New answers tagged

1

Either your pastry should be hot and your syrup at room temperature or the other way around. This is a good rule of thumb for all syrup soaked pastries. If both the baklava and syrup are hot when you pour the syrup over you will end up with a goopy mess.


0

If you cannot make your electric cooktop work satisfactorily: -Single induction hobs or camping gas stoves (disclaimer: some aren't certified for indoor use. And the induction plates are stronger anyway) are available around €30/$30 in most places. -You could use a kettle (or a pot on another hobplate) to boil the water before you add it to the butter - ...


0

That is called 'pastry cream'. In yotuve, look for 'pastry cream by Gretchen's bakery'. Hope that helps.


0

If a firm, finely textured, somewhat cookie-ish texture is acceptable (compare hand-sized, storebought mince pies), try hot water shortcrust. Just do not overbake it or make it too thick, it can turn hard as hardtack that way.


3

As others have mentioned, for savory pastries, there are various types of crusts that are meant to be held in the hand, and are thus not likely to be either flaky or crumbly. Examples are pasties, calzones, or even pizza. For sweet pastries, you could look into the sort of pastry used for, e.g. Hungarian-style apple pie (almás lepény). Granted, this isn't ...


2

The non-flaky, non-crumbly crust is hot water pastry. This king of pastry is used extensively in Scotland both for savoury pies like Scotch (mutton) pies or for sweet pies like rhubarb. It is a lard-based crust. You should be able to get a recipe by searching for "scotch pie recipe"


1

I don't know if there's a particular name for the crust, but most hand pies would have something closer to what you're looking for. They have to be a bit more elastic, as they need to hold up to being stretched over the pie without the support of a pie pan. You can find things by searching for 'hand pie crust' or 'pocket pie crust' on the internet, as ...


-1

I have read applesauce could be a great substitute for butter in baking. Its 68 calories per 100g, which is less than a tenth of the calories you would get from margarine and without the trans fat. The ratio from what I have read is 1:1 to butter.


0

I make my pie crust by following my basic biscuit recipe minus any baking soda or powder. It makes a beautiful flaky crust. I can't tell from your question if that's what you are looking for or looking to avoid, but that's what I do.


4

Normally, pies are done with pie crusts, and they do have the crust types you describe. But you can certainly add pie filling to some other type of crust and enjoy the result, if that's what you prefer. Typical doughs used for crusts would be: millefeuille dough is the most common variant, sometimes also seen as direct substitution for people who don't ...


4

What you are looking for is typically considered a kitchen mistake: Overkneading. Not-so gentle handling of the dough and some kneading plus a bit more eggs or a dash of milk will add density. There is actually one special use case where bakers go for that more elastic and less crumbly dough: Cornish Pasties Straight from the Cornish Pasty Association, ...


1

In the UK we don't have Earth Balance, and often DF margerine on it's own is too soft, even when chilled: I find a mix of dairy-free margarine and vegetable shortening works - I've not made pastry yet, however for "buttercream" icing I do a 50/50 mixture. Hope this helps!


1

There are good quality vegan margarines (Earth balance, Alsan) on the market nowadays, often they are of the interesterified instead of the hydrogenated variety. They are designed to behave and taste similar to butter instead of (as many cheap margarines seem to do) staying spreadable at temperatures where butter would be very firm. Unlike pure coconut or ...


-1

There are machines for this. You can buy a kadayif(kunefe) dessert pattern maker, it is available online. However, it is somewhat expensive, around 140 USD.



Top 50 recent answers are included