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It depends on your ingredients how long you simmer the sauce. A meat ragu needs time for the meats to cook and the connective tissues to beak down. That is how you get the tasty little meat bits and not hard dry hunks.. Time. You simmer out the excess moisture until the sauce is at the right consistany. If you are too thick and the meat isn't ready, add ...


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Although nowadays both are ubiquitous in Italy (and abroad), dried pasta and fresh egg pasta are traditionally associated with different regions of Italy. Dried durum-wheat pasta originated in the old Kingdom of the two Sicilies, which encompassed the entire Southern Italy, including the island of Sicily, and had its capital city in Naples. Oldest ...


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It's not recent at all, for example lasagne are documented in ancient times. Also dried pasta as spaghetti is very antique. The term lasagne, or, rarely, the singular lasagna (from Old Greek àganon, λάγανον) generally denotes egg noodles cut into large squares or rectangles. They are typically used for casserole dishes. It is a dish of antique origin, ...


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I have three thoughts relating to your dilemma, and I have some bad news. I think the execution of these noodles relies on techology and an ingredient you may find difficult to aquire and utilize. Starches go through a variety of predictable physical changes when water, fat, and heat are introduced to them. (There are many well-written posts about this.) ...


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There are many kinds of pasta. Some are made from flour and water. Some are made from flour and eggs. Sometimes there is oil in the recipe. Some have other ingredients such as spinach or chilli, for colour and flavour. Pasta made with egg is somewhat richer tasting, and of course the yolk adds colour. None of these is more "traditional" than any other. ...


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I second SAJ14SAJ but have my disagreement on oat flour vs all purpose. Oats do have gluten and in fact 14% gluten so unless you are using a gluten free oat flour you should use similar amounts as you would whole wheat flour because of similar percentages.


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Once again I will bring up America's Test Kitchen (AKA Cook's Illustrated). They like the no-boil sheets, but they have experienced some of the same problems already brought up here. To ameliorate those issues, they recommend soaking the sheets for 10 minutes in hot tap water before use. I've done it, it works great.


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I used dry sheets in cooking but found them hard in places where perhaps the sauce had not reached them so decided next time to boil first as per the packet instructions for 10 mins. Most of them stuck together so ended up with about 50% not useable - a right pain. Give up - I will use fresh next time.



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