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12

Orange zest is where most of the oil is. This can be removed with a grater and some patience, or a peeler if you have a light touch, but the best way is a zester. They are fairly expensive and only do one thing, but they are the best tool for the job. Mircoplane makes a nice line, and I have no complains about mine. You want to avoid scraping the white pith ...


7

For special guests you can 'segment' citrus, but I've always found it a thankless chore that wastes a lot of fruit, so I don't undertake the process lightly. This process is especially nice if you are using the citrus in something like a dessert or salad where the texture of the tough membrane can throw off the dish. However, as is the case with a citrus ...


7

Sure, you can juice with a blender, as long as (a) the blender is of reasonably good quality and (b) you're not expecting the same kind of yield or quality you'd get with a juicer (electric or manual). You'll also need a very fine strainer, or cheesecloth if you're like me and hate any amount of pulp. You'll have to peel them first, and try to remove the ...


7

The best way to remove wax from citrus is simply to wash it with dish soap under warm, running water. Don't obsess about how long you should wash the fruit; usually the wax application is very thin and quickly removed. There is no easy way to tell whether you have removed the wax, so if you return citrus to fridge after removing the wax, you might want to ...


7

There is unlikely to be any single answer to my question since the coating can be any one of a number of substances including, Natural or synthetic resins Carnauba wax Shellac Tall oil Paraffin Oxidised polyethylene Candelilla wax Beeswax Corn, soy or milk proteins These may be disolved in a petroleum based solvent, emulsified with a detergent or ...


5

you know better than I do, it depends on the orange and type of orange. My mom, an executive chef, used to say that you'd allow 1-2 lb of oranges for 1 drinkable cup of orange juice. I really think, that it's highly dependent on the type of orange. I know naval and blood oranges are the juiciest compared to other varieties.


5

I've made a similar cake before - note that it uses clementines, not just any oranges. This is an advantage because their skin is thinner and less bitter than larger oranges. The cooking softens the peel enough to puree smoothly, and helps release the orange flavor from the peel. It's not really about reducing biterness; some of the bitter flavor may be ...


5

Whole fresh oranges, refrigerated, should last 1-2 months per Eat By Date. You can freeze orange peels (or any citrus) very successfully. When you have a sufficient quantity, you might choose to candy them, which should last at least several weeks if stored in a cool, dry environment, probably months if well dried as part of the candying process. You can ...


5

Speaking of dehydration, it is possible to dry out a piece of orange peel. If you do it properly so it does not rot or get moldy, it will last for years, although it will gradually use its aroma. The problem is that it will shrink when dehydrating, resulting in a worse-looking surface and possibly distorting the signature. A largish section is also ...


5

I'm from the garden/landscape section of the site, but post your question there anyway, regardless of my answer - you may get a better/different one! Navel oranges, technically, are parthenocopic, which means they produce fruit without fertilisation, and that's why they are seedless. However, if the blossom is pollinated by a suitable donor, then seeds may ...


5

The skin is the outer thick orange-coloured cover; obviously as you're not told to remove it this would include the pith (the white fibrous material) as well. The pips are the seeds inside the fruit: pip noun plural noun: pips 1. a small hard seed in a fruit. synonyms: seed, stone, pit


4

Orange oil. It also comes in lemon and lime - it's far more concentrated then extracts.


4

Triple Sec, Grand Marnier, or Blue CuraƧao


4

Another option: confit the orange peel in a mix of vegetable oil and white wine, say for 30 minutes at 200F. This peel could then go in closer to the end of when your cooking as its going to be soft and more edible directly.


4

Depends on how fine you have shaved the rind/zest, you can consider candying it (boil it in syrup till it become very transparent) or dip it in chocolate after candying it. if it is too fine, then add it into your next chocolate recipe to get orange-flavoured chocolate....


4

A medium sized orange will have roughly 2 oz of juice.


4

First I would recommend viewing the episode of Good Eats, Orange Aid. While there is not a direct answer to your question Alton does talk about getting the maximum orange flavor as well as how to avoid the pithy flavor. (This link to Orange Aid will take you to Amazon Prime, where if you are not an Amazon Prime member you may purchase for $2.99...) The take ...


3

The problem you are presenting is that "all fruit" that can be juiced covers a lot of ground. Nearly all fruit has some parts that need to be discarded, but it varies by fruit. As you noted, for oranges (and grapefruit, and lemons, and tangerines) it is the peel. For apples and pears, it is the peel and the core. For apricots and peaches, the pit. And ...


3

I like the OXO good grips citrus juicer. It has a reamer for fruit the size of orange which flips over for smaller fruit such as lemons. I think it beats a wooden hand reamer because it holds the juice and filters out seeds. No peeling is necessary. It's manual, but I think that is easy.


3

I usually cut all of the rind off. Then quarter the orange, cut out the seeds by cutting the inner corner out of the quarters. Then slice into as many pieces as desired. This leaves a little bit of the fiber on the orange, but nothing you have to remove before eating. It's slow the first time, but with practice, it can be done very quickly.


3

You want to get your flavor from the rind, not the juice. It's full of flavorful oils. The best way to do this in your case is probably to make your own orange zest by using a fine grater (I love my Microplane for this) and adding the zest to your sauce while cooking. Be sure to only use the outermost layer of the rind; the white part is the pith, and is ...


3

One way to get more juice from citrus is to juice it when warm. Cold fruit doesn't release as much juice. I put a skewer hole in my citrus (for safety issues) and then microwave the fruit for 20=30 seconds before cutting and juicing. I'm also partial to Valencia oranges for juice.


3

The amount of juice you get from an orange will depend on a number or things: Size of the orange Juice content of the orange Whether you use the pulp or remove all the bits May be you should be asking what oranges are best for producing the most amount of juice and how do I get the most juice from them? The easiest way to find out how many oranges you ...


3

I'm not as familiar with citrus, but tomatoes and peppers can develop something called blossom-end rot. This is caused by the plant not receiving enough nutrients (specifically calcium), whether b/c the plant isn't getting enough water and thus can't get the nutrients out of the soil or b/c the soil is deficient. Regarding whether it's safe to eat, a ...


3

The white, pithy part is a source of the bitterness. Either peel more thoroughly, or trim off with a knife. The pulp of some oranges (of the navel variety), can turn bitter when exposed to air. http://www.preparedpantry.com/CitrusQuickGuide.htm


2

Some options would be: orange peel as a spice, orange juice concentrate, and orange extract (probably not in your local grocery store, but you can order it).


2

Basically, you have two types of fruit for juicing: Those with a rind (lemon, orange, grapefruit) and those without (strawberries, grapes, apples, etc). Non-rind fruits: Wash and use a vitamix (blender). Turn it into juice and pulp. If you don't want the pulp, pass it through a sieve or chinois. For citrus, the best juicer I've used are the manual press ...


2

Well, it wouldn't cost much to figure it out! I'll try a guess, though, and say that it will make peeling MORE difficult. The peel will be stiffer, and I think the pith might be even more likely to stick to the orange flesh, and maybe less likely to stick to the outer peel. But I'd like to know what your results are if you test it. I'd say if you're having ...



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