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Scarface was the nickname of the early 20th century American organized crime boss, Al Capone. He was slashed in the face while working at a New York City nightclub. The injury left a scar that led to the nickname. Capone's parents immigrated from Italy, and it is said that he enjoyed eating Italian foods. The notoriety and name-recognition of Al Capone ...


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Ah, One Pot Pasta.... As loads of bloggers, authors and cooks - possibly inspired by Martha Stewart and her team - have confirmed: dumping the pasta, sauce ingredients and a carefully meassured amount of liquid in one pot or pan will give you a "pasta and sauce" dish in ten to fifteen minutes. And it works. Sort of. Your instinct matches my experience: ...


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I'm going to give a different answer than the one I gave in the question that Stephie referenced: Yes, you (most likely) need to cook the fresh pasta. The problem is that for the other case to work, you need to at the very least dry the pasta first before you use it. If you don't, the moisture will just turn the pasta into paste. For typical lasagne, ...


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Whether the pasta is rolled for cannelloni or flat for lasagne won't make a difference, just make sure that the tops of the rolls are covered with sauce, too, or they will dry out and taste not nice. For the pros and cons of fresh vs. dried pasta in "al forno" dishes, see the almost duplicate lasagne Q/A.


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The 4th version you gave is optimal from a chemistry standpoint; the process of using heat to melt a soft fat and dissolve a powder into a liquid by stirring is going to be at it's most efficient when the ingredients can fully interact with each other without all that pasta in the way. It seems the main issue at hand here is the 10-15 minute wait for ...


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Per the mass market/tv ads - with red sauce of some sort. Per I hate tomato sauce on pasta, not in my house. Just cheese is one method - I prefer a sharp cheddar, but am happy enough with a pecorino romano that's more convenient (seems fine if purchased grated/powdered, kept in fridge) while the sharp cheddar needs to be grated onto the pasta. Most ...


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Over the years I have extruded pasta hung on poles and let dry for 12 to 24 hours. Room temperature and humidity is what it's all about I have found that on humid days the pasta dried slower and was very strong. On low humidity days it would break and not be strong at all. I haver extruded over 100,000 pounds using semolina eggs and water. Weigh your ...


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I don't think there's anything wrong with your pasta dough. It's on the dry side of the spectrum, which makes it go through the roller easily without sticking, but it won't work well in an extruder. The edge cracking is normal, and you can always cut it off if desired. You can reduce cracking by working it to the full width of the machine at the ...


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Syneresis is likely the culprit here: the extraction or expulsion of a liquid from a gel, as when serum drains from a contracting clot of blood. Another example of syneresis is the collection of whey on the surface of yogurt. Syneresis can also be observed when the amount of diluent in a swollen polymer exceeds the solubility limit as the temperature ...


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I'll added this as a comment, but it's probably close enough to a full answer, so I'll post it as one. My homemade pasta recipe is a little different. I initially got it from America's Test Kitchen TV show. I think they have a couple of different ones, but if I remember correctly off the top of my head, it's 2 cups of flour and 3 whole eggs. It's always a ...



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