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I've made lasagna several times with homemade egg pasta. The pasta cooks in the steam generated by the ingredients you're baking and there is no need to blanch, parcook or do anything to the homemade pasta before using it in your recipe. The noodles can be quite fragile and moving them around once they are cooked can easily tear them or stretch them out to ...


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Michael Rhulman writes: "The pasta dough ratio is 3 parts flour, 2 parts egg. So I crack 1 egg per serving into a bowl, then multiply that weight by 1.5 and add that much flour." Try that. Also, the recipe for extruded pasta is different, most often made with semolina and water...almost always a crumbly texture when entering the extruder.


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What is your method for cooling the pasta? Is the goal to have it cool enough to work with? Or to stop the cooking process, keeping in mind it's going in the oven later? My opinion is that the only cases when you should rinse pasta after cooking is if you're making a cold pasta salad, or if you're going to serve it plain. The reason why you should avoid ...


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I generally let shells cool 'til thy're comfortable to work with (running them uner cold water, then draining). I've never chilled them in the fridge, though. I don't know what that would go to their elasticity. I would fear that for manicotti, they'd firm up too much and keep their crushed shape if they're not pliable enough when filling (thus, not ...


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Sure. Lots of recipes actually recommend that you let them cool: Disclaimer, this is just a list of recipes. I have never tried them and do not necessarily recommend them. Beef and Cheese Manicotti, Giada De Laurentiis: Using a slotted spoon, transfer the manicotti from the pot to the oiled baking sheet and cool. Easy Baked Manicotti, Kraft Foods ...


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I make partially wholemeal-flour pasta, and have tried 100% wholemeal also; I prefer the former. Let's start with the dough. I think a couple things are at work: wholemeal flour will take a bit longer to hydrate than refined (e.g., all-purpose) flour; wholemeal flour will generally absorb (require) more water to fully hydrate than AP flour. I'd suggest ...


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I have found that adding salt to pasta water helps the pasta hold the water when it comes in contact with the salt in the sauce. When the pasta was not cooked in salted water it weeps when sauce is served on top of undressed pasta. Dont know why? Just an observation.


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As passed down from my very Italian Godmother... Start by browning a few pounds of pork shoulder or other pork as per personal preference. A good half dozen cloves of garlic, smashed, no need to brown. A big fist full of parsley. I'm surprised nobody has mentioned parsley. as far as basil or other herbs we never used anything but parsley. Put everything ...


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A typical, basic Italian tomato sauce is made with canned (preferably San Marzano) tomatoes. It is simply made. Saute some onion, with some garlic (not a lot...one or two cloves, sliced, per 28oz can of tomatoes), half a grated carrot (to balance acidity of tomato), some herb (I prefer thyme, but oregano or marjoram are fine). Don't let the onion and ...


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Okay so let me first say I'm a novice with Italian food. However I have faced the exact same issue. Follow these steps that I've created: Put a teaspoon of dried rosemary in a mug of water and microwave for two minutes. Pour the water into the sauce. Discard or re-dry the rosemary sticks. Put a tspn of dried oregano straight into the sauce. A pinch of ...


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I suggest that you freeze uncooked noodles because cooked noodles are nasty when you try to thaw and cook again. You can also freeze balls of the dough and then take it out and thaw about an hour before using it to make "fresh" noodles as needed!



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