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If the container is labelled with one of the standard logos that mark an unconditionally food safe container, there should be no concern: Used peanut oil is still food, so a container specified to deal with food should deal with it too. If not, assume that the container has only been designed to be safe with the exact, unaltered ingredient shipped in it ...


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As far as food safety goes, it should be safe to refry food with it (after all, you are heating this up to ~400 F again, bacteria stands no chance) The filtering helps on the flavor department. As food particles/breadings fall off, they burn and impart a burnt flavor. If you reuse oil with much burnt parts, the burnt flavors will come through lot quicker. ...


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I would reuse it. IMHO it's more a matter of how many times you reuse it than how you store it in between. You can filter through a paper towel if you want to.


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Given the restrictions you've provided, as far as I can tell the only thing you eat that could possibly take on a decent amount of oil without being obviously greasy is mashed or pureed vegetables, either on their own or as part of a pureed soup. For example, any starchy vegetable (potatoes, winter squash, carrots, etc) can take up a decent amount of oil ...


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Debating health is off topic here, but I think I can answer some of your question. Since you mentioned Chow Mein. I would start by saying that technically speaking you can NOT cook Chow Mein without oil. Chow directly translates to "fried" and Mein translates to "noodle". As frying (even stir/wok/pan frying in this case) by definition requires oil... Now, ...


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Oil (olive in particular) has been in use for at least 8000 thousand years (according to wikipedia) around the Mediterranean (Greece, Palestine...) So it has been used for a long time. Before that and from other parts of the world, people used animal fat, either pork fat or goat fat (or whatever animals were around). Butter has also been used for a long ...


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I'm going to only answer the bit about oils in cooking, rather than all the uses of oil in the kitchen. When frying or sautéing, oil acts in several capacities: First, and most critically, the oil in a pan conducts heat from the hot pan to the food being cooked. The oil greatly increases the surface are of the food in contact with heat, rather than have ...


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If you are properly deep frying, you should never allow the oil to get to the point it burns. Commercial fryers are temperature controlled to maintain a consistent temperature. If you are frying in a pan, it is the duty of the cook to monitor the oil and ensure that the burner setting is lowered, if you the temperature of the oil gets too high.


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Commercial deep fryers are controlled by thermostats so that they are kept at a controlled temperature electronically and can be left on more or less indefinitely. By contrast if you just put a pan full of oil on a hob you have some control over the heat input but there is no automated feedback mechanism to regulate the temperature and so it is quite hard ...


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The answers attesting to commercial equipment thermostat control are correct. But, it's also about the oil. You didn't say what oil you use at home. Restaurants typically use fryer oil with a smoke point in the mid-400's F. For cooking, they set the thermostat in the 375 F range, well below the smoke point. Maybe you have the wrong oil and/or using too ...


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Restaurants have the right tools and equipment for deep frying. I would agree that they also have massive exhaust fans to keep the smoke down. They also have the right equipment to do mass quantities of food. They have a special deep fry station, where they have gallons of the correct oil and at the right temperature. Here size or quantity of oil ...


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It is a combination of a few factors. I doubt they turn off the heat on their deep fryers when not in use Some do it. There are small deep fryers which have the capacity for one portion of fries, and bistros and restaurants where you sit down and wait for your order to be prepared turn them off during lull times. They take some minutes to heat up, ...


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Restaurants have massive fans. Commercial deep fryers have temperature control. Example temperature control unit: And massive heating elements (notice 4 temperature controls): Massive heating elements allows for even delivery of heat. When you drop frozen fish it has to kick out some heat but it is careful not to get too hot via temperature ...


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I probably do it all wrong or completely unprofessionally, but here it is: I use microfiber cloths (silk before microfiber became available), so they don't leave any filaments or lint on the food. Then I rinse my microfiber cloths in an ice cream bucket full of hot, soapy water with Dawn antibacterial dish soap (the kind they use to take oil off of animals), ...



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