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1

Viscosity of the cold dough is probably too high for good rolling. It's tearing and blobbing rather than feeding smoothly through the rollers. I'm not finding a ref for rolling, but for extrusion: The ideal temperature for pasta extrusion is between 45 and 50°C, as anything above 50°C will denature the proteins, impeding gluten production and ...


0

As fresh pasta typically only requires a minute or two to cook, I'd be inclined to do one of the following: Only shock the pasta in water. (dip in, immediately remove and mix in with the sauce) Cook the pasta in the sauce on the stovetop to soften it (maybe 30sec to a minute?), then place it into the casserole dish, then stir in the dairy products. If ...


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Personally I'd suggest blanching your pasta. By blanching: I mean get a big pan of heavily salted water on a rolling boil. Drop your pasta into the water, give it a stir. After 1 min or when the water has come back to boil drain the pasta off. At this point your pasta will still be el' dante but not raw which is what I suspect the directions are ...


1

Cooked pasta has a layer of sticky starch on it, when it cools down, it will make it stick to whatever is adjacent to it. If it's pasta, the pasta will stick together. If you add oil, the pasta will not stick to itself, but on the other hand, you'll get a bunch of oil on the pasta, not very nice! The proper way is to add your sauce to the pasta immediately, ...


2

There is so much confusion when people don't call the Caputo flours by their real names. There is no such things called Caputo "Rosso" or "Blue". This is what everybody wants to call them, and it leads to confusion. Caputo has a flour called Pizzeria that comes in 55 lb (25 kilo) bags which happen to be Blue. They also have a small blue bag that is 2.2 lbs ...


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Different brands of pasta could result in different textures. Have you tried to determine the store brand...or experimented with different brands? Ingredients might be the same...but quality, manufacturing and drying varies, influencing the end result.


6

Expanded from the comments... Use properly salted water when cooking the pasta. Slightly undercook the pasta a little bit; the pasta will continue to cook as you prepare the salad. Do not rinse the pasta. Mix the ingredients while the pasta are hot; they will absorb more flavour; I would try to season the pasta before adding oil; since oil will tend to ...


2

It's a kind of silly answer, but if all else fails, try a different brand. I've tried everything (including plenty of rinsing) on the Trader Joe's orecchiette, and never had much luck: they're smooth and identically shaped so they just stick anyway. But other brands have some variation in shape and ridges, so they can't stick as easily.


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The previous answer is very complete and correct. However my preference based on education and experience would be to get your sauce done all at the same time and let it sit at least overnight to allow the flavors to combine and meld together. A sauce such as a bolognese has a lot of flavors. If you complete it even a week ahead and let it sit in the fridge ...


6

Short version: If it's only overnight, and you seal the containers reasonably well, you'll be okay prepping any of those ingredients ahead of time and storing them in the refrigerator overnight. I often leave onions in the fridge when preparing a recipe that calls for only half an onion, or if I've decided to use less than I prepped, or if I'm making a ...


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The longer the better but you need to get the temperature right. It just needs to gently bubble, not boil. The longer you cook it the thicker the sauce so for thinner, long cooked sauce, consider adding no more than about a half a cup of water after about two hours of cooking. Then cook for another hour. After that, turn heat of and let sauce return to ...



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