New answers tagged

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Regarding the chemistry of what happened here, @rumtscho's comment addresses that very nicely. Quoting from the relevant portion of the linked answer: This scum is made from proteins. Meat contains muscle fibers (the proteins actin and myosin) as well as some loose proteins swimming in the fluids within the meat (the cell plasma). When you cook meat, ...


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This calls for a more refined answer then yes or no. (and this will no doubt generate some minus votes...but read me out). At the end of this answer you will find a YES, is you use your sauce reheated. How would you like to answer "is it safe to cross a road?". There is a risk of harm, so: no? That is the correct answer, but IMHO, not a usefull one.Nothing ...


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In general (if it is about random sauce): Unless the sauce is so heavy in sugar (unlikely - 120°C would mean you are making a tomato syrup that will be as thick as honey when cool), oil or thickeners that it will reach pressure-canning temperatures when heated by an oven - NO. The cans are at ambient pressure, so any mixture in them that is dominated by ...


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No, it is not safe. You need a pressure canner. That's what the USDA says about anything containing meat: There are no safe options for canning these foods listed below in a boiling water canner. See http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/soups.html for a table of pressures and processing times.


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You might try using 00 (double zero) flour, available at stores that sell Italian groceries. An employee of an Italian deli told me this flour is for pizza and has a little less protein than other flours. it is to make the dough light and the crust crisp. Hope this helps. Andrea


1

The whole "baking at altitude" thing is a beloved kitchen tale, but usually completely irrelevant. Certainly, the different pressure is a reason why the same physical changes in baking happen at a different temperature. And 8000 ft is nothing to laugh at, there water boils already at below 80 C instead of 100. So, you're dealing with a difference of ~20 ...


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I have observed a fine pizza shop owner cook the pizzas on a grid/screen and then allow them to cool a minute on the screen after the oven. Then off the screen and into the box or serving tray. The oven is a 2 inch stone base oven at 550 Fahrenheit.


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I like to make my own pizza but the oven is not so much like the pizza oven in a pizza parlor. My common convection gas oven is too scorchy so I stack two cookie sheets on the rack below the one I'm using. It seems to block the direct rush of scorching heat enough to get more even cooking.


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Cooking bacon at high temperatures causes the fat and muscle to contract at more divergent rates, yielding crinkly bacon. Plus, bacon has plently of fat, none has to be added! So, for large batches, I usually just place a large wire wrack of bacon in the oven over a pan to catch the drippings. 425 F for 20 minutes, plus/minus 2-3 minutes depending on the cut ...


1

When making bacon for a group, I generally just take about half the slab, drop it into a pan, and separate it with a fork while the pan heats up. If you had a big enough pan and don't mind crowding, you can use the entire slab at once, but I find half at a time simpler. Maybe grab two pans?


3

It really depends on how you're planning on using the bacon: If you're going to be crumbling it anyway, you can cut it across the strips, and drop it into a pan and slowly render it, then turn up the heat to let it crisp. You might also need to drain the grease part way through. If you're willing to take a loss in flavor ... you can separate it into ...


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If you mean to cook it together as it comes out of the package rather than by separating each piece, then I would say no you don't want to do this. The pieces will get glued together, and the finished product will be more like salt pork rather than bacon that you are accustomed.


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It is not an answer to your question, but since I can't post comments, a suggestion for the future: I always place a piece of baking paper (not quite sure about the english word for it) at the bottom of my oven to catch the drippings, works better than aluminium. Recently I also bought a special rubber mat for the same purpose, and that works even better.


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Bromine, lead or mercury - all of which you can find in some or the other wood treatment - will still be bromine, lead or mercury no matter how much you burn them, they will just be in different chemical compounds, and a lot of them might get expelled from the oven with the exhaust - but certainly not all, especially in that kind of oven design. And most of ...



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