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1

Without details, it's a bit of a stab in the dark, but still: Have you checked your recipe? Some doughs are intended for these paper-thin pizzas, other for deep-dish, almost cakey pizzas. Swap these and your results might be very disappointing. A few pointers, how to "read" the recipe1: Deep dish doughs typically have a generous amount of fat (olive ...


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Until you have the recipe banged out; I would start with just a cheese pizza to narrow down the issues. Do not use ingredients that have high moisture content; (vegetables and fruits) Decide on how you want to deal with moisture on bottom of dough; a use a pan with holes in bottom (special pizza pans). b. Douse bottom of pan with olive oil or lard to ...


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Ah; pizza; minutes to learn; lifetime to master. Many recipes on the internet leave out MANY important little details. Defer to a alton brown episode when possible, :) This may be more of an issue than just cheese type; If you are not letting dough sit overnight you may have issues with the flour absorbing liquid while it's cooking; try overnight rest ...


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There are lots of things you can try, but the first thing I would start with is weighing your ingredients. Use a recipe that provides ingredients by weight and buy a decent kitchen scale. Next I would look at your temperature and set that to be as high as your oven will go(mine goes to 550°F). I would ensure that you aren't over topping. I know you ...


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No, cooking in the oven and cooking on the stove will not produce the same results. The distribution of heat is completely different, the cooking times will be different, and you will have to attend to the pan while cooking to heat things evenly. You are better off starting from a stovetop recipe with the same ingredients than modifying an oven recipe for ...


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When your pizza is ready take it out of the oven, add the cheese. Put the pizza back in the oven, turn the heat off. Don't go anywhere, just keep an eye on the cheese unlit it melts, take it out and whala.. That way cheese is melted and not dry and you can basically use any taste of cheese you prefer . Its probably because your not using a pizza oven, and ...


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Make sure that the tikkas do not touch a surface e.g. an aluminium foil or a tray. Suspend them from a grid and use a lined tray at the bottom of the oven to collect the fat/juices. Cook at 180°C for 20-25 minutes (to cook the chicken through) and then cook on maximum temperature (usually 350°C) for 5-7 minutes to get the charred/burnt effect. As a side ...


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There is a lot of good information already here, and it is comprehensive. Here are four simple things that relate to your issue, and work for me: 1) turn your convection fan off, 2) after piping on pan, lift pan a few inches above counter and drop it on the counter...twice, 3) wait 30 minutes before placing in oven, and 4) halfway through baking process ...


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Aside from the differences in cleaning and price, which are important, I find that the biggest issue for me is actually cooking on the stove. Gas This is what you're used to using The control of it is reasonably accurate (if your gas stove has better control than high/low/off) The response time is immediate (if you lower the setting, it has immediate ...


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When I switched over to a gas stove, some years back, I noticed that it took considerably longer to cook food on my new (Gas) stove. like 6 min on the electric stove vs 10 min on the gas stove for boiling about 2L (7 Cups) of water (for making Tea). Then, it made me suspicious if gas stove really saves me any money that I thought it would (Gas, based on ...


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Induction (I never actually read this, but thought it looked useful; used my own knowledge) Only work with certain metal pots Will not burn non-metal items, as long as they haven't had a metal (kid-friendly) Cost-efficient once installed (if not in CA or other states with expensive electricity) Easy to clean: water and soap Gas Works with all types of ...



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