Hot answers tagged

9

By far the easiest method is to use a pan of hot water and a bowl of ice water. Essentially, bring a pan of water (enough water to cover the peach to a boil. Meanwhile, with a sharp knife, make a small 'X' shaped incision in the top and bottom of each peach. When the water is boiling gently place a few of the peaches into the water and simmer for around 20 ...


9

I've never heard of anyone trying to de-fuzz a peach, so this isn't a direct answer: It might be simpler to just use nectarines. It's a myth that it's a cross between a peach and a plum. They are the exact same species, the nectarine is just a peach with the fuzzless recessive genes.


9

Meh, How Bad Could it Be? Been eating peaches with these things for as long as I can remember. I seem perfectly fine and nothing ever happened to ... OMG ALIENS!! AHHH!!! Harmless Callus Tissue Anyways, more seriously, they're absolutely harmless and are just extra tissue called callus tissue, as sourced from these: ...


8

My opinion- I haven't done rigorous testing: Canning softens the interior of the peach but when I have (in my laziness) left the skins on they stay tough and quite unpleasant tasting. I doubt it has any effect on the longevity of the product but it would make it a little less pleasant and versatile.


7

You can use an old tooth-brush it will give better results


5

I'm having a look on here, already being a member on the Garden and Landscaping section. My horticultural knowledge tells me those white bits aren't anything to worry about, they're just callus tissue (bits of undifferentiated cells) which are not uncommon in the flesh around peach pits. I'll admit the picture isn't a sufficiently good close up to see ...


5

Freezing 1) Wash and peel the ripened peaches. Peel them the same way you do tomatoes - boil water, drop the peaches in for 1 minute, then drop them into ice water. The skin should just slide right off. Slice in half and remove pits. You can leave them in halves, quarter them, or slice them. I prefer slices. 2) Mix w/ sugar & ascorbic acid. Dissolve ...


4

Torani Peach Syrup! It's readily available online or at coffee shop supply outlets. Amazon link


4

You don't HAVE to peel the peaches to can them, that's just how most people prefer them. I've canned them with the peel on and it turns the syrup a lovely pink colour, and as far as I could tell, didn't affect the taste of the peaches.


3

Simple... drop the freshly picked peaches in cold water in the sink and wash them with clear water and a dishcloth as you would a dish. It isn't difficult (quick and easy) and you keep all the nutrients that are contained in the skin.


3

I know of two techniques: you may blanch the peaches or you may use a serrated peeler. Blanching the peaches makes it easier to peel them. Make a cross on the top of the peach, dip it into hot water for 30 seconds, remove to ice cold water, pull off the peel. Blanching may impart a slight cooked flavor to raw peaches. Another technique is to use a ...


3

Quarter or eighth, lay out on a baking sheet, freeze overnight, and bag. They will keep frozen for a year. My mom used to make a pie crust and put a bag in the crust, fill with peaches, seal the peach bag, bag the whole thing and stuff it in the chest freezer. Then, in the depths of winter, you could whip out a peach pie in about as long as it takes to ...


2

I've never seen a recipe, but I suspect it was made the same way most other soda is: peach syrup + carbonated water. You can buy the syrup from places that sell it for making snow cones, but that might be more expensive than rolling your own (peach flavor + some acid + sugar). Good luck.


2

It's probably one of these mixed with carbonated water: Simple syrup and artificial peach flavor Concentrated peach juice (probably with added sugar)


2

I would recommend a vegetable brush like you would use to clean dirt off of potatoes.


2

The last few years, I've canned both peaches and pears leaving the skins on. They are a bit tough after canning but I love them both that way. I also don't add sugar to the water unless I'm canning them for someone else. If the peaches are ripe, they taste fresh off the tree. Awhile back, Dr. Oz told his audience the 5 fruits that are high in sugar content ...


2

Yes, basically anything cooked will last at least a few days in the fridge. If you want it to safely keep it longer than that, you can freeze it. It's probably best not to try to reprocess the jars though, since you don't know exactly how much water got in (and how much acid and sugar got out), so if you're unlucky it could upset the recipe enough to make ...


2

If I gave you any number I'd be almost certainly wrong - peaches come in many different sizes. (And personally I'm led to believe that any recipe that gives only a number like "8 peaches" is either crap because is's imprecise or tolerates a lot of difference.) So I suggest you either find a recipe with a weight My first guess is jams that often use equal ...


1

I bet you can puree some peaches and their juice to use in place of the butter and water, respectively. Although, the texture might be better if you only replace half of the butter. I wouldn't recommend replacing the eggs with peaches because that would make the cake quite crumbly. Note that the peaches can make the cake a lot sweeter, especially if ...


1

Blanching should make it very easy to peel the peaches. Descrip Video When I blanch tomatoes, the critical thing is to leave them in the boiling water long enough so that the skin splits and will simply pop off with a little pressure from your hand. Things should work the same way w peaches, and it's not really all that bad of a chore.


1

I too like the skin for nutrition and color. I've found to fill a bucket half full of peaches. Next turn on your water hose to get that hard fsst spray and wash the fuzz out of them. It doesn't remove it all but that left is negligiible. Now you don't have to peel them, You have a beautiful color for your jam/jelly/cobbler and after boiling and ...


1

I use a damp paper towel. Typically I give the peach a rinse in case there are pesticides, then rub them with a paper towel which I compost. It's one of the few things I use paper towels for, but I find it works better than a cloth in this case.


1

Very sharp knife. Poach first, then peel. (Briefly plunge into boiling water.)



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