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24

Eggs are already 3/4 water anyway! By mixing in a small quantity of extra water before you cook the eggs, you are slowing down the cooking process by making more water available that has be evaporated. This keeps the cooking temperature to less than 100°C (212°F) for longer, therefore increasing the the time for the egg proteins to foam and expand before ...


22

This depends on which type of omelet you want to make, I'll run through the three types I know how to make. The thick Waffle House style omelet (it's the kind that poofs up and is about an inch thick all the way around, IHOP also serves this omelet) is achieved by beating the eggs and incorporating a LOT of air in to the mixture. Restaurants do this by ...


11

One thing I haven't seen mentioned yet that I find makes all the difference is this: I put the eggs in a bowl of warm water for 5 mins or so before I crack and blend them. Cold eggs tend to get rubbery when they hit the hot pan. I also use clarified butter (ghee), and I ALWAYS keep a LOW heat. After gently pouring the eggs in, I let it just sit for a minute ...


7

I can't say much for how professionals would do this, but I have found just about the quickest omelette is the Julia Child (French) version of one. By her method, you cook the eggs (mixed with just a bit of water) over fairly high heat in a bit of melted butter, shaking the pan the whole time. At the end, you jerk the pan to get the eggs to roll up on ...


6

I don't know about contests, but I have in the past cooked 200 omlettes in just over half an hour. We used three pans working in parallel. Get the pans as hot as you can. Use oil, not butter, so you don't have to wait for it to melt each time. Pre-beat all the eggs together in advance. After that, it's just a tablespoon of oil and a ladle of eggs. Flip ...


6

There isn't a standardised shape as such, but the rugby ball shape is common. To achieve this shape, all you have to do is cook your omelette (French style uses a super-hot pan and lots of butter), then roll three quarters of it up in the pan. Then nudge the omelette up the side of the pan a little, so that it partly protrudes over the edge, which will ...


5

Another effective method (not mentioned in the link SAJ14SAJ provided) is salting. Dice the tomatoes, generously salt them and leave them in a sieve for 20 minutes or so. You probably want to squeeze off some of the juicy bits first. Flip the tomatoes half-way through the resting time. That will draw off a lot of water without pre-cooking the tomatoes (which ...


5

I have had the same issue when cooking lots of quesadillas, and have found the following combination of techniques to work quite well. The obvious answer has been hit upon already, lower the heat. But I think that's missing an important aspect of the issue. What's happening is most likely that you are turning on the heat and then cooking your first omelet ...


5

Cover it! The secret to omelette not having a runny middle, and being able to handle it without it breaking is to use a loose fitting lid (or another pan, upside down) as a cover for most of, if not all of the initial cooking This in effect steams the top of the egg, ensuring it is cooked before the bottom burns This also increases the fluffiness of the ...


5

You shouldn't use boiled potatoes as you have to fry them. This is a good recipe, and no, tomatoes are not part of "authentic" Spanish omelette. In Spain we call it "Potato omelette" an the only ingredients are eggs, potatoes, olive oil, salt and sometimes onion.


5

I usually make open omelette which can be a bit trickier but my technique always works perfectly so maybe it would help you as well. First I melt around 1 teaspoon butter and I spread the beaten eggs in the pan with a spoon. I put the lid on and let it cook over very low heat until it's almost cooked all over (around 5 minutes). To flip, I let it slide to ...


4

The technique I used to use was to lift up the edges and tilt the pan very slightly, to move the uncooked egg out to the sides. This worked pretty well in the sense that it didn't break or burn, but didn't produce that perfectly smooth omelet. The technique I use today is to simply use the bottom of a fork and make circular motions across the surface to ...


4

When I have very fresh and very ripe tomatoes, I don't like to cook them as their structure breaks down with heat and quickly becomes grainy. Another option in addition to others' wonderful recommendations is just to prep the tomatoes separately. Peel them by blanching and shocking them so the skin comes apart, split, and scoop out the seeds. Dice, and add ...


3

Judging from search results and the handy firefox babelfish addon, the peasant (or country-style) omelette seems to be, as you suspected, one of those dishes where anything handy is thrown in. EDIT: the firefox addon is actually unnecessary as google provides an option on the search results page for translated versions of the search results.


3

So I was thinking about this, and realized that there are plenty of egg dishes that work well out of the refrigerator, but the thing is, you don't reheat them, you serve them at room temperature: quiche fritatta pizza rustica tortilla (the spanish dish, not the south american item of the same name) I mean, it's not going to be the exact same as making it ...


3

I'm pretty happy with the way I make my omelets so here is the way I do it. I usually make very small omelets and they cook for no more than 45-60 second on a very hot plate. I use either one or two eggs. The result is a pretty wet and "runny" omelet, but I think they taste delicious. take one or two ROOM temperature eggs (not directly from fridge) and ...


3

BC, While I love Rumtscho's highly chemical theory above and will probably use it to explain why my own cooking doesn't look right in the future, I have a more mundane explanation, based you the information you omitted from your original question (bad submitter!): Kraft Philadelphia. I mixed the cheese, the other day, with walnut, hazelnut and chive. ...


3

Bubbles on top while cooking - If you beat air into your eggs before you pour, air would naturally come to the surface. Develop tunnels - The only explanation I have for this is that you didn't beat the eggs enough, and the mixture was not homogenous. But based on the physical characteristic of bubbles, it would seem that you did beat the eggs, so I'm not ...


2

I find that this exquisitely instructional video about how to make an omelet is a great way to start. You may try at least 2 techniques to cook the omelet faster. They do have disadvantages in the result that you will get. Starting from here, in order to cut down the cooking time, you will need to use a larger pan / fewer eggs so that you only get a a ...


2

Tortilla de patatas can be mixed with some other vegetables in order to make some varieties (for example: tortilla campera). But I've never seen a tortilla with carrots, although I understand you need to cook somewhere those carrots. I'd love to know how it looks and tastes! ;) If you add carrots, make sure carrots are at least a bit cooked before adding to ...


2

If you would like to add carrots, make sure you cut them small enough (since it takes quite a while to get them soft). I'm not 100% sure it would be a good fit, but that's up to you. You certainly can make a tortilla in the oven, I've done so in a spring form. I think I did it for about 45 min in an oven of 180°C/350°F. But this depends of course on how ...


2

To minimize the uncooked egg, as soon as the egg starts to set, use a spatula to push the edges away from the sides of the pan. Tilt the pan to drain some of the uncooked egg into the gap. Continue doing this along the edges as uniformly as possible, until the majority of the runny eggs in the middle are gone. The process of pushing the edges towards ...


2

I have a theory about your omelette (and sadly, no means to test it). But I think it is plausible, please feel free to point out logical errors. I think that the unappetizing coloring is due to the creation of sulfur salts in your pan. Egg whites are rich in sulfur, as are all alliums (including chives). If you heat them enough (you don't mention whether ...


2

Being grown in Spain I've eaten boiled potatoes Spanish omelette a few times: when my mother wasn't in aim for cleaning the splattered oil after cooking. She stopped making omelettes that way: it simply didn't have the taste it should have. IMHO potatoes should be deep fried in olive oil as that will give them a crust/scratching outer part with an inside ...


2

Lots of butter (actually, I use Smart Balance, wife=nurse, what can I say), medium heat, very think coating of egg. I make my eggs simply as 1 egg + 1 tbl.spoon water, whisk. Teflon rounded edge pan. No flipping over, just flip up the sides over the center to cover chesse, ham, etc. added on top when just starting to dry out.


2

Like Kyra said, I use butter (somewhat liberal amounts) in a Teflon pan before pouring the egg. Make sure the pan is to temperature before pouring the eggs in. It helps if the eggs are at room temperature. The eggs should bubble fairly soon after pouring, 10-15 seconds. That helps to make sure the omelette is cooked without burning. The right size pan ...


2

A French-style no-flip omelette can also be made without needing to pull the egg toward the center with a fork. For many years, the top hit for "omelette" on Google was Pineapple Girl's omelette recipe, which is quite easy to make, and has a special addition over the traditional French omelette: a delicious, crispy filigree of egg around the border. The ...


2

Microwaved eggs was probably one of the first things that I learned to cook -- I don't know I'd consider it an 'omlette' necessarily -- it was just a bowl, oiled, broke an egg in it, a touch of milk or water, mixed, and then microwaved. When you're rushing to get out the door in the morning, it's a dead simple breakfast; I was recently out of town, and the ...



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