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13

The definitive source for Sous Vide information on the web at the moment is Douglas Baldwin's wonderful A Practical Guide to Sous Vide. It has wonderful safety information and goes well beyond the 'recipe' side of Sous Vide. It's pretty much the bible (since Modernist Cuisine is too expensive). Based on the information he has on pasteurizing eggs, I would ...


10

If you've found a very old recipe that calls for scalding for food safety reasons, then yes, it is probably unnecessary. However, there are places where it is called for. In particular, when making Béchamel (which is made by combining milk and roux), it is important to scald or at least warm the milk, otherwise you can and most likely will end up with ...


8

The process of pasteurizing milk is to treat it with heat to kill microorganisms such as Brucella, Campylobacter, E. coli O157:H7, Listeria, Mycobacterium bovis, Salmonella, and Yersinia that may or may not be in the milk. This is a precautionary step that is taken when you are not 100% sure whether your source of milk is disease free. Pasteurization can ...


7

Wikipedia has also other uses for Scalded milk besides killing bacteria: Uses Scalded milk is called for in the original recipes for béchamel sauce, to prevent the sauce from thickening excessively. Since these early recipes predate pasteurization, this was a necessary step. Scalded milk is used in bread to make a more tender loaf. Scalded milk is used in ...


6

Unfortunately, the usual store bought pasteurised milk undergoes a process that kills virtually everything needed for coagulation to occur, which basically means making cheese becomes a whole lot harder. The cheese you buy from stores that is made from pasteurised milk is either made from low heat pasteurisation or by the addition of additional ingredients, ...


6

Healthier is a loaded word in this case. The raw milk camp claims a richer flavor, more nutrients, and less allergies. The pasteurized camp claims just as nutritious, with better texture, but safer. Once all the practicalities of producing, distributing, and ensuring the quality of large quantities of milk come into play, the debate becomes fierce. What ...


5

I used to drink raw milk. 20 minutes after it was "extracted". It was the best milk I ever had. The key here is finding a trustworthy source. Just like with any other food it should not be contaminated with harmful bacteria. And like pasteurized milk - you'll get cottage cheese if you let it sit unrefrigerated. Also some countries/states have laws about ...


5

The theory is to pasteurize them sous-vide at 57ºC for 1:15'. You must be able to control the temperature, so specialized equipment is needed (ronner or similar). The resulting egg has a different texture than ordinary (and I believe it tastes more 'yolky'). I've kept homemade mayo for more than two weeks without problem (off smell / taste). Custards are ...


5

You ain't going to get anything like that into the states legally - not with the chance of livestock still being viable in there. It doesn't need pasteurising,it needs paralyzing before it will get past US customs. You might get some included as a component of a cooked product, if the paperwork assures customs it doesn't actually cause death. If you want a ...


5

Pasteurisation is about using heat to kill (harmful) bacteria in raw products. The short answer is 'Yes, you can'. The question is how, or how long should you heat the milk. A quick look at the Wikipedia provides some answers. In the HTST process, milk is forced between metal plates or through pipes heated on the outside by hot water, and is heated to ...


4

Even if it is possible, it is a very, very bad idea as you don't know what cultures or pathogens are in the already spoiled milk. Fermented dairy products should only be made from fresh milk in good condition—and in most cases, that milk should be pasteurized while fresh absolutely as soon as possible from the source cows.


3

There's different types of pasteurization -- you can heat it up a lot, for a short period time, or hold it at a lower temperature for longer. Scalding the milk makes sure you denature the proteins, no matter the type of pasteurization used, which can affect how some breads rise, so in baking, if it calls for scalded milk, I still scald the milk. In a cream ...


2

The advantage with the raw milk is since there is no heat applied, you do not lose any nutritional value. I cannot tell you about the health side though. If you are not drinking pasteurized milk you have to make sure of the source of the raw milk. Also, note that, there are two types of pasteurization, there is the normal pasteurization where the milk is ...


2

What Zepplock said. If you know it came from healthy cows, recently, and was well cared for in the interim, then it's great stuff. Otherwise, you're essentially picking up a random petri dish and drinking it. Good luck with that...


2

Most pasteurization is done at temperatures under 165F and does not damage the milk proteins enough to prevent coagulation. Milk that has been heated past 165F will be labeled as Ultra Pasteurized and is likely to not be suitable for cheese making because too many casein molecules will have denatured and will be unable to bond with the calcium in the milk. ...


2

The microwave is too harsh an environment for this. Pasteurize them in the shell, in a large pot of water on the stove. You must bring the water up to 140 - 150 F (60 - 65 C) for 3 to 5 minutes to pasteurize them. You must not exceed 150 or you will begin to cook the egg. If the eggs are in the water as you heat it then they will closely match the ...


2

The reason I now scald my milk when making pies, custard and quiches: (I hope I can express this correctly) It isn't just about thickening the liquid or a jump start. I now scald my milk 20 to 30 minutes at 185 degrees F. I use a candy thermometer gently stirring all the while. This scalding process has made all the difference in my pies, custard and ...


2

It depends on what is to be pasteurized. If one aims for pasteurizing the surface only, then the shape is more or less unimportant. If however one wants to pasteurize the core, then the shape will affect the times. To be on the safe size, measure the thickness where the meat is thickest. Myhrwold writes in ...


2

Not THE answer, but: A state-by-state map of raw milk laws in the United States


1

It is safer and helps increase the shelf life of the milk. Otherwise the milk will pass through dangerous temperatures and and may be recolonized with air born pathogens. These will grow rapidly during the period the milk is warm, and more slowly once it is refrigerated. While the milk may not become immediately unsafe or unpalatable, its storage ...


1

Pasteurisation requires fine control over temperature which would be very tricky at home. According to 'Davidson's Safest Choice Eggs' at www.safeeggs.com, in North Carolina pasteurised eggs are available at Lowes Foods and Harris Teeter. That will hopefully mean more to you than it does to me! As for shelf life, I would imagine there are few negative ...


1

The only guaranteed safe method is just to buy eggs pasteurized in the shell. IMHO, well worth the slightly higher price.


1

I've seen some recipes that use cultured buttermilk, stirred into the milk as an agent to acidify everything before adding the rennet. I'd say this is your best bet. pasteurization isn't sterilization, so some types of bacteria may survive, but you have more of a chance to get an infection from something undesirable, I would wager. No actual experience ...


1

Pasteurization does kill helpful bacteria along with any pathogens, and it also destroys vitamins (Kilshaw et al 1982). And also see wikipedia. Other than the effect of pasteurization on the milk per se, it is worth considering the health of the cows. Raw milk is more likely to be available from small herds that are pasture grazed, and more easily obtained ...


1

According to our midwife, raw milk (and cheese made from raw milk) is not recommended during pregnancy, because there's a slight probability of catching a particular family of germs that can be harmful to the unborn. (Unfortunately, I forgot which family that is.) Raw milk definitely is quite alive with a lot of things. Short of extensive microbiological ...



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