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I think I have similar gas oven as you have.What I do is bake for some time from bottom till I see slight brownish bottom of bread/ bun then I switch to top gas burners( broiler) and bake. This is risky as the bun becomes brown very fast. Problem is the browning is not even and get some dark patches here and there. I will try keeping the bottom tray with ...


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Please correct me if I'm wrong, but if I've read your question correctly, you already have a toaster oven with a convection function and are considering options for replacing it. If that's the case, you know how convection cooking fits into your lifestyle, and when and why you like to use it. Hopefully I can help with one part of your question! We recently ...


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I would say it depends on what equipment you already have, and if you are willing to replace your (current?) microwave or oven. Also, do you have room for the convection microwave? It would have to be above your range, if you don't want it on the countertop anymore. Another factor would be what kinds of food you would cook - convection ovens are typically ...


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Short answer: Yes, but make sure to eat the pastry before the cream cheese spoils.


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A traditionally made jam is actually a preserve that has, by the copious amounts of sugar involved and often by natural acidity, some added resilience against spoilage compared to a random ingredient - the practically most encountered spoilage mode for jams is mold. A "diet" style jam that uses artificial sweeteners and no or little sugar could conceivably ...


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Yep. No problem at all. This is standard practise for using up left over pastry: jam tarts. Just be careful to let the jam cool down before you bite into it. You don't want molten jam all over the roof of your mouth.


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Should be safe to heat your jam. I have reheated jams over the stove but never in the oven and have not encountered any problems with it. It is always safe to reheat your jam. Reasons for reheating jams may vary, but be warned: "they may or may not form a gel again once they are re-heated, as over-cooking of pectin can reduce or destroy its ability to form ...


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Sure it's safe, there's no risk in putting jam in baked goods. It says refrigerate after opening so it doesn't spoil after being left out too long - some people don't realize it needs to be refrigerated after opening because it is stored in the cupboard before opening. The important thing for food safety is to make sure that the pastries are eaten soon ...


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No there is no reason why a well-built oven can't go higher then 500°F: my German-built Bosch oven has: a pyrolytic self-cleaning program that goes to 480°C (896°F), and even the hardest stains get reduced to a mere sprinkling of white dust the grill goes up to 350°C (662°F) which will make a perfect gratin in less then a minute, but which will burn the ...


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They do go above 550F, it's a question of design and the type of wiring used in an oven. THWN is commonly used to wire up home ovens, which has a maximum surrounding ambient temperature rating of 105 degrees celsius. So, oven makers need to design ovens where the ambient temperature of things outside of the insulated oven cavity don't reach a temperature ...


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Is there a "broiler drawer" below the oven? That's the standard gas oven setup I'm familiar with (one burner, used both to heat the oven and for broiling in the drawer below the oven itself), and the pilot light is typically far back (or rarely in front) of that drawer, rather than being accessible from above. Either a "long match" or an arrangement to hold ...


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Back when we had one of these, we used to turn on the gas, wait for a tiny while (I seem to remember 4-5 seconds), then drop a lit match into the front center hole. That would light up the burners. I'd err on the side of too little gas until you're used to it, and it may take a few attempts Mom was pretty good at it, but that might have been through years ...


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Just because the oven is reaching high heat does not mean the olive oil that is on the surface of what is being cooked will reach the oven temperature (or get past the smoke point, even). In a deep fryer, heat is transferred almost directly from the heating element to the oil. In a pan, heat is transferred from the heat source to a pan, then directly to the ...


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Smoke is not inherently a bad thing - look at the popularity of barbecue preparations, or the wide variety of both traditional and modern smoked foods. Why wouldn't a little bit of that flavor enhance whatever is being roasted? Olive oil itself also has a robust flavor, and it browns nicely. So in many ways it contributes to the flavor of the finished dish. ...


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As you suggest: the sales person was uninformed. Maybe commission driven. For pizzas, a proper pizza stone will suffice. Other: I don't know what recipe calls for blast furnace temperatures.



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