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21

Salt is perhaps the most basic and effective flavour enhancer, and so it's fairly obvious why we have it on our dinner tables. The popularity of pepper is down to the Romans, who were crazy about it. Thanks to the longevity of the Roman Empire, pepper was imported for hundreds of years, helping to establish it as the most popular spice, and keeping the ...


14

According to wikipedia, the melting point of piperine - the compound responsible for the pungency of black pepper - is 130 degrees celsius, so it's definitely not a given that anything you'll be cooking will heat all of the piperine above 130 degrees celsius - at which point you'd begin to get significantly faster decomposition (and lose the peppery flavor). ...


13

Same plant for both. Black pepper is unripe fruit (green), picked and sun dried til it turns black. White pepper is the fully ripe seed stripped of its outer husk. Here's the first link that google gave me to verify. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_pepper#White_pepper Also, Harold McGee has a couple of pages in "On Food and Cooking" for further detail. ...


9

Black pepper and white pepper are differing preparations of the fruit of the Piper nigrum plant. Black pepper is made from the unripened, green fruit. It is dried, whereupon the fruit shrivels leaving the distinctive black, wrinkly exterior. White pepper is the fruit's dried seed without the encapsulating flesh. The flesh is removed by a process called ...


8

To taste is one of those awesome cooking terms that trips people up all the time. To taste does not mean to what tastes good to you, although you can use that as a determination and your dish should still come out fine for most people. To taste means that you add salt (or whatever) while tasting the dish and you slowly add until the seasoning tastes ...


8

Executive summary Buy the shortest pepper mill you can comfortably use and only fill it with two or three weeks worth of peppercorns. The colour should be light and if you buy more than one similarly shaped mill, be sure to buy contrasting colours if they are not otherwise easily distinguishable from one another. You should not chose a transparent mill for ...


7

Have you ever eaten something so hot it made you cry and felt like it'd never stop burning? Given what you've said you've tried, this thing is probably 10-100x as hot as the kind of pepper that would do that to you. Please be careful. In any case, pretty much the sole point of a pepper like this is to try to be the hottest thing in the world. The amount of ...


6

You'll need 2 recipes: Cacio e Pepe ... just do some searches for that dish, and you'll find a bunch of recipes. Pecorino/Parmesan Cheese Shell. Try grating fresh Parmesan and sprinkling it over a silicone baking mat. While it's still warm, drape it over an upside-down bowl to shape it. Once it cools, I think you're all set. I plan to try this! EDIT: ...


5

I found an interesting article by Harold McGee, where he writes that the substance rotundone is contained in much higher concentrations in white pepper than in black, and goes on to note: ...they tested 49 people and found that about 20 percent of them could not detect rotundone at all, even at concentrations far above what’s found in white pepper. The ...


5

Briefly: "pimentón" is Spanish for "paprika". "ahumado" is Spanish for "smoked". There is non-smoked pimentón as well, so "pimentón ahumado" is just one of the varieties of pimentón. Others are "dulce" ("sweet", meaning not hot) and "picante" ("hot"). "de La Vera" means "from La Vera" which, as Ryan says, is a region in Spain where they make one of the ...


4

Cacio e Pepe is a great traditional roman dish (I'm roman!). The ingredients are: pecorino cheese, 160g for 4 people (I use Pecorino Romano, but you can use an equivalent sheep (not cow) cheese). Freshly ground black pepper olive oil (optional) Boil the pasta in salted water. In the meantime heat some olive oil in a pan. Keep in a little bowl some ...


4

From the best I can tell, "de la vera" is a regional form of spanish smoked paprika, where ahumado is the more generic form. Sort of like how real cheddar cheese only comes from Cheddar, England or or a true Burgundy wine can only come from Burgundy, France - "de la vera" comes from around the Tietar River in La Vera, Spain. Pimenton de la Vera has been ...


4

"To taste" just means to add as much as needed to make it taste good to you. There's no real right or wrong answer, unless you're cooking for other people. If you don't know what the correct amount of seasoning is for a dish, it's best to leave it on the bland side. Then everyone can season their own dishes "to taste" for themselves.


3

Your local hardware store or DIY shop will likely have an assortment of dust masks you could try. The simplest ones would be cheap and very quick to put on and remove, and should help. It seems a little over the top to have to put on a mask for using pepper, but perhaps you're extra sensitive and it's just something you'll have to deal with. Do you have ...


3

Yes white pepper has a very distinct flavour. Many people perceive it to have a "hotter" flavour, while having less complex flavours than black. If the white pepper flavour seems to dominate a specific dish, I'd simply use less. A lot of recipes call for it simply because of the colour. Personally, I think that's ridiculous as the flavour is very different. ...


2

I vote for #1 on your list. The white pepper is simply black that has been soaked and the outer skin was removed. Recipes seem to call for white pepper in light colored sauces just to keep them white. I have read that they should taste identical. Anecdotally- the couple times I have used white I have had experiences exactly like yours. I found it bitter ...


2

I guess you are using already grounded pepper. If you mill your own, I think the resulting particles are too big to fly their way to your nose! Edit Answering your comment: So I think you could prepare something like Black Pepper Oil (adapting the recipe for grounded pepper, just filtering the resulting oil with care) and suffer your sneezing much less ...


2

Unless you're straining the soup, I'd assume that the whole vs. cracked isn't going to be helpful in removing them, although I will admit that I can't recall seeing a recipe that called for whole peppercorns that didn't require cracking them. Part of the reason for whole pepercorns is the surface area -- if you crack it, you'll create more surface area, and ...


2

Heating pepper creates bitterness, particularly if ground. Though I think it depends what you're cooking with the pepper and how pepper is added, and when. Julia Child very often adds pepper near the end of a cooking cycle and that's French training - so is adding whole (unbroken) pepper corns to braises and stews. A third point is you've got to experiment ...


2

Just to be clear, you're talking about black peppercorns (Piper nigrum) not chili peppers, correct? If so, are you also allergic to pink "pepper" (Schinus molle or Schinus terebinthifolius)? If not, those would probably be your closest substitutes. Depending again on what exactly you're allergic to, piperine (the primary "hot" alkaloid in black pepper) may ...


2

Here is a snarky but historically enlightening article on the combination from Slate magazine. 1) Salt enhances flavors that already exist in the food. Here is an article discussing the science behind the phenomenon from the ScienceFare site. 2) Pepper brightens flavor, and masks off-putting notes, such as staleness or blandness from overcooking. Black ...


2

There is no "rule". You just select what looks good in your kitchen according to your tastes. I personally don't grind rock salt and use a normal shaker for that. some pepper mills have a clear (see-through) casing which makes it easy to find out what's inside. I have seen some "clear" mills with black peppercorn, pink peppercorn, and a mix (black, pink, ...


1

A technique that sometimes works for me is to skim off any oil that is on the top and discard it. Piperine (the "active ingredient" in pepper), like Capsaicin (the "active ingredient" in chillis) is oil soluble, and oil floats on water. There is generally a higher concentration of hot stuff in the oil, so removing it can sometimes reduce the heat. While this ...


1

The hottest part of the pepper is inside the actual fruit, the white veins (aka placenta) contains the highest concentration of capsaicin (the source of the 'heat'). If you carefully clean the pepper, removing the internals, even lightly scrapping the inner walls of the pepper, you will end up with a much more mild pepper. If you will go a step further and ...


1

Pepper is likely just lucky to be a very commonly used spice that gets to hang with Salt all the time, though Salt really makes everyone else look good anyway. Pepper just doesn't look good on its own. Uh... Yeah. I say you do see salt paired with plenty of other spices, but because "Salt and Pepper" is pretty engrained in our culture (refer to the ...


1

I think any type of mask/plugs that would stop the pepper dust getting in your nose would work. Perhaps a surgical mask, or a painter's dust mask would help. Swimmer's nose plugs are another option. My dad makes horseradish fresh every year for Passover, and he actually uses a full military issue gas mask to keep the fumes up. In his defence, the stuff will ...



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