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Aluminum likes to bow as you describe. If you lack any good hard surfaces in the kitchen, take the pan outside and whack its bottom on the sidewalk a couple times. That'll reflatten it. Carefully aplied hammers or fists can accomplish the same job inside.


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I have one large, deep sided skillet, which bows upward like that. I'm very careful not to shock the pans, but this one is very thin. The other pans I have, with thick bottoms, don't move at all. I got into the habit of putting the tea pot on, while cooking. This is partly because I'm usually also making coffee, and I use the hot water to warm the cup ...


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The sauté pan is usually not very deep, is invariably round, and possesses either straight or sloped sides. For pans of this sort, ease of handling is given primacy because unlike other pans they’re intended to be handled a good deal during food preparation. Accordingly, in order to be lightweight as well as highly conductive, they’re typically made of ...


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First of all, a Teflon pan will get gradually ruined anyway. Even when you don't use oil, the heat and the food itself will wear out the coating, it is just very sensitive this way. Using oil will speed up the process. Second, both existing technologies for nonstick pans, PTFE (Teflon) and ceramic, will get ruined by oil. If you want to cook with olive oil ...


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Other answers have addressed the comparison in the first two pans. I would just add one more voice to the chorus against grill pans, unless you absolutely need grill marks and/or are trying to drain all possible fat out of what you're cooking. (A balanced perspective on the benefits and drawbacks of grill pans was given in another question.) Outdoor ...


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EDIT: The cookware used is by Zwilling JA Henckels. They are Thermolon-coated, which is why I mistook it for a Green Pan--they are the same coating (ceramic.) You can see the cookware used in the show here: http://shop.foodnetworkstore.com/nav/department/cookware/show/chopped/0 My original guesstimation: This looks like a Green Pan, an attempt to make ...


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I'd offer the following recommendations if someone hasn't worked with cast iron before: Cast iron is heavy. If you're not used to them, and used to flipping things in your pan by just lifting and shaking ... it will not go well until you've gotten used to it. You'd likely be better off with a smaller pan, provided that it's of sufficient size for the ...


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Your third example, since it's a griddle, is indeed very different from the first two. By no means does it meet the definition of an all-purpose frying pan. However, it must be acknowledged that your emphasis is on the preparation of steaks and burgers. For that specialized purpose, if you're quite keen on having grill marks on the meat, I would suggest that ...


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Both of the skillets by "Lodge" are well reviewed. If you choose a skillet, I would recommend going to the next larger diameter (which would be roughly 30 cm - or 12 inches) so that you have more options for cooking meat, especially if you ever want to fry food for more than 1 person. If you think you will ever want to make a pan-sauce or gravy, this type ...


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Of the three you list, I personally would go with the 1st or 2nd option you listed. If your primary use will be for steaks, burgers, etc, either of them will work fine. Plus you will have the versatility to use them for other things. (As an example, I baked cornbread in a cast iron skillet last evening.) The 3rd option will work but is not as versatile as ...



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