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10

Pectin is a polysacharide found in the cell walls of plants. There are two main divisions of pectin used in cooking: high methoxyl (HM) and low methoxyl (LM). The high methoxyl is used in most jam and jelly recipes. It requires sugar and acid to gel. When the pectin is dissolved out of the cell walls it is very dilute and picks up a negative charge that ...


9

Fruits that are high in pectin are not necessarily sour and sour fruits are not necessarily high in pectin. However, pectin is typically found in high concentrations in firm fleshed fruit such as apples and in the skins of citrus. Unripe fruit has even more than the ripe. So- I can see why you would come to that conclusion. It is easy enough to find charts ...


6

Lemon curd is not cooked so much for a time—in general times are only guidelines to help cooks not yet familiar with a recipe do planning—as they are to a specific outcome. The traditional test for lemon curd (and all custards, really) is the nappe, or coating the back of a spoon. If you dip a spoon into the curd, and then run your finger ...


6

Yes. See the accepted answer for Can most sour fruits be jelled by cooking with sugar?. After getting that answer, I have successfully made apple jelly with fresh cooked and strained apple juice and sugar, and nothing else. You can search for apple jelly recipes and find directions.


5

I have done this before and it has worked for me. It should work, but if it doesn't, I know what will. My aunt sold Jam for a while and when the pectin didn't work she reheated and added a small amount of gelatin, I helped her stir it in, and that was the final fix for her bad mix.


4

There are many causes for the jam being grainy, but most commonly, as @hobodave suggested, is due to inadequate dissolution of sugar. The test is simple. Get some jam into a bowl, add a little bit of water, stir, does it resolve the problem? If yes, then it is a dissolution problem. There, you may want to change the method of making that jam -- if your ...


4

I don't know for sure if it is the same enzyme naturally that naturally occurs in apples, but there is a commercial product called NovoShape that serves this purpose. It is a pectin esterase. You can find it in small quantities at Modernist Pantry: http://www.modernistpantry.com/novoshape.html


3

I found a site with another cranberry sauce maker complaining of the end product being too runny. What I learned is that cranberries have lots of natural pectin that is released when they are cooked past bursting. If it were me, I would: cook it some more, keeping it at a boil but watching it carefully so it doesn't boil over and does not start to ...


3

Were your blueberries grainy? I occasionally get a pint that have a grainy texture. I've heard that this means they aren't quite fresh, but they usually taste just fine despite the texture. I'm not sure if this particular graininess translates to a jam though. Jam can also get grainy from sugar that isn't fully dissolved. This can happen more easily with ...


3

Graininess caused by excess undissolved sugar is fairly obvious. The grains will be sweet and will dissolve on the tongue. Alternatively, with some fruit including blueberries, the skins of the fruit can be dry or tough and stay in grainy fragments in the jam. Again, this is obvious. The individual shreds will be dark and flat, etc. Another, in my opinion, ...


2

Have you tried using a candy thermometer and testing the jam when it's at 220°F? An alternative to the method that you use is to use a spoon and do the 'two drop test'. If you dip a cold metal spoon into your jam mix and then lift it. When the mixture is only just boiling it will drip off and be light. As the mixture continues to heat the drops that fall ...


2

You could try a gourmet grilled cheese sandwich! If it's very sweet, you could combine it with a more savory cheese and perhaps a fruit like fig. It reminds me of something the patron saint of grilled cheese would use on her blog: http://www.grilledcheesesocial.com/.


2

This would probably be good as an ingredient in a barbecue sauce, assuming the jelly will mix into the other components.


2

If you have a bit of sun (as it is a summertime method); * Pour the jam into a tray and leave it under the sun for some days. Check and stir the jam time to time until it reaches to desired thichness. *The top of the tray should be covered with a thin cotton cloth/muslin in case any dust etc. not to get into the jam while it is still having sun and breating. ...


2

The amount of sugar in this recipe looks a bit low for a 10 minute simmer. I estimate that the bulk of the ingredients consists of, ~200g sugar ~330g cranberries ~330g bell pepper That's less than 25% sugar. If this were a straight cranberry jelly, you'd need about 40% sugar content for optimal jelly strength and, I estimate, at least 35%. I think that ...


2

I found a study done in Korea in 2010 that said pectin can replace shortening in cookies and therefore, they concluded other baked goods. The ideal amount was 30% replacement saying the texture was actually better and the cookies were more moist. They don't recommend going higher than 30% as a 40% difference changed the structural integrity in a "negative" ...


1

No, you can't. Different pectins set under different conditions. Some require calcium, others require a high percentage of sugar. All have their own optimal pH range. When a recipe is optimised for one type of pectin, other types won't set properly. Normally, you cannot substitute in any direction. The linked question from Jolenealaska's comment ...


1

Tapioca Jelly is interesting stuff: A typical recipe for tapioca jelly can be made by washing 2 tablespoonfuls of tapioca, pouring a pint of water over it, and soaking for three hours. It is then placed over low heat and simmered until quite clear. If too thick, a little boiling water can be added. It can be sweetened with white sugar, flavored with ...


1

There are many variables in making jam and jelly. Pectin reacts with acid, not enough acid and the pectin won't gel. Not enough pectin and the gelling won't be enough. Too much water will make the gelling agent too dispersed. So you can cook it down to get rid of the water, however that may ruin the consistency so I'd add more pectin and acid and see how ...


1

I found the following on the internet Use only the type of pectin called for in your recipe. Powdered pectin and liquid pectin are not interchangeable in recipes. The preserving books seem to confirm that the reason liquid and powdered pectin may not be interchangeable is that the liquid version is always added after boiling but most types of powdered are ...


1

I should like to try that with Lamb Chops.


1

The pectin temperature is 104°C (220°F) (adjust -4°C per km in elevation). It can take an hour of simmering to get to this temperature To test the pectin level add one teaspoon of jam to three teaspoons of methylated spirits in a cup swirl the solution. If it forms a single clump you have enough pectin To fix low pectin levels, simmer for longer and add a ...



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