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37

In Indian cooking we usually add Ghee (Clarified butter) to reduce the heat of a chili pepper. Most Indian dishes, we would add a good heaping spoon of ghee before feeding little ones. This helps temper the heat but keeps the flavors alive so that the children get used to them and can gradually learn to eat hotter foods.


13

I roast them "fresh" as I need them, but my method scales up easily. I use a gas grill and turn it to high. Set the whole peppers on the grill, and turn them when the skin is black on the hot side. When they're black all over (after maybe 2-3 minutes per side for all 4 sides of the typical ones in my local supermarket), I put them into a large ...


9

Granted, my peppers were farmed in California, not India, but they should be well within an order of magnitude of its variety's rating. Actually, they shouldn't necessarily. All chiles, are very sensitive to the environment they are grown in. Even trivial changes in temperature, humidity, and soil pH can affect the heat of the chile. The Naga Jolokia in ...


9

Unfortunately...I think that other answer gave some dangerous information. Sticking a raw pepper in oil and letting it sit out is dangerous. Not only could the moisture cause mold apparently but sticking something like that in oil runs the risk for botulism. You could reduce the risk of mold by using dried peppers, but botulism is still there.


9

In most instances I've seen, in American cookbooks, "red pepper" refers to cayenne pepper or chili powder (not the spice mix designed for making chili con carne, but dried, ground chilis). It is usually spicy rather than being red bell pepper. Edit to add: I'm talking about this type of product: McCormic Ground red pepper Source


9

Most Comercial banana peppers are indeed pickled. This is relatively easy to do yourself or you can eat them fresh. Eaten fresh their taste varies depending on the capsaicin present but the vary from a bell pepper flavor to a flavor similar to a jalapeno. The amount of capsaicin varies widely between cultivars so ask your plant/seed vendor to inform you of ...


8

What is the world's hottest pepper? According to the Scovile Scale the hottest pepper is Bhut Jolokia. The one you are currently growing Scovile Scale Visualized What is a naga jolokia, and where does it stand in comparison to the other "contender" peppers? Bhut Jolokia or Naga Jologia According to some sources, they indicate that Bhut and ...


7

According the Scoville Scale the peppers you mention (the Bhut Jolokia chili pepper) are ranked with the hottest of the peppers, albeit in a 'wide range' (855,000–1,463,700 Scoville heat units). The Scoville explanation on Wikipedia (linked above) does not include "naga jolokia" but does include "Naga Viper" and "Bhut Jolokia". It is likely that "Naga ...


7

Each variety of chile has a subtly different flavor, but generally the kind to use is determined by how spicy you want the dish to be; spicier dishes need hotter peppers, otherwise you end up with a dish dominated by the peppers. For this reason, most people sort chiles by their spiciness, measured in Scoville Heat Units (SHU). The exact same papers can be ...


7

in my culture we make so called AJVAR (and it is usable for whole winter) it is usually made in late summer when red peppers come to season (and are cheapest too). We prefer it home made rather than buying it ready. It is not all about the money :) And we do it big scale operation (whole day or weekend event). This is recipe with notes: buy "thick" pointed ...


6

We make vegetarian chili every few months, and use a combination of many kinds of beans. You can use kidney, cannelini (white kidney beans), pinto, small red, small white, roman, etc. We like Goya's beans. If the meat is tough, you may want mushier beans to add textural difference, so you might want to avoid black beans or black-eyed peas. (Unless they're ...


6

This site talks about this a bit. It says that ~60% of the capsaicin heat is in the pith and ~40% is in the seeds and other parts of the flesh. It suggests removing and discarding the pith and seeds to reduce the heat. It also suggests soaking the peppers in vinegar for a day. I guess depending on what you're cooking this may or may not work. Also, since ...


6

I have found that roasting peppers and removing their skins can do a great deal to reduce the heat. I have a garden full of jalapeños and I roast many of them before putting them in salsas or eating them plane. The roasting does change the flavor, but I find that it mellows it out, while not eliminating it. It is your choice to keep the seeds or not, they ...


6

One habanero per six quarts of chili, containing approximately one quart meat, provides a solid heat that an average palate can handle. I have cooked chili on numerous occasions for groups of people and found this formula works for most people. Typically I stack it with other, lower-Scoville peppers to produce a well-bodied heat. Other things to bear in ...


6

From my limited (but successful) experience, here are some answers to your subjective questions: Choose peppers whose flavor you do want Avoid peppers whose flavor you do not like (I'd never infuse green bell pepper, blech!) Choose a vodka you'd want to drink (if you like cheap vodka, use it, if you like expensive vodka, use that) As far as the mechanics ...


6

Put a flame to the peppers (either on the gas stove or a blowtorch). When it's black, it peels great. The meat will not be cooked. Another way is to put it in the oven until done. When warm they peel great, but of course the meat will be done. Edit: the method described here will be better, still.


5

It depends how long you will need to store them. A couple days in the fridge won't effect them much. After three or four days they will start to go limp. In my experience, limp, un-fresh veggies make terrible pickles. I wouldn't freeze them. In general freezing will keep them good for a long time but they will still be a little limp when they are thawed ...


5

Let me just clarify why some places will say the Bhut is the hottest and some will say the Viper is the hottest. It's because there are two different notions of "hottest". One notion is this: If I were to grow some peppers, what variety would get me the hottest peppers on average? The answer to this is the Bhut. They consistently produce peppers over ...


5

The term "ground red pepper" is ambiguous in English. Things sold under that name in the US have a wide range of heats, and likely are made from multiple varieties of peppers, though I'd say they're more commonly hot things like cayenne, or other varieties with somewhat less heat. That said, don't worry about it too much in these cases. Anything from mild ...


5

I have used this method with Scotch Bonnets and Habaneros. Jalapenos are tame in comparison. All bets are off with Ghost Peppers. Those are weapons grade.: Before dealing with the pepper, rub oil (olive is fine) on your fingers making sure you get it embedded around your finger nails. Besides that, the simple ways you can minimize burn: Avoid ...


4

The sugar is mostly just for flavor. I use sugar when making pickled beets and eggs, but don't use it in my dill pickles or pickled peppers and onions. It just depends on if you are trying for a sour, sweet and sour, or sweet pickle (note that there is no vinegar in many fruit pickles). Before you decide to run off and leave out the vinegar, however, I ...


4

My secret ingredient is Lee & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce. I don't blanch peppers, and stuff them with a pre-cooked mixture of hamburger, rice, and canned tomatoes. Blanching takes effort, may leech valued vitamins, and I don't mind baking for longer. The hamburger gets browned, drained, then simmered for a while with onions, worcestershire sauce, and ...


4

Although this may be a different solution to the question, you might just try some of the more flavorful mild peppers in combination with the hotter choices in the recipes you prepare. A sweet paprika pepper is wonderfully flavorful. A minimal amount of habanero in a recipe would still impart its flavor. Roasting the peppers may also intensify the flavor ...


4

Meat, as long as it's fresh, can be frozen without fanfare. Vegetables are another story. Usually they need to be blanched and cooled before freezing (to stop enzymes from causing them to mature past their prime). However, peppers and onions are fine to freeze "as is". I am concerned, though, that you won't like the vegetable quality once they are ...


4

You need a small wire grid to put on the bottom of your tagine. You can make one by cutting up an old cake cooling rack Also consider baking for 3/4 of the time and then switching the oven to grill with the tagine lid off for the remaining 1/4 time (or thereabouts) . This should still keep them moist, but just lightly crisp the pepper tops without burning ...


4

The heat is the same; all peppers contain capsaicin. The Scoville scale defines heat in terms of capsaicin content. Use the peppers that have the flavor you want, and make it as hot as you want, and you'll be set. And the flavor besides heat is definitely concentrated in the flesh, so you shouldn't notice any real difference in pepper flavor either.


4

I have found that the problem with thicker batters not adhering to peppers generally is to do with the outer membrane protecting the flesh of the jalapeno. Essentially, you need to try to remove or weaken its effect. You can minimize the effect of the membrane by: roasting the pepper, then steam in a brown paper bag and remove it scoring the membrane ...


4

Once you roast your own you will never go back! Mine keep for around 1 month in the fridge. That is not conclusive however! Cost depends on season (when peppers are cheap, it is worth it. When they are out of season, maybe not), and the quality of the olive oil you use. Method - slice them into large, fairly flat pieces - about 4 per pepper. Lay ...


3

I am not sure if you are confusing roasting with charring but both are the same basically, though roasting the pepper by charring the skin would be a more accurate nomenclature. Roasting brings smokiness to the pepper and softens its bite. It allows you to remove skin more easily. When you char the outside of dried peppers in a dry skillet with spices, then ...


3

The sauce itself will stay not much above 212 F, but locally at the bottom, it can get much higher and scorch, and that will be especially true under the peppers. One option would be to cook the peppers and filling separately, then stuff the peppers and simmer them only briefly with the sauce. You could also try oiling the pot, that may help some.



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