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3

There aren't any very good "rules of thumb" for specific temperatures or cooking times. I'll take a stab at the question in general terms, but it really will vary depending on the specific dishes. There are other questions which have been asked here that ask about specific cases. First, timing and temperature are separate issues. The general answer ...


0

I've had to use a broiler drawer for the first time over the past few months and it's driving me nuts!!! So much more inconvenient than an in oven broiler.


1

it's safe, and if it's dry (probably is) I'd try making BBQ out of it - pull it apart with forks or fingers, as pulled BBQ meat is always better, then simmer on very low in a lot of BBQ sauce. You can freeze portions of the meat for later, just add sauce and simmer when you want it.


2

Your brisket was undercooked, not overcooked. At the temperatures you stated, rule of thumb for brisket cooking time is about 1.25-1.5 hours per pound. Convection may drop that down a tad. A 7.5 pound brisket should be cooked for at least 8 hours, and could be closer to 10 or so. The cuts of meat that are designated as "barbecue" meats are generally full of ...


-1

Wagyu it not anything special comparing to other grass feed cattle, it's just more fat marbled. So if you like that, then it's great The increased marbling is mostly in the top cuts, and not so much in the bottom cuts like brisket, so Wagyu cross breed cattle isn't going to make that much difference for this Your technique seems overly complex! Just cook ...


3

It is safe to eat, but not safe to serve. Elaboration: Depending on your general cleanliness, there shouldn't be enormous amount of bacteria in the roasts: anything above 100°C (200°F) for an hour is sterilised and if you keep your pans and oven clean (with pyrolysing ovens: easy to do nowadays) it is perfectly safe for you, the dogs, the cat, and any other ...


0

I own a business that services industrial ovens and Furnaces. and have been doing this for 0ver 30 years Your basic "home"oven is a true convection oven as was pointed above. The fan assisted oven (AKA mechanical convection oven) has airflow that increases the temperature accuracy up to 5-10 degrees in some instances as well as supplying greater ...


1

When you ask "can I put it in the oven?" you're actually not asking a whole question. Can you put it in the oven? Of course you can. Will anything happen to it and your food that you don't like? Ah, that is the other half, right? What might happen? the pan might warp (if it is thin) the food might scorch or burn (again, more likely if the pan is thin) the ...


0

Only if you are cooking something in it. That's a pretty high temp and your stainless is going to get stained.


6

First off, there is a way bakers measure the proportions of ingredients that is pretty unique to bread—everything is measured relative to the amount of flour by weight. A ratio of 0.6 (or 60%) means if you use 10oz of flour, you use 6oz of that other ingredient. There are typical ranges for these. For example, salt will typically be 1–2%, yeast (depending ...


0

There is one large con which probably does not affect all brands. I have frequently heard of combos which have a mode which is labeled as "convection only" but they do not turn the microwave off. The results are clearly like microwaved food, and thus they are unsuitable for baking. I cannot tell you the exact brands and models which have this problem, but ...


1

I notice that the recipe calls salt optional. Have you been using the tablespoon of salt? If not, I recommend you add it. Salt controls the fermentation rate of the yeast and strengthens the gluten protein. Bread made without it will be dense, with a very hard crust. Otherwise, it sounds like your dough isn't receiving a long enough rise, or you may have ...


1

Edited; expanding on answer. The two most common issues for bread is not enough water and not enough proofing. Although there are many ways to get there it all revolves around not having enough CO2 in bread because of under-expansion. 90% of the time root causes is due to a lack of moisture during one of the steps... So dry or tough bread can be the ...


3

The linked question in comments makes some general points about dedicated pizza ovens. However, to address the final question about temperature differences, the general answer is that it depends on the style of pizza you'd prefer to make and the dough/topping characteristics. Some doughs and pizza styles are designed to be cooked at lower temperatures for ...


1

If your ham went directly from the refrigerator to oven then the ham's core temp would have been around 35-38 degrees. This would add significant cooking time and probably account for the 6-7 hour cook time at 275. I just cooked a fully cooked, bone in country ham that was 7.34 lbs. Before cooking I filled a large bowl with 110 degree water and submerged ...



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