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This is a very common problem with challah (and any braided bread). As mentioned in comments, it seems likely that the splitting happened in the oven because the bread continued to expand too much after the crust had set. But the braids also complicate the reasons why this may have happened. Here are a few common things to try: Be sure not to braid too ...


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It looks as though it baked unequally which could be caused by the dough not being uniformly mixed. Here are some things that I am sure that you already know. (please keep in mind I have never made Challah) Mix your dry ingredients and make sure they are well mixed Mix your wet ingredients and make sure they are well mixed add the wet ingredients to the ...


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I quite often use a bottom heated gas oven at work for my slow cooked pork joints as we can't afford to have our main ovens on such a low heat all day. Never once have we had an issue getting crispy skin. Using a blow torch you will probably find the skin blackens on top and the underside still being chewy-er than out of date beef jerky... If you're meat ...


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Your question regarding pizza thickness, as you are making Neapolitan pizza the answer is: When stretched, the center of the dough must be no more than .4 centimeters (±10%) in thickness. From: The Serious Eats Guide To Pizza In Naples But this has nothing to do with sliding it into the oven or baking steel. While you add the toppings on your pizza ...


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I agree with GdD that sliding well can be accomplished with even a very thin crust loaded with toppings, as long as you have something it can slide on. Semolina does seem ideally suited to this. Stretching very thin can, however, make the dough more likely to stick just because as you stretch, you often expose more of the interior moisture of the dough to ...


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Sliding well has nothing to do with weight or thickness, although too thin makes the dough prone to tearing. A generous spread of ground semolina under the pizza dough after shaping will keep it from sticking to your counter while you top it, and in your oven when you bake it. The grainy semolina will act as a barrier, keeping the bottom of your dough off ...


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As long as the ribs reach a 160 temp it will work depending on whether your oven is gas propane or electric the warm settings all differ but most are slightly under the 200 mark with some being as low as 125 and others 150 or 175 or even higher... look in your ovens owners manual for more information.


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The oven in a standard 20" kitchen stove will accommodate a bird even as large as 20 lbs (9 kg). The very detailed chart here, the pertinent details of which are replicated in the chart below, establish the standard dimensions of such an oven as 18 X 16 X 14.5 inches (46 x 41 x 37 cm). In their downloadable Thanksgiving pdf, for a turkey as large as 20 ...


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MetroKitchens suggests that for a 17-20 lb bird, you need a roasting pan that is 16 x 13 x 3 inches (about 41 x 33 x 8cm). The oven will need to be taller than the pan, because a turkey sticks out above a roasting pan, but you can reduce that considerably by spatchcocking the bird. I'm bad at estimating visually, but I think it'd be around 6-10 inches ...



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