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47

Abstract: Ganache is delicious, but not everyone eats dairy. We examined whether coconut milk can be used for the creation of a non-dairy ganache. We ran a series of experiments. The answer is that, with some creative techniques, you can use it, but it does not come anywhere near to the real thing. Introduction. Someone wrote a question on Seasoned advice ...


38

Inspired by rumtscho's incredibly detailed answer, which provided some informative although not quite "marketable" results, I set off on my own set of experiments. They are not quite finished, but I'll update this answer as more gets uncovered. First of all, I decided to start my experiments with coconut cream by itself because, why waste perfectly good ...


15

Technically, this is not precisely buttermilk, but it's pretty close in both composition and usage. The term "buttermilk" can actually refer to a wide range of fermented milk varieties. Traditionally, buttermilk was produced by allowing natural bacteria present in cream to ferment some of the sugar lactose into lactic acid. This made churning butter from ...


14

The final word! After a few hours of experimenting today, this is what I discovered: No "standard" alcohol burns hot enough to caramelize the sugar using a reasonable small amount (i.e. less than 1 tbsp). Since there's an open flame, it will probably eventually caramelize the sugar, but the amount of alcohol required to burn that long makes the ...


13

I was inspired to follow an Herve This recipe for Chocolate Chantilly using coconut milk. Here is a piccy of the end result. It looks and tastes how I imagine a whipped ganache would. I had to make some modifications to the original recipe. Here are the details: 60g semi-sweet (70%) chocolate 100 ml coconut milk 2 tbsp coconut butter cream One bowl of ...


10

1- To work with phyllo or yufka sheets the key is to keep them from drying out. A damp, but not dripping, towel laid over the sheets is essential. Cover it after each time you take out a sheet. They dry out very fast and then just disintegrate. 2- The butter should be melted but not hot. Many recipes call for it to be clarified as well but I don't ...


9

Croissant purists state 32 is the "perfect" number of layers a croissant should have. In this link seeking the croissant perfection, you can find: NOTE11, I had the misconception that the more folds, the more layers, the flakier it will be. Wrong. With too many folds, butter layers would be thinner and thinner, and it will be more likely for the butter ...


8

I was lucky enough to get a macaron session from a Michelin-starred pastry chef before Christmas and he gave me some invaluable tips. Use an Italian meringue recipe. In other words, pour warm sugar syrup on to the egg whites instead of sugar from the cupboard. The eggs will already have been 'cooked' into structure and will not require any crusting. They ...


8

The glaze on most fruit tarts is just melted jelly. Given the small quantity involved, you probably wouldn't particularly notice the apple flavour. However, there's no reason you couldn't use another type of jelly if you preferred. If you take a look at many fruit juice blends, you'll note that the base is usually apple, even when that's not the ...


8

This is because you are using a microwave. In theory, if you could turn off the microwaves in the microwave oven, you could use the convection function to bake things. In practice, we have had several questions which indicate that this is not how convection microwaves work. They keep nuking your dough, making it inedible. In your case, they are cooking all ...


8

Flakiness in pastry is usually achieved by careful incorporation of butter at the correct temperature. Cold cubes of butter are cut into the flour, cold water (or milk) is added, and then the pastry is rolled out, flattening the butter pieces. These pieces act to separate layers of the flour and liquid mixture. The butter then melts during cooking, ...


8

With great skill, a true artist could do what you describe with Thai/Vietnamese rice paper, the dinner plate sized, extra thin ones, like for Fresh Spring Rolls. I will never apply for the job, I promise.


8

I respect Jolenealaska's creative thought, but nothing truly resembling pastry is going to be translucent or transparent unless it is exceedingly thin. The structure alone will refract light, making the product opaque in the same way snow is opaque even though individual water crystals are fairly transparent, if they don't have air inclusions. This is ...


7

The difference is that in sfogliatelle the filling is made of Ricotta cheese, while in the Lobster Tail the filling is made of French cream. Lobster Tail is not something prepared in Italy; you find it on New York City. I had to ask to friend of mine living in USA, to know what Lobster Tail pastry is.


7

Whenever you're worried about something crisp being made soggy by something moist, the answer is usually fat. Brush the crust with butter or oil before you add the pears, and the oil will slow the absorption of water. Alternately, dry out your pears. Cook them a bit. Roll them in sugar to dry them out some. I'm surprised the pear juice is making it through ...


6

I've seen a lot of tart recipes that call for melted apricot jam/jelly as the glaze. It's similarly elusive flavor-wise to apple jelly, and doesn't stand out as a flavor on its own. My guess is that in a more industrial setting apple is more likely, though, as it's generally cheaper and more readily available in large quantities.


6

There are four common ways to make fruit-flavored ganaches: Use the zest of the fruit Zest the fruit (works best for cirtus) and place the zest in the cream as it is brought to a simmer. Strain out the zest and use the cream. Use reduced juice Fruit juice from almost any fruit may be used as a liquid flavoring in ganache. The fruit juice should be heated ...


6

One strong possibility is that the recipe is overleavened, which will cause it to blow up fast and then collapse. BakeWise (by Shirley Corriher) recommends 1 teaspoon baking powder or 1/4 teaspoon baking soda per cup of flour as a guideline. If your recipe is much beyond that, suspect that is the issue.


6

What you want is cream with 35%-40% milkfat, and no gelatine or other stabilizers for whipping. If you use a lighter cream, then it will not have the rich, creamy texture, and evenly thick consistency you seek. In fact, if you use a light enough cream, it will not thicken properly. Now we enter the murky realm of regional naming differences, trying to ...


6

Those are Pan Pistacchio - this blog entry (not mine) has a picture of a sign in a shop window identifying them. It goes on to say that the general category of these buns is Fishermans Buns or Pan del Pescatore and that the green ones specifically are pistachio, which matches what I saw in Venice myself - the pistachio ones were always green and there were ...


6

If you want the least obtrusive flavor, the best you can go with is thickened water. While you can probably prepare sheets with the right hydrocolloid and lots of care and plastic foil, I would suggest choosing a thickener which thickens on cooling, and pouring the warm mixture over the pie. Arrowroot starch is frequently used in this role on fruit pies, I ...


5

Sometimes, in the less refined areas, you'll get pastries with sugar syrup brushed on top with the egg. It gives a shine to the pastry that lasts for a long time, protects it from losing moisture and makes it sweeter. This is why all the industrial pastries are usually so sweet. I don't think that any traditional European patisseries have ever used Agave ...


5

This is not necessarily under baked. What you made is a perfect creme puff. The dough in the middle is not raw- it has just been steamed from the inside instead of being dried and crisped the way the exterior was. There is usually very little such dough on the inside and the filling hides it. Many creme puff recipes call for scooping out the soft dough ...


5

The answer to this question is essentially the same as the question "how do you make croissants". If you are making croissants du boulanger, the dough has yeast in it; if you are making croissants du pattissier, the dough does not have yeast in it. The fact that croissants can be made without yeast shows that the yeast itself is not essential to the oven ...


5

They will certainly be safe assuming your freezer has operated properly throughout the last year. Some quality degradation is possible, especially freezer burn on the outside if they were not wrapped extremely well. A buildup of visible frost inside the wrapping is a sign this is extremely likely, although it can happen even without the buildup. Rancidity ...


5

The raw potato will definitely cook through. If you cooked the potatoes first, they would be almost devoid of texture by the time they cooked a second time in the oven - you'd have something more akin to mashed-potato pastries on your hands. You might want to think about sweating the onions first, though. Sweating them would drive-off some of their ...


4

Similar to a macaroon, whip egg whites with cream of tartar and season with whatever savory spices and herbs you might like before folding with the corn flakes, corn chips, or crushed tortilla chips, and then bake at a low temperature until crisp and dry but not browned.


4

I think it is completely possible to make this work. The key is going to be finding the right amount of sugar and alcohol to use. You'll want to determine this in advance, but I assume you don't want to make a bunch of creme brulee to practice on. So here's what you do. Make a bunch of cheap vanilla pudding and use that as a standin in your ramekins for the ...


4

The only usual topping on a croissant is a brush of egg to give it a golden finish. I suspect the sweetness you are detecting may be due to sweeter-tasting, European butter.



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