Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I've baked bread in a convection oven with some succes. It's a far cry from what you can achieve with a good electric oven, but you can get some decent results. Certainly a poor to average microwave-sized electric oven will perform about the same as a decent convection microwave combination. Just remember to turn the microwave funtion off entirely. I once ...


0

If you have the time I recommend you put it in the oven to reheat somewhere between 30 and 60 minutes at 350F depending on how deep it is. If you are in a rush and your dish fits in your microwave (and is microwave safe) you could cut a great deal of time off that by first nuking it until it's mostly heated up and then finishing it off under your oven's ...


1

180 for 45 minutes should do the trick. Just make sure it is piping hot in the middle before serving. Cover the dish with foil to prevent the crust getting any crustier. You will still want to take it off for the last ten minutes of cooking to crisp it though, as the foil will make it soggy. You can absolutely prepare Cottage Pie to the pre-baking stage ...


3

Set shelves high and low. Preheat to 400. Put in the crab cakes for 5 minutes on top Turn down to 387.5 ;-) Put salmon in on lower shelf. Check in 15 minutes. Most ovens are not all that precise, really, and most recipes allow for that (your 5 minutes of variance on each item.) The top of the oven tends to be hotter than the bottom, so this works that by ...


0

I have an electric oven.I heat my stone on the floor and the bottom is perfect in 5 minutes,I then transfer the pizza to the broiler to finish the top for about 2 minutes. With perfect results.


5

With a gratin, the idea is that the vegetables (traditionally just potatoes) are sliced so thinly that they cook very easily in the cream/cooking liquid while retaining some texture. If you pre-cook the vegetables, they will just disintegrate into a mush during baking.


0

Personally I'd be delighted with a double 24, but you may find that a bit harder to find or far more expensive than the standard 30, just because the 30 is standard. And yes, it's based on a giant turkey few people will ever cook, and some of us don't even like ;-) A double is far more versatile, since you can cook two things at two temperatures at the ...


1

Look in the oven. Smell the oven. Turn the oven (and exhaust fan, if any) on to the maximum temperature. If you smell nothing untoward (there might be some "normal" smallish amount of smoke/burnt smell when you fire it up hot for a while) it's fine. If it smells like rodent urine, or you see rodent scat, you might have a problem, and firing it up might ...


2

"For the same time" seems to be your problem here. An oven will warm a pot much more slowly than a stovetop, especially a heavy iron stew pot. You'll need to monitor your temperature, and only count the time after it reaches 68 Celsius. The warming up phase can be easily close to an hour in the stove, eating away a lot of the actual cooking time.


1

Looks like the differences in the temperature gradient is causing the change in the results. The simmering on the stove top is caused by the liquid on the bottom of the pot converting to gas and bubbling through the rest of the liquid into the cooler air, only some of which is trapped under the pots lid. So you have convection within the liquid braising the ...


2

Everything can be cooked in a gas oven, but some things will be done differently. Anything thats needs heat from above (such as garlic bread) needs to be cooked in the broiler. That's the drawer at the bottom. Not a storage space!


2

There are two answers to this question, both are right and they disagree with each other. Some ovens are better for certain things, electric ovens are good for pastries, gas is better for roasts. An oven is an oven. A skilled cook can cook a pineapple upside down cake or high tea over a campfire, wood fired pizza oven, or commercial stove with equal ...


0

They really shouldn't call these convection ovens. They should be called blower ovens. Normal ovens without the blower are convection ovens with the heat rising up the middle and cooler air falling around the outer lamination (shells) of air. That's convection. When you place a cookie sheet, the hot air mushrooms in from the sides down on top of the cookie ...


1

From your description, it seems that you are simply setting it too hot. No need for a resource, just experiment until you have found the correct temperature which works for you. It seems that you expected to just set it 25 degrees lower than the old one. There are three reasons why it might now work. First, this advice usually assumes 25 Celsius, I don't ...


2

Only some 30" ranges (the technical term for an oven with an integrated cooktop) have actual warming drawers, generally only high-end models. Most only have a storage drawer, one that for efficiency reasons should be well insulated from the oven proper and so isn't suitable for warming foods. A warming drawer will have its own heat source with dedicated ...


1

A convection oven has a fan that blows hot air around the items being baked. The air flow will draw moisture from the food. To stop the drying out, you could tent the baking items with aluminum foil but that has two drawbacks: you waste aluminum foil and lots of times you do want your baking items to lose moisture during baking. Another issue as you noticed, ...


12

You can cook anything in a gas oven that you can cook in an electric oven. There might be a little extra moisture (due to the products of combustion), but some people consider that to be an advantage when baking bread and cooking roasts.


2

When I mess up a roast (I screwed up brisket for years), I would shred it and make some chili with some added ground meat. Slicing super thin and putting it on a sammy with some mayo or horseradish can mask the toughness as well.


2

Depending on how far overcooked it is, then you might be able to resuscitate it by cutting it into smaller pieces and cooking it low and slow in some liquid. For example, you could use it as the meat in a stew, or slice it thinly and then braise it with some vegetable to make a pot-roast. This also gives you an opportunity to introduce additional flavor, ...


-1

Any chance there's a lot of noise in your kitchen? Maybe urban legend or not but I know every time my mom's made yorkshire pudding we have to be queit otherwise they won't rise properly. I also strongly agree with the gluten differential - gluten brownies compared to gluten free brownies have a completely different texture and 'springiness'


2

I would check your oven temperature to be sure it's actually right, and also I'm wondering if you're over-proofing your dough, which could possibly result in it deflating when it goes into the oven, or at the very least result in a lackluster rise.



Top 50 recent answers are included