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-4

I have bin a chef for 35 years & have never seen slime like this on any of the thousands of green onion i have prepared until today .& anyone that tells me this is normal is lying,slime has bin & always will be a sign that the food is not eatable . In my opinion this is another product of food engineering (AKA: G.M.O) & that is something that ...


1

Blanching is a common technique for making firmer vegetables and fruits that will be later go through other preparation steps, such as being placed in a stew or pickled. But it is a tricky process, because you want to be in the temperature range where an enzyme turns on (opposite of what the quote from indiacurry in another answer states). The reason is ...


4

From indiacurry.com : Blanching Vegetables for freezing or pickling Vegetables have a natural enzyme that continues to effect texture, color and flavor. Blanching stops the enzyme action The natural enzymes help vegetable to grow and mature until they are harvested. After the vegetables have been harvested, they continue to remain active even ...


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It's likely a matter of taste. Why not do a little experiment? Blanch half, pickle all, keep track of which is which, taste, report back.


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As others have said here, butter isn't required. The browning and good flavour come from the maillard reaction: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction You can use oil instead of butter, though the flavour will probably be a little different. You can also add a little baking soda, as the increased pH will increase the maillard reaction, which gives ...


3

Onion can be caramelized without butter. Or any other type of oil. However, unless you are actively avoiding using fat, there really is no reason not to. The main benefit of using oil when caramelizing onion is the fact that oil can reach a higher temperature than water. To caramelize onion you need to reach about 230F. Water boils at 212F and will not go ...


1

No, you don't need butter to caramelize onions because they are very very sweet, and the sugar inside of them is what become brown as you caramelize your onions. They do however get pretty sticky since you are basically creating caramel, so if you're not using butter, you should use some oil, or have a very nonstick pan, or you will struggle trying to ...


2

Butter is not necessary. In fact, you can caramelize without any fat. The browning of the sugars in the product is what creates caramelization. To caramelize without fat, chop or slice onion, place in pan with a little salt. Cover and cook at medium for about 5 minutes. Uncover and cook any water out. Stir often. Deglaze the pan with a bit of water. ...


1

If the mortar size vs volume of ingredients is truly the only concern, you can crush things in batches and mix them in a bowl afterwards. :-) I think the main reason for adding them into a prepared paste is for convenience in adding that paste to recipes later. If it has everything you need already in it, then it works better as a base. If it doesn't have ...


0

Try this recipe. The chicken and onion can be added in Step 3, but I'm still unsure of what the use of potato bread would be, whether it would be mixed in the inside the filling, or as a component or replacement for the doughy outside.


2

Onions contain proteolytic enzymes, just like honey and certian fruits, which makes them ideal to help tenderize meat. They are a common veggies low in calories and are a common state in many cuisines around the world. One prime example is a dish from Japan known as Chaliapin Steak. Which is a dish where you score the meat(make grid lines), pound the beef, ...



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