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21

Looking at individual recipes, there is a great deal of overlap between Crêpes and Swedish pancakes. If, however, you compare hundreds of recipes, some clear differences emerge. There are also differences between the English interpretations of these recipes and those written in French or Swedish. In the chart above, each cohort consists of at least 100 ...


19

Separating the eggs and whipping the egg whites before folding into the batter could assist in this. At home it's not a problem, but if it's a very busy that you had them in they're not likely to be doing this due to the fact that this will need to be done in batches. Adding a bit of baking soda in addition to the baking powder could assist as well, but ...


18

You are correct that in the US buttermilk refers to cultured milk and not the soured leftovers from making butter. Historically buttermilk was the liquid left after making butter that had fermented during the accumulation of the cream. It was described as milky and sour- not creamy like modern buttermilk. Your recipe is certainly referring to the cultured ...


16

Given your updated criteria, what about using powdered milk for crepes and pancakes? Powdered milk tends to be very inexpensive. You can usually find in in the baking aisle at groceries in the U. S. The powdered milk will last you for a long time. You can also get powdered eggs. Just google for them. As Martha astutely commented below, look for recipes ...


12

Batter for pancakes is often nicer if it is left in the fridge for a few hours. I'd make them fresh tonight with the batter you're making for the couple you want now. Enjoy!


11

You might try reducing the cooking heat a little, say on medium heat. That way, the middle will finish cooking without the outside being overcooked. And usually when you flip a pancake it should be almost entirely cooked through anyway. You want to flip when the bubbles are pretty set on the top.


11

Absolutely the first hotcake/pancake is the worst. Typically, the pan has not reached an optimal temperature nor has the oil/butter that you use seeped into the pan to create a better cooking surface for the hotcake. An improperly heated and greased pan will lead to suboptimal pancake. To cook the perfect first pancake (or as close to the second as ...


10

If this: Is what you are looking for, (we call them Толстые блинчики or fat pancakes) then baking soda is used. We also separate the yolks and mix them with sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, cream and flour. The whites are whipped separately and folded into the mixture.


10

Crepes do not contain baking powder or baking soda for leavening. They also typically use melted butter vs. oil in pancakes and have a higher liquid to flour ratio. Basic crepes contain only eggs, milk, water, a pinch of salt and flour. You can however make them more sweet or savory by adding chopped herbs or a bit of sugar (not too much or you'll have ...


9

Eggs are completely safe in cooked food, and pancakes are cooked. Pancakes made from scratch have egg in the batter too. As long as you don't drink the batter, or more realistically, leave an uncooked bit in the middle of the pancakes, you're totally safe. (And of course, it doesn't take much to kill salmonella, and a mL of uncooked batter right in the ...


9

You pour in the batter, wait for the underside to be cooked (some brown patches), flip it, then put cheese on the (browned) top. With spek (bacon), you don't need to do this, you can just put the spek into the pan, pour batter over it, and proceed as normal. Dutch pancakes are fairly thin, so they don't take very long to cook. Apple pieces won't burn either, ...


8

Your question doesn't indicate that you are using any fats when making your pancakes. Many people make the mistake of thinking that just because it's nonstick that you can get away with not greasing the griddle. This is just wrong. I always run a stick of butter over the heated griddle a few times, then rub it in with a paper towel. You want a really thin ...


8

I'd say the difference, at least to Swedish people, is that crepes is more of a non-sweet main dish. If it's rolled up and filled with meat/vegetables/fish/mushrooms, and possibly with the addition of cheese on top of the rolls; the "Swedish pancake" turns into a crepe. To Swedes, "pancakes" are exclusively had with sweet toppings such as jam, sugar, cream, ...


8

If it doesn't contain eggs, or at least something that serves as a substitute for eggs, it's not a crepe. Crepes cook quickly because eggs need very little time/heat to set up. Like justkt said, what you've described is a tortilla. I'm not exactly sure how or why a tortilla "sets up" (if you can even use that term for a flatbread), but it's a completely ...


7

One thing you might be doing that will severely reduce the lifetimes of these pans is overheating them. Anything over 260 °C (500 °F) will cause the coating to deteriorate. Usually this happens when you leave the pan preheating on high without any food on it.


7

Pancakes behave like high-fat bread. They go stale rather quickly. Your recipe doesn't need to be altered. Let them cool completely so you don't freeze condensation. Wrap them tightly to keep out air. If you really care about them you can use the paper between layers but I haven't found it to be necessary. If they freeze together they can be easily pried ...


7

The baking soda and acid from the dried buttermilk should not react in any significant amount until you hydrate the mixture, so it should work. Remember, baking powder is acid and sodium bicarbonate in the same can, and there is little except acid and reactant; your mix will have a lot of buffer ingredients as well. I would not add the oil to the dry mix ...


6

Soy milk works great in pancakes. My basic recipe for pancakes is about a cup of flour, about a cup of soy milk, a tablespoon or two of sugar and veg oil, and a few teaspoons of baking powder. Works great, makes nice, fluffy pancakes. (I know, not a "recipe" so much as list of ingredients with approximate proportions, but that's how I tend to cook, ...


5

Adding a little bit of carbonated water will definitely help make your pancakes fluffier. The goal hear is to create little bubbles in the pancake, so they are literally "airy". I've read from sources that you have to let the batter sit for 5 minutes before beginning to cook. Besides for that, one of the biggest mistakes that everyone seems to mention is: ...


5

Its going to depend on the type of packaging and also the freezer. Lightly wrapped in plastic wrap (or worse, paper) will freezer burn fairly quickly. Vacuum-sealed will last much longer. A self-defrost freezer with wide temperature swings will burn quicker. A manual defrost chest freezer much slower. Worst case is probably around a month or less (not ...


5

I often use coconut milk or cream in my pancakes and it's delicious. Sometimes rice milk, but it does have a bit of a tendancy to stick. Ok if you're using teflon I suppose.


5

Yes.The basic ingredients for both are the same; the difference lies in how they are cooked.


5

It is no wonder you can't keep them whole. There isn't anything in the recipe to give them integrity. A normal pancake has lots of egg and lots of flour. When you are frying them, the proteins of the egg uncurl and connect to their neighbours to set in a loose, weak mesh. You know how the egg white sets when you fry an egg without whisking it? That happens ...


5

No, it will not react. There is a bit of theory behind it. The reaction in batter is a reaction between a base and an acid. For this type of reaction, you need ions swimming freely in water. In dried substances, your ions are stuck to other ions to form molecules, or ion gitters, depending on the substance. They cannot react with anything, just like a pen ...


5

In a pancake recipe, it is unlikely to be a practical concern. The reason these ideas get started is because: Small recipes have intentional rounding-off errors to make measurements simple (1/2 tsp for example, instead of .4321 teaspoons) Scaling up may magnify error In yeast raised doughs, where yeast grows exponentially over time, scaling yeast up ...


4

It is also helpful to have your batter be on the thicker side, because it gives it more chance to inflate up before it spreads out on the griddle.


4

In general places that do this with pancakes do not cut-out, but indeed use a mold or the like. The scrambled eggs would likely look fine "cut", but part of a pancake is the edge, even if it is modified by touching the edge of the mold. So long as the mold is metal, your dollar-store purchases should be fine. You will likely need to oil/butter them in ...


4

Since you're actually trying to find a lightweight, long shelf-life alternative to eggs and milk, powdered milk and powdered eggs are probably your best alternatives. If you want to have a mix-and-go arrangement, you're going to need dough conditioners and fillers that help prevent gluten from forming when you mix with liquid. Those would include ascorbic ...


4

While Wikipedia is not always the best source, in this case they do a good job explaining the different kinds of pancakes there are in the world: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pancake. If you have had a crepe in France then you would know the difference between true Crepes and Swedish pancakes. While both are round, flat, and made of the same basic ...



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