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-3

use the following formula to compute: time of one item * the temperature of that item = the "degree-minutes" for that item. divide that large number by the other temperature to get the time for the other item.


-1

180°C are enough for everyone! At least with air circulation, without something around 200°C is okay, if you go higher the pizza will usually burn on the outside. Also it depends on how much fat is used.


6

Thin pizzas are traditionally baked in extremely hot ovens for short times, thick pizzas need lower temperatures for much longer times. Keep in mind that oven temperature is only one factor, as important if not more so is the quality of the ingredients and the techniques used in preparing them. A good base, good tomato sauce, and good toppings will make a ...


9

Absolutely not. There are a lot of tricks to get good thick (or thin) pizza with oven temperatures under 300C (572F). The people at Serious Eats have researched the problem at great length and with excellent results. Few home ovens reach 300C. I made this pizza last weekend using the recipe in the above link, my oven's top temperature is 274C (525F): ...


3

I would recommend separating the crackling from the meat and re-heating both separately. The meat can go into the oven (or the microwave), the crackling can go under the grill (aka broiler).


2

Try reheating it in the oven or a toaster oven; the dry heat should prevent things from getting chewy. The microwave often imparts undesirable texture changes in food when it heats things, so that's probably your issue more than the refrigeration; any condensation from the fridge should evaporate when exposed to dry heat. I'd toss it in at 350 and check on ...


4

It is absolutely safe to do so... For most foods, I would say that there is no reason not to. If they are savory muffins like corn muffins to be served with the roast, I would not hesitate at all. For sweet goods, with a high amount of butter or oil, there is some small risk of absorbing aromas. I would generally segregating strongly aromatic foods for ...


0

Do you have access to a grill (a UK grill that is - I belive the US term is a broiler?).Heston tries a few different ways here, and one that gives reasonable results is to take a heavy iron pan, heat it (he does it in an oven, but hob should be fine), then puts the pizza into the pan and under a super hot broiler. Seems to work. With just a hob is ...


0

I would say that you cannot cook pizza without an oven. A true pizza needs a giant wallop of heat on the bottom, to form the crust, but also needs to be surrounded by high heat in order for the dough to rise and the cheese to melt properly. You might be able to simulate a stove-top oven with a cast iron pan and a cover. You would probably need to make a ...


4

Placing a pizza stone directly on a burner will likely lead to cracking. If you are limited to stove-top cooking, there are two routes that you might use to make pizza. First option, steal some of the techniques used for making grilled pizza: Preheat a large skillet medium-high with its lid in place. Cook the crust on one side, flip it over, then place ...


2

Cooking meat by time is ill-advised, whether it is on the grill or in the oven. Instead, you should cook by desired outcome, which is the final internal temperature. Pork is done around 155 F / 68 C, so you should roast it in an oven until it is just a few degrees below the target temperature, as measured by an instant read or probe thermometer inserted ...



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