Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Usually a cheese tasting would have more variety in terms of texture and flavour and you'd progress from the mild to the stronger. However, if your goal is to compare a lot of similar cheeses to contrast with each other, you'll need to have more palate cleansing and balancing in between each cheese. A lot of the cheeses that you're considering are aged ...


8

You could certainly get a cookbook of side dishes and learn some new favourites, but what might be more useful is a book that teaches you about flavour combinations and menu planning. I would suggest Culinary Artistry as one such book. It's not about specific recipes (you can find those elsewhere or make them up), but rather it addresses the kind of skill ...


7

Beer pairing dinners in my area seem to be on the rise as more craft beer-centric establishments show up. This may not be true across the world, but I see this practice becoming increasingly common. BeerAdvocate, a noted resource amongst all the beer fanatics I know, has a guide to pairing and another specific guide for pairing with cheese. Epicurious, ...


6

Diane, You may want to consider flavors that are existing compliments to coffee. Think of the many syrups that are available at your local coffeehouse. Things that easily come to mind are chopped hazelnuts or almonds, caramel frosting/icing, cinnamon and nutmeg as spices, chocolate chips or cherries.


6

Myself, I like to keep the pairing of the quiche quite light. I like to have a "pick and eat" salad, just simple green salad, tomatoes, grapes, etc. on the side, some good cheese is also nice with a quiche. Then I put everything up, without mixing it at all. Then people can eat what they feel like. A small "make your own garnish" kind of thing. I love ...


5

[Possibly irrelevant-to-you aside: a true Hungarian goulash (as opposed to a North American or German or what-have-you goulash) is a soup. It includes a few root vegetables and possibly some "pinched noodles" (tiny little egg+flour dumplings) in the soup itself, but it is served with a hearty slice of bread or two, nothing more. So in that sense, the answer ...


4

To some extent, this is a question to which the answers are necessarily quite subjective. However, as a general guideline, I would suggest that you look at the bread as just another ingredient in the dish -- not as somehow distinct from the filling choices. Like any other ingredient pairing, you can evaluate the characteristics and choose things to ...


4

You might consider citrus or other tart fruit with citrus -- mandarin oranges segments are fairly common to pair with spinich; even if you didn't use whole fruit, consider making a vinagrette using orange juice. I've also seen recipes for spinich salads with strawberries or cranberries; I've also had a pineappe and avocado salad before that might work well ...


4

Perhaps digestive biscuits/oatmeal biscuits, what would be called Graham crackers in America, as something to hold under the cheese. These would give a good base without being too salty. The idea of fresh fruit is a good one, as the cheeses are hard and mostly quite salty/umami. I would add fresh figs (if you can get them) to your list. I'm not sure about ...


4

As with all raw-meat or sushi dishes, this will never be 100% safe to eat; at best we are talking about a calculated food safety risk, with steps taken to mitigate that risk when possible. For this reason, it is CRUCIAL that the chicken be kept at fridge temperature as much as possible. When cutting, use a pre-chilled cutting board if possible, and serve ...


4

Homemade paneer, made with full-fat milk. Full-fat is important, as fat shields the capsaicin receptors in your tongue, and can make spicy food more palatable for those that can't handle spice. You can buy paneer at an Indian market, but you can make it at home with minimal effort. All you need is a gallon of whole milk, some lemon juice, a pot to boil it ...


4

In Ireland boiled or glazed ham is a staple. Traditionally it's had with cut up cabbage (ideally you would cook the cabbage in the same water the ham was boiled in as this gives it lovely flavour) but you could just cut it up and pan fry it with a little butter. Normally it would be served with boiled floury potatoes. Traditionally (in Ireland) you ...


3

I'd avoid a coagulant if you can, it will likely keep this dense on whats already a rather dense sounding dish. Personally, I'd beat loads of air into your sour cream/cream cheese mixture and serve a small whipped dollop of it. It will keep it light and still offset your spiciness a little. If the pork chili is the star, keep it complimented but not ...


3

Fresh fried Indian style banana chips are incredible with just salt. http://cuisineindia.wordpress.com/2008/06/09/banana-chips/ However, I have had some from Kerela that were spiced with pepper as well, they were quite tasty. It could be a lot of fun to play with Indian and Thai spices. I could see these in the role of a garnish, or as an alternative to ...


3

Two of my favored pairings with quiches are fresh fruit and a hearty bread. The fruit I usually just cut up into bite size pieces and served on a plater so guests can pick what they want; it gives a nice sweet contrast to a savory quiche. For the bread, I like something with some crunch to it, so tend to lightly butter and toast a split hearty loaf of ...


3

Make meat "not the main feature". Having it as the main feature is a piece of history when meat was the most expensive part of the meal, and it also seems to have become an unhealthy piece of history. Meat is significantly cheaper nowadays, so you can spend more on other things and make them the main part of the meal, not just side dishes. It is a mental ...


3

Sweet and sour red cabbage, cuts through the richness of the goulash very nicely - particularly if you cook some thin slices of tart apples with the cabbage. The vinegar also turns the cabbage vivid purple which also adds a nice contrast to earthy goulash. I found this recipe that is almost identical to my mom's (although I probably would opt out of using ...


3

I have had success pairing steaks with freshly pressed apple juice, as the tartness helps offset the richness and fats of the meat and cheese. An apple/raspberry mix works beautifully, too, as does apple and blackcurrant. While ginger beer and ginger ale may work, you run the risk of the drink taking over the show, which you don't want. Two more pairings ...


2

For salads I advise chicory and apple. I'm not sure if I use the right word when I say 'chicory' so here's a picture of what I mean. I think it's not a very loved veggie because of its bitterness, but I like the combination of the bitterness of the chicory and the sweetness of the apple. Oh and one tip: cut out the 'root' of the chicory, it's the most ...


2

I'm a big believer in contrasts in meal planning. For example, one thing I like to consider is the basic flavor profile of the main dish and the side dishes. For example, if you've got a particularly rich tasting main course, you could complement it with a slightly bitter side dish such as Brussels sprouts or broccoli raab. A sweeter vegetable would be a ...


2

Bananas are a good combination with many berries, including raspberry since they don't compete, but add a mild/sweet flavour for contrast. Apples and berries are also a good combination, though for a smoothie, you'd probably want to use (unsweetened) applesauce, rather than raw apple. I've seen commercial drinks that pair raspberry with orange and ...


2

I find that blackberries and blueberries make an excellent addition to a raspberry-based smoothie. I usually use vanilla greek yogurt with frozen rasp/black/blueberries when I make a "purple" smoothie. This can be kind of tart, but the vanilla greek yogurt and vanilla soy milk offset it pretty well. If you're using non-sweetened yogurt and/or ...


2

The qualities I like in complementing raw spinach are tart, crunchy and creamy. You’ve probably seen before toasted nuts for the crunch, and cheese or dressing for the creamy, but you asked about fruit. Here are some ideas: sour apple, Asian pear, dried banana chips, jicama (not technically a fruit), melon, star fruit, seedless grapes, dried cranberries, ...


2

I would suggest anything that you can grab easily and is not difficult to eat. You are going to have to get dirty cracking the lobster, so why not get some corn kernels on your face? Growing up in New England our lobster dinner included sweet corn on the cob and cornbread. (The butter can be used on all of it!) Also, if you want some greens, maybe some ...


2

Here is an answer to a similar question that covers some of the basics leading to the details below. Here is a flavor wheel that has been used in particular by Whole Latte Love, created by Ted Lingle of the SCAA (and sold by them) for the purpose of cupping: Coffee Profiling at Whole Latte Love Coffee Tasting at Whole Latte Love


2

I've had french fries with (beef) gravy and blue cheese, and it's delicious. However, if you want to get away from potatoes and aren't comfortable with roasting, what about doing some other sort of root vegetable mash? Like mash potatoes, but using turnips, parsnips, rutabaga, or sweet potato instead. I've tried them all and I think they're great. As for a ...


2

One traditional accompaniment for pork is apple sauce. This follows the convention that a fruity sauce cuts through the fattiness of meat - duck a l'orange is another example. Apple sauce is easy to make - just taking a cooking apple, chop it up, stew it down with a little water, then stir in some sugar and butter to taste.


2

I think this depends on the type of Gorgonzola. A Gorgonzola Dolcé has a milder, sweeter, less-blue flavor, so it should probably be served with a milder steak, like a Filet Mignon. A stronger, more traditional Gorgonzola should probably be served with a stronger flavored steak like a Skirt Steak or a Ribeye. If you flip the combinations around, one of ...


2

The classic flavour pairing with rhubarb is vanilla: rhubarb and vanilla custard is a British staple. Fresh custard (Creme Anglaise, as the French call it) is easy to make and delicious. Almond also pairs well with rhubarb. You could incorporate ground almonds into the cobbler mix, or perhaps fold some amaretto liqueur into lightly whipped cream to serve ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible