors: Type of cuisine being prepared Health considerations Flavour profile required The most common oils are probably Olive oil - This is a great oil for preparing a whole variety of foods, it's also great in salads. It typically comes in four ...


13

1 - Oil is separated in curries normally after you have cooked spices or sauces for ~10-15 mins. You can tell by seeing "bubbles" appearing and the oil by making a thin layer on top of your sauces/curry. 2 - It varies, but normally after 10-15 mins the oil separates from your curry. 3 - Normally after cooking for 10-15 mins most of the water dries up which ...


13

Indian food is commonly cooked with ghee (clarified butter), for both religious and flavor reasons. Where ghee is not used, coconut or refined palm oil are common. I can also tell you from experience that Indian food can be made with unflavored vegetable oils (canola, sunflower or soy), without a deleterious effect on flavor or texture.


13

Olive oil has a notoriously low smoke point. If you're looking for something nutritious to pop corn with, try avocado oil. While burned food tastes yucky, and there is (some) evidence that a steady diet consisting mainly of burnt olive oil may be (slightly) carcinogenic, it is highly unlikely you did anything worse than ruin your munchies.


13

There are three major properties an edible fat (I am assuming you are not asking about inedible oils like petroleum based products) has that affect how it is best used: Flavor Saturation Smoke point Properties Flavor The flavor of the fat is very important. So called neutral oils (like canola oil or refined grapeseed oil, or refined peanut oil, among ...



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