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2

My sprayer never clogs. I put my dried herbs & peppercorns in a small cheese cloth bundle. No debris from the spices and aromatic oil with every spray. I too clean my unit with inexpensive alcohol such as rum or vodka, every 6 weeks. I stay away from water, for cleaning, it tends to spoil the oil over a short amount of time.


0

For cornbread you can use butter as a substitute. If you are using salted butter reduce the salt in the recipe somewhat to compensate for the salt in the butter.


4

Peanut oil is fine to use for vegetable oil. Since both are neutral with a high smoke point, they can be used interchangeably.


1

Can't say that I've done this, but what about creating an absorbent ring by rolling a piece of paper towel into several layers and securing it to the top of the bottle with a rubber band? That way any drips would be soaked up. Cheap, easy, replaceable.


2

I've worked in a couple kitchens, one of the better methods I saw involved snagging a used pour bottle from the bar, cleaning it out and using that for oil. Something like imaged, with the right-sized bottle. Because it has separate tubes for liquid and gas, you usually pour out only what you need. The trick here is that is sounds like you use as little ...


1

I don't own such a bottle and thus can't try it myself, but probably the following method works. While standing upright, squeeze some air out of the bottle. Keep it squeezed while adding the desired amount of oil to your dish. Loosen your grip to let the air flow back into the bottle, and simultaneously tilt it back upright. The thought behind this is ...


0

Not really except to clean the outside after use. Choice of nozzle can help, but due to the Viscosity coupled with the LACK of skin effect, you'll always get a little bit on the edge even if it's a quarter drop and it will slowly drip down the side. So...really all you can do is keep it clean.


1

I have another solution: you could use grapeseed oil instead. It doesn't solidify when refridgerated. It's what I use for all my dressing needs :)


0

You could fry it off with your veg base, remove it, make your soup and then add the chorizo to serve. Boiling chorizo is just a bit of a waste


0

If you want to reduce sticking and crusting try rinsing your rice before cooking to release any excess starch. You may be surprised at the results.


2

It depends on the recipe but, clarifying butter removes fat, milk, sugar, etc from the butter. Leaving a pure (clean) product. Clarifying it will remove any likelyhood of contamination (spoilage) and will reduce separation. Try cooking green beans (or any veggie) in a pot with water and add a significant amount of butter, then put it in the fridge ...


3

Pros: Higher smoking point. Regular butter's smoking point is 325-375F while clarified butter is around 485F. But it can still smoke and burn! However the higher smoking point means it'll be much more applicable in terms of sauteing food without worrying about burning the butter. 100% fat. Often times its hard to calculate the exact replacements in baking ...



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