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0

I've been making cornbread for decades, and quit using oil at all about 20 years ago. Corn meal, flour, a little sugar, rising agents, salt, milk, an egg... It comes out fine. A little bacon fat can make it tastier.


1

I can't say for sure, but it's possible that it's simply achieved through temperature -- olive oil will solidify in your refrigerator. (I make basil infused olive oil, which I then keep in the fridge. You have to keep it in a jar so you can extract it, because it won't pour at fridge temps)


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Olive oil contains a certain percentage of saturated fats, which are probably separated out and used. Alternatively, there is a process called interestification that is sometimes used to make more solid forms of non-solid fats without hydrogenation.


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Flavored oils are a low-acid anaerobic (no air) environment. Herbs add a moisture source and can allow botulism bacteria to grow. Even if herbs are removed from the oil after infusing for a brief period, they may have already contaminated the remaining oil with botulism toxin and/or allow small pieces of herbs to remain where the bacteria can grow. ...


2

Basic answer: it's generally recommended to sterilize jars before storing low-acid foods at room temperature. (Many canning procedures effectively sterilize the jars during processing.) In your case, you should be certain the jars are clean and thoroughly dry as well. Regarding your overall proposal: I'd only give away food gifts like this if I had ...


1

I see no reason not to flip between those choices willy-nilly. They are all fairly neutral, largely unsaturated, relatively high-smoke-point oils. That makes them pretty much interchangeable, and good for shallow frying, deep frying, baking (when unsaturated is desired), and uncooked applications. I generally keep one bottle of oil that fits that ...


1

Ratios of saturated/monounsaturated/polyunsaturated fats, and ratios of which kind of polyunsaturated (omega-3/6/7/9) are different for each oil. While the ratio of polyunsaturated fats to each other will mostly be a health matter and out of scope here, the saturated/mono/poly ratio has an influence on consistency at a given temperature (eg the coconut oil ...


5

In Britain the two most common vegetable oils are Sunflower oil and Rapeseed Oil. Sunflower oil has a smoke point of over 400F, and Rapeseed oil similar, assuming both are refined which is almost always the case as sold in supermarkets. Rapeseed is reported to have higher omega-3s than Sunflower oil so is increasingly popular, but Sunflower oil is very ...


7

In Canada "Vegetable Oil" is generally taken as 100% unblended canola/rapeseed oil Refined canola oil has a smoke point of 400F, according to: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/collectedinfo/oilsmokepoints.htm You can choose from that chart any of the oils that fit your temperature range, and provide the degree of flavouring you desire.


0

"Vegetable oil", in the US, generally means canola oil (aka rapeseed oil). (In many cases, of course, you could substitute another neutral oil with a similar smoke point, if canola isn't available.)


6

I looked to the wiki I've been maintaining on translating between English dialects, but I realized that the 'yellow squash' distinction was a bit muddled in there: Summer Squash (US) are members of the squash family with a short storage life typically harvested before full maturity; typically available starting in the spring and summer; includes zucchini, ...


12

Peanut (groundnut) oil is a great option. In the US vegetable oil generally means soybean oil or a soybean oil blend. The main things are that it be neutral (little or no taste of its own), with a high smoke point. On those scores, you can't do much better than peanut oil. I have not used rice bran oil. Yellow squash generally means this: (the long ...


4

"Seasoning" on non-stick pans is quite different from seasoning on older frying pans made of things like cast iron or carbon steel. For something like cast iron, you are trying to create a durable coating of polymerized oil, essentially a "non-stick layer" of burnt oil. That process of seasoning can require a lot more effort and specific steps. Your ...


2

I am just now trying the whole "essential oil made at home" thing, so came across your post, and thought I would add a couple of things (even though your post is old): (1) try putting the remaining "oil" in the freezer to see if the natural oil that was extracted from the lemon rind will separate further from the rest of the liquid (be it vodka or water, or ...


1

Depends on the oil, when we infuse like to think of it as steeping not boiling or heating to the point of just below the smoke point as the spices will cook and not infuse, some will also become bitter. I also suggest you put your chilis in all at once or toward the end of the infusion process if you are layering the flavor or want a less intense flavor. ...


0

There is a thing called powdered shortening or you can get powdered butter. They are just add water products that you can put in a recipe like that and it will work fine.



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