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I don't know about the propellants, but you're probably doing yourself a disfavor if you are using an oil spray on nonstick. The problem is that you're using way too little oil with them. It won't matter if you're making stir fry, but people tend to plop a single piece of meat or fish on the pan. Then what you have is vast ares of pan bottom, hot, covered ...


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For one don't rough your burger up lol. Do it gently don't pack it down so tight that you get hockey pucks. And don't flatten the patty with a spatula you'll press out all that good juicy flavor. It's simple man treat it like a steak. When you eat steak you want tender and juicy surely you want the same from your burger. You'll need a drop of olive oil if ...


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Absolutely not A non-stick pans surface will be ruined when any oil becomes polymerised onto it. The whole idea of a non-stick pan is that it's surface is non-stick to food. Permanently layering it with anything else will make it less non-stick Only use non-stick pans for low to medium heat cooking, and use no, or very little oil in them. Be very gentle ...


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I can verify that the green pan can handle high heat. My wife accidentally left the green pan on the element on high for more than 8 hours (she left the pan on the element in the morning and then went to work and totally forgot about it). When i returned later that afternoon around 5pm, the pan was on the stove with the element on high and the pan did not ...


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I've had this issue also with new pans. I've purchased pans before that need to be seasons and tempered by heating in the oven. As any metal heats it expands, during expansion you will hear little knocks and creaks. I've had pans with rolled edges that trapped water from washing, has caused the water to escape as steam and whistle on its way out, very ...


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Ceramic pans are more non-stick than PTFE. They don't need oil. Ceramic pans are less durable. They fail within a few months of use. Ceramic pans don't scratch, they are too hard. No, don't throw it away. They don't contain the halogen elements found in PTFE. I wouldn't say so. Mine and my mother's failed earlier, and I've read many reports saying the ...


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I can address a few of your points. Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) is the third most slippery substance known to man (the first two being incredibly expensive - an alloy of aluminum and Diamond-like carbon). There is nothing used in home cooking that is more non-stick. Teflon pans are NOT highly vulnerable to normal use with metallic utensils. Just ...


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There are many, many grades of 'carbon steel' but I don't think the differences will matter much for cookware. What might matter is how thick it is: too thin and the pan won't survive long. The quality of the joint between the handle and the pan might be an issue but that can always be repaired. Frankly, for the price, I'd buy the cheapo version and ...


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Steel is pretty much steel (carbon cast etc) It's the surface that's needs to be conditioned. Only buy pans with a smooth surface regardless of price. Then use metal scourers and spatulas to remove any rough spots. And then regularly heat with oil until it smokes For eggs, with a conditioned pan, pour in a layer of salt and heat until the salt discolours, ...


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Liquid naturally comes out of all meats as they cook. If you're using high heat and a frying pan, you don't really notice it because it evaporates quickly. That brown stuff you see in a frying pan after cooking meat on high heat are the evaporated juices. If you're baking them at around 350 F, you'll also notice water being released. This is amplified if ...



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