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First, use oil. Many people use no oil at all on nonstick, but it won't work that way on a cast iron pan. Second, preheat it properly. With iron, it takes a long time. If you have a resistive electrical stove, it will be quite longer than you expected. Third, you might want to steer away from non-bound starches in the beginning, until the seasoning has ...


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Mine lives on the burner only moved if all 4 burners are occupied. Once sticky food is dished out, it gets an inch or two of water and brought to boil. drain, wipe, done. Great in oven as well. Just not so much for iron-flavored berry pies.


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So, here's is what I did: I did calculate the volume of the cake pan I wanted to use (37 x 5 cm) and the one the recipe calls for (23 x 4 cm), thanks to @Stephie's answer. From the ratio, I figured how much batter is needed to fill the 37 cm cake pan. As for the baking of the large cake, I did take @Joe's advice, used an old towel and a tin can opened from ...


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Cooking: Sticking will be the most noticeable issue. It takes some getting used to, here are some starter advice: If you are frying, make sure your meat/fish/veg is properly dry. A wet food will only worsen the sticking. Once you put the food in the pan, let it brown for at least 2 minutes before trying to move/shake it. This will allow to develop a brown ...


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Food will easily stick if you're not careful. That seems a little obvious and facetious, but it is a separate concern than cast iron vs. nonstick. With cast iron, a good seasoning reduces sticking; you just have to be careful to maintain it. There's no comparable treatment for a stainless pan (the closest thing is, well, a non-stick coating) and so you are ...


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Arm fatigue. They're heavy enough that you'll need to consider how you hold them as you're dumping food out of them. You'll often see chefs on cooking shows grabbing the handle in a strange way, where the grip is from underneath, and then they hold it with the handle at the top and the pan almost dangling below. Learn this technique, and you won't end up ...


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You are asking about weight. A cake pretty much weighs the same as the sum of its ingredients (maybe some slightly evaporation from the buttermilk). There are plenty of free cup to gram converters on the internet, just use one of those to get an idea how close you are to your 4 kg goal. An egg weighs about 60 - 80 g, but it depends on the size.


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It is a question of scaling. In chat you told us the given recipe was for a 23 cm pan. I'll ignore height for now, assuming the same height for all pan sizes, because that can be adjusted in a second step. The math: The cake batter for round cakes fills a cylinder. The volume of which is base circle area x height, ignore height as stated above. The ...


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An experienced cake baker friend of mine suggests one egg per five guests when making sponge wedding cakes like chocolate or vanilla (not traditional Buritsh fruit cakes, which is the norm where I come from) I'm in the same boat, of cooking my first wedding cake for 150 guests, and I'll be making a 30-egg cake on that basis.



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