Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Peanut butter is just ground roasted peanuts essentially. The american style peanut butter tends to be sweetened, as well as having extra oil and salt. But they are only slight flavour/texture enhancers (not that I think sugar enhances it, UK peanut butter is unsweetened usually). Satay sauces are essentially just peanut butter sauces, roast some peanuts, ...


12

Unshelled peanuts are salted simply by soaking in brine. Some of the salt (and water) gets through the shell, which is a bit porous. They're then re-dried and roasted. I suppose the roasting is optional, but if you're adding salt you clearly want flavor, and that's what roasting's for too. There's a Serious Eats post with a bit more detail if you're curious. ...


10

No, peanuts are not nuts in the botanical sense. They are legumes, much like peas or beans. Chestnuts and acorns are examples of true nuts. Most of what we commonly refer to as nuts are botanically drupes, including walnuts, almonds and cherries, as well as some larger fruits like peaches (which are typically eaten for their flesh, rather than their ...


7

Peanut sauce is one of my very most favorite condiments, I practically consider it a major food group, and I moved from the US to live in another country where peanut butter is not available. Roasted & shelled peanuts are however bountiful and cheap, luckily, so I just learned to make my own peanut sauce. Here's how I make a simple and fast peanut ...


6

Alton Brown just generally prefers kosher salt, for reasons that don't really apply to peanut butter, which will be ground down anyway. What matters is the total weight of salt. Remember, kosher salt tends to weight approximately 1/2 as much (depending on brand) as table salt, per unit of volume. So you can replace the kosher salt with sea salt, or any ...


6

I don't think I've ever seen peanut butter grow mold, natural or commercial, refrigerated or not. What will happen with natural peanut butter is that the fat (of which there's plenty) will go rancid over time. The oxidation process that leads to rancidity requires heat, light, and usually oxygen; keeping it in the refrigerator will therefore slow the ...


6

I am answering my own question with information I have gathered after doing some of my own research. Several hand mills claim to make peanut butter, but the mill that seems to have the best public following and reviews for flour making, the Country Living Grain Mill, does not claim to make peanut butter in their marketing literature. I contacted the ...


5

Properly stored, dry roasted nuts should lose none of their flavour. Keep them in a well sealed container and they will be fine. Spices, however, should be freshly toasted, because the point of doing so is to encourage them to release their flavourful oils.


4

This answer is a bit redundant given some of the comments on the accepted answer, but still: Get a brand of peanut butter that's just peanuts. The one I get most of the time is Adam's, but Kraft has one, I've seen Maranatha products, but didn't know they made peanut butter until now. It shouldn't be hard to find something that will work for you.


4

In the book "Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian", Madhur says one of the few uses she's found for a plain microwave oven is to roast cashews. She dresses them in a little bit of oil, then spreads them out on a plate in a single layer and cooks them in the microwave oven until they turn brown. I assume dressing them in a little bit of oil helps browning. I ...


4

Per Pick your own (emphasis added): Store it in the refrigerator until you use it. It should keep for a month or two. You can also freeze it. It will keep indefinitely in the freezer. In both cases, you may need to stir the peanut butter to mix the oils back in (the oil tends to separate over time). And no, you cannot "can" the peanut butter - it is ...


4

You can most generally shell peanuts with your hands. There are different methods you can do depending on how sturdy the shells are. 1- If the shells are sturdy, hold each side of the neck (if you know what I mean) with each hand, and then break it apart. Now you have two shells with peanuts in them but there is a hole in each shell. Take one of them and ...


4

I've made peanut butter cookies with various "all natural" peanut butters, containing no extra oil/fat, just peanuts and possibly salt. They didn't split. I suppose the recipe you're looking at could be somehow different but it seems really unlikely. I haven't even seen splitting in cooked sauces using these kinds of peanut butter, along with plenty of other ...


4

The previous answer which says to toast something means to brown it is accurate. The difference between roast and toast is simple, really: roast means to expose something to dry heat (in the west, usually in an oven) and to cook whatever it is right through; toast means to brown the outside of something, either held over a fire (as in marshmallows) or placed ...


3

To toast something is to cause it to gain color through the application of heat. That's it. To toast a peanut is just like toasting a piece of bread. It can be done in the oven or on the stovetop, with or without oil. The difference between the words "roasting" and "toasting" is subtle and the words are often used interchangeably, but the true meanings ...


3

As @Carey Gregory already mentioned about McDonald's, I generally cook for 6-10 people and for small kitty and birthday parties, so for that I use a manual nut chopper (with size adjustment bolt). This gives me fine results of chopped nuts almost in equal shapes. For 2-5 servings, I simply use a sharp knife to chop them. I almost every time try to make them ...


3

I would imagine the commercial choppers used for McDonald's nuts generate the same amount of dust. They probably sell that dust for some other purpose. The dust should be easy enough to remove: just shake them around in a strainer.


3

These are not hand grinders, but you can try a "wet grinder", but they are very slow (takes hours to make a few jars). If you don't mind ordering from a Chinese factory (assuming the freight is not exorbitant), you can view some real Peanut Butter machines here: ...


3

I can understand that grinding nuts into butter without the use of electricity has it's ecological, and other merits, but after having made many batches of peanut butter with a Champion Juicer, I can attest that it takes a pretty powerful engine (or arm ) with plenty of endurance to get a good consistency and a generous quantity. The cleaning of any grinder ...


3

The shells are not used in making peanut butter. You would need to shell these peanuts (and remove the papery skins from the individual peanuts) before grinding them to make the peanut butter. It doesn't matter whether they are roasted in the shell or not--what matters is that they are roasted, to give the deeper, richer flavor. I have to assume your ...


3

The best peanut butter, in my subjective opinion, contains peanuts and nothing else. Liquidize the nuts in a food processor until it's as smooth as you want it; and you're done. Peanut butter made this way might go a bit stiff if you leave it, but give it a good stir and it'll go back to normal. Good wholefood brands sell ready-made peanut butter of this ...


3

You've pretty much answered your own question. Put the PB in a blender, drizzle in a little peanut oil, blitz and season to taste with salt and a little sugar if you want it. I'd add them all slowly: you can always add, you can't take away.


3

Nuts are much tastier when they are roasted. Dehydrating may be ok but it will not do the same thing for their flavor or texture. Nuts have a lot of oil but there is not enough on their exterior for powders to stick to. Of course some of the powder would stick anyway- and with parmesan even more would when the cheese melted. If you are ok with a milder ...


3

Well, you could shell out for a commercial nut butter mill, if you had an extra thousand bucks lying around. But otherwise the answer is probably not. I believe that commercial peanut butter makers grind the nuts between metal plates, which gives the very fine texture. At home, you're presumably using a food processor, which can't make thick-textured pastes ...


3

While the grinding of peanuts produces a paste we call peanut butter, a food processor may be slightly better equipped to handle them then a coffee grinder, especially if you want to blend coffee with it again. Peppercorns are harder and they can be done in a coffee grinder, but peanuts would likely result in a mess that would not easily be cleaned, and ...


2

Peanut butters that are not "all natural" include cheaper oils along with sugar and emulsifiers to keep the mixture from separating and to make it lighter and smoother. That lack of emulsifiers could make a huge difference but it depends a lot on the recipe. In a normal cookie dough fat is creamed with sugar and eggs are beaten in one at a time which adds ...


2

Salt is salt if dissolved into a liquid or blended into a paste. Kosher salt is just larger crystals, it tastes and works the same as any other salt. It is mostly called for because it has become "fashionable". Kosher salt does have specific culinary uses, but not as a dissolved or blended ingredient. There is no global standard on table or kosher salt ...


2

In this context, for peanuts, there is no real difference. Feel free to use the store-bought roasted peanuts, or roast your own.


2

I don't know what type of coffee grinder you have, but if there's the remotest chance of your efforts resulting in "Peanut Butter", you should ask yourself... "How in the world am I gonna clean this mess out of there"? Yuk!


1

In general, I think of 'toasting' as finishing the cooking process in something that has already been through several steps. Toasting baked bread for example. Roasting to me implies taking something from start to finish. With peanuts, it could be that they expect you to take already roasted nuts and then toast them (perhaps with sugar or something). It also ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible