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20

If a magnet sticks to it, it's ferrous. I'd like to give a more elaborate answer, but there isn't anything more to it.


16

I can answer you with first hand experience and a picture. Your lovely dark gray finish will become light gray, streaked, and hideous. I'll never buy this style of pot again, it is just too useful to be able to dishwash them sometimes.


16

I've seen these pans at one of the local cookware/houseware stores as well and wondered the same thing. The best I've been able to dig up so far is the following: GreenPan's official statement about their material is: GreenPan™ does not use PTFE, but brings with Thermolon™ non-stick technology a healthy alternative to the market. Thermolon™ is heat ...


16

I have a ceramic-coated pan too, and always treated it with care (plastic utensils, no overheating, etc.) It failed too, after some time (I think I've had it for 9 months now, and used frequently). Unlike a failed Teflon pan, it does not look or feel any different. But while at the beginning it was superslick, with everything gliding right off it in a ...


16

Lining with foil works well with cooking methods like baking or broiling, where the food is not stirred or manipulated much, and so the foil can sit undisturbed. With stir frying, you are quite likely to break through the foil while doing the stirring, and have to clean up fully in any case. Also, you probably would not get as good a stir fry due the thin ...


15

I'm not going to get into the arguments back and forth about Teflon and its associated chemicals and whether you get them in your body from cookware or not. I think there might be some risk, so just like I don't use aluminum pots (like my family had when I was a kid), I don't use teflon cookware. I use stainless cookware because I like to be able to scour ...


13

It depends some on technique, and some on what you're cooking. And it depends on your definition of "sticking." Foods that are high in protein (especially those low in fat) are more prone to sticking. So a really lean white fish, which is almost all protein, will want to stick. Likewise, egg whites can stick. To some extent, almost any food that doesn't ...


12

I don't see a problem with non-stick as long as you replace it when necessary. The only exception to this being woks which (I think) tend to get destroyed easily if they are non-stick.


12

This happens to mine, and they are most definitely stainless, not aluminum. Our stainless sink gets the same way. I assume it's from all the minerals in our water. I have found that mixing up some Oxyclean and water and a couple of minutes' soak and a scrub with a plastic scrubber will get rid of it (both from the pan and from the sink). It comes right back, ...


12

bikeboy definitely has it right, but just to be a little more specific: What you're seeing is scale, also referred to as fouling and several other terms. In all probability, it is specifically limescale that you're seeing, and it's very common in hot water taps, kettles, and on air-dried cookware. If you have hard water (or even if you don't) it will tend ...


11

I'm with @Ward -- I like being able to scour my pans for those times when even deglazing doesn't work. (although, I've found that if you ever forget about the stock that you're trying to reduce ... burning chicken bones is a nasty smell and will stain even stainless steel). I do have some non-stick, and even a non-stick flat-bottomed wok (from circulon, ...


11

The right tool for the right job. Non-stick is great for pancakes, eggs, or grilled cheese sandwiches, steel is great for searing meat and being able blend something right in the pan, cast iron is great for slow cooking and frying. I think a very minimum solution set is a cast iron skillet and a large stainless steel frying pan and steel sauce pan. Adding a ...


11

I've never heard of doing anything other than giving it a good cleaning, as you would with any new item before first use. I've only heard of seasoning used for cast iron and carbon steel, not for stainless steel. Looking online, I did find instructions for seasoning stainless steel, but I'd be inclined to look at the paperwork that came with the pan -- if ...


10

You have to make sure to buy a heavy duty, preferrably professional grade pan. Thick base. Most important. I have owned my pans for about five years, and nary a warp. Completely flat. I also have a glass top stove. Note to the wise, do not use a dishwasher to clean good cookware. Always clean pans, pots, knives, etc. by hand. Any good restaurant ...


10

The reason that cookware warps is that it is has too thin of a base. When it has been heated to a high temperature, it warps upon cooldown. The only way to avoid this is to buy very sturdy, heavy duty cookware. You need to look for something with a very thick and heavy base, then you will have no issue. And don't think that it will put you in the ...


10

There are a couple of reasons, traditional and some functional: The home cultures where these recipes are indigenous use a wok, so many recipe authors go the same way Woks are usually made out of carbon steel, and are poor conductors of heat. This means that the strongest heat from the concentrated heat source is in the center/bottom of the wok. As you ...


9

I would definitely go for a cast iron skillet. After reading this blog post on Salt and Fat - http://saltandfat.com/post/535900861/the-cast-iron-skillet I decided to give it a go. I picked one up from my local camping store for about (AU)$20. Once properly seasoned it is surprisingly non-stick. I've been using it now for the last couple of months and have ...


9

North American cookware companies seem to use the terms "saute" and "sauteuse" interchangeably, but technically, the saute pan is the straight-sided one, and the sauteuse or "fry pan" is the slope-sided one. In French cooking equipment terms, the straight-sided one is called a "sautoir", and the sauteuse has higher sides and while angled out, they are not ...


9

As I understand it, when you combine high heat and vegetable oil you get a fairly stable polymer (much like a plastic or resin). The polymer bonds with the surface (which is porous), and results in robust surface. This is what we use to season cast iron cookware, but it's less desirable on stainless and other lighter colour hardware. You can prevent the ...


9

That is a Holzit pie pan, used for making berry pies, where the filling may expand and run over the side of the pie during baking.


9

I would actually recommend the opposite of what was said above. Since the meat is so thin you may have much better results pan searing it in an extremely hot pan from slightly frozen. This way the outermost layer will start to undergo the maillard reaction long before the inside of the steak reaches a medium-rare temp and will give you a better chance of ...


8

Dishwashing fluid isn't a simple soap; it's much more aggressive. A good portion of it is sodium hydroxide (lye) which will attack the protective layer on aluminum surfaces (aluminum oxide), allowing for significant corrosion to occur. All aluminum will form this oxide layer in air, but it can also be intentionally grown via anodization and colored to form ...


8

The usual heat transfer issues all apply. What are those? Well, let me see The handle will warm up until it's total heat losses equal the total heat coming in. Heat comes in mostly by conduction from the body of the pot. Some materials conduct heat better than others. Metals tend to have high thermal conductivity (with aluminum and especially copper begin ...


8

It's an egg poacher. Looks like this exact model. Note that these don't really actually "poach" eggs, the result is more like a coddled egg. They do essentially work like double boilers.


8

I'm going to assume that this is a non-stick coated aluminum (maybe s/s) pan and specifically Teflon or one of the common knock-offs; those are the only types of pans I've seen that are white under the black coating. If you had well-seasoned cast iron, it would be grayish colour (well, iron). It's not unsafe in the same sense as eating raw meat is unsafe, ...


8

You can't effectively line a Bundt pan with paper. My favorite method is to mix cake release and keep it in the cabinet. It lasts for months and months. Just mix 1 part vegetable oil, 1 part shortening and 1 part flour. Brush that mixture in the pan, getting all the nooks and crannies. It doesn't make the mess that traditional flouring does, I always end up ...


7

The usual reason given is that Aluminum will react with the alkalis in dishwasher detergent and discolour. Automatic dishwasher detergent has a lot of stuff in it.


7

Don't buy a large set of ANY kind of cookware, buy cookware to match the tasks you need it for! For most of these tasks, nonstick surfaces cannot handle the high heat you want, and will wear out and become super-stick. Since you can't properly scour them, once the coating degrades, nonstick pans are actually harder to clean. So, you want nonstick only ...


7

This looks like half-polymerized oil. It happens when you overheat a layer of oil in the pan. It won't come off through scraping. If you insist on removing it mechanically, you will have to try a polishing brush on a Dremel or something similar. I remove these chemically. Make a lye concentrate in the pot and let it sit overnight. Rinse very (!) ...


7

As others have already said, it appears to be polymerized oil. It happens when oil is left in the pan hot for a long period (temperature depends on oil), or smoking for not as long. However, lye probably isn't required to remove it. Bar Keeper's Friend and a bit of scrubbing will probably manage to take this off. As an advantage, while getting BKF on your ...



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