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9

Those are the flavorings. Just like dill pickles have dill in them, those are what give the flavor profile that people expect from bread & butter pickles.


8

Don't check on it. When I lived in Virginia I used to drive up to Pennsylvania every year to this little Amish farm to buy a gallon of the best sauerkraut I've ever tasted. They showed you how they made it, and I remember the farmer stressing two things: (1) sterilize the jars, (2) don't touch it for 2 months.


8

"Pickling salt" is sold, the main difference being the absence of iodine and anti-caking agents. The anti-caking agents can cloud the pickling liquid, but shouldn't effect the flavor. Iodine can impart a bit of a bitter aftertaste, and some sources say can "react adversely with some foods". I've never noticed a difference between the taste of table salt and ...


8

I've never heard of it being done and I can't imagine why you'd want to try. An avocado is 70-80% water and 15% fat. That means you would basically be making pickled fat. Compare to cucumbers and peppers which are both in the range of 0.1 to 0.2% fat, and much firmer than even an unripe avocado when raw. I'm sure that it would be safe as long as it's done ...


7

Traditional fermented pickles were kept in barrels, but they're not the kind that you buy in a big jar at Costco. Those pickles have been briefly cooked in a brine, and should be refrigerated after you open the jar. The salt and vinegar should keep them safe for a while, but they will likely go bad at room temperature before you finish eating the whole jar. ...


7

While reusing brine is probably fine in many cases, it's tricky from a food-safety perspective. It seems like there are lots of threads on the internet these days about reusing "pickle juice," and there are great reasons to take your brine and use it in some recipe for salads, dressings, sauces, etc. that you'll consume soon after making (or at least ...


7

This is completely normal and expected. Indian pickle is fermented. One of the by products of that fermentation is gas. The salt keeps undesirable bacteria from growing. In the future you should use a container that can be less tightly closed and allow some of the gas to vent as it ferments. You wouldn't want a bottle to burst.


6

Pickling salt is very fine-grained, so that it will dissolve easily. It is important to have an even salt solution when pickling. You can use a more coarse salt; just take care it's dissolved completely. Iodized salt can also turn the pickled items a darker color.


6

I'm including links to specific recipes here, but not all of these recipes give fermenting instructions. I'm sure you could do these fermented though - as opposed to using whatever other pickling method is given. Pickled watermelon rinds are fun - spiced w/ clove, ginger, lemon, and cinnamon. Blueberries can be pickled - try with allspice, cinnamon, and ...


6

Short answer is "yes". Sour pickles don't get sour because of yeast. Pickles get sour due to lactic acid produced by bacteria, the same way kimchi works. Propably you could even add a bit of real home-made yoghurt to boost the bacteria. The bacteria needed are already present on the cucumbers (even after you wash them, but you shouldn't srcub them too ...


6

Evidently, despite your not doing so intentionally, the evidently the brine was in fact hot enough to heat the air in the head space enough that when it cooled, a partial vacuum was created. The jars are truly sealed as you noted from your description. While they are sealed, since you did not process the pickles, they are not certain to be safe for long ...


6

Keep it in the fridge and eat it soon. There is a chance that you contaminated the product when you opened the jar and took out a slice. It is no longer sterile.


5

It depends how long you will need to store them. A couple days in the fridge won't effect them much. After three or four days they will start to go limp. In my experience, limp, un-fresh veggies make terrible pickles. I wouldn't freeze them. In general freezing will keep them good for a long time but they will still be a little limp when they are thawed ...


5

ANY amount of water on the jar or the ingredients does result in the formation of whitish fungus at the affected spot. This will later turn black and the pickle will sour giving off a fermented smell. The only exception is if that spot is well immersed in oil- but no guarantee it is off! The "water" in the fruit, being juice, fights formation of fungus and ...


5

Seems this is very common in Britain, where I come from, so google.co.uk did the business! The recipe here allows storing in a cool, dark cupboard for up to six months, and it recommends leaving the eggs at least a month: http://www.accidentalsmallholder.net/food/recipes/pickled-eggs Here's another with more interesting spicing: ...


5

Pickle recipes meant for longer-term storage will include instructions for sealing the jars. While some recipes may have you use hot jars and hot brine that will result in a fairly reliable seal ratio (meaning most of the jars will properly seal), other recipes will have you put the filled and closed jars in a boiling water bath to be processed for a ...


5

I have had some success with this recipe: http://awesomepickle.com/pickled-herring-recipe-how-to-fillet-a-fish/ The fish should keep for a couple of weeks once pickled, but I always tend to eat mine in the first few days.


5

I have seen recipes that call for chopped white onions instead of pearl onions, which leads me to believe it is feasible. The texture might be different; when cooked, pearl onions tend to have a different sort of bite to them, much like a grape, revealing a burst of flavor after a slight resistance, whereas chopped fullsize onions tend to be more one-note ...


5

Those pickles create their own acid. Wild bacteria that can handle the very high salt content produce lactic acid, thus preserving the pickles. Botulism won't grow in that much salt and with how acidic the pickles are going to be when they're done. That's kind of the point of pickling in the first place. The instructions say to leave the lid loose because ...


4

The non refrigerated life of things like pickles can be greatly enhanced by careful access to the barrel In a closed room with still air open the barrel and using a very clean ladle decant enough to fill your normal sized jar and then close the barrel firmly and store in cool dark place As long as the main storage barrel is only open a few times in clean ...


4

Since you didn't heat the glass after adding the newly chopped radishes, any bacteria on the radishes weren't killed. The solution (sour and salty) should reduce growth of bacteria, but in this case this wasn't enough. Next time remember to heat the picles according to standard pickling instructions.


4

Rinsing the sauerkraut absolutely does work - we do it all the time, both with store-bought and homemade sauerkraut. Every batch of sauerkraut is different, so rinsing & tasting is the only way to ensure that your dishes turn out appropriately salted. Yes, some of the salt has entered the cabbage itself, but most of it will be in the brine/on the ...


4

Adding the missing cabbage is a viable solution. You could also just remove some of the brine and replace it with water, until it's salty to your taste. Finally, you could just rinse some of the brine off of it before eating it.


4

The sugar is mostly just for flavor. I use sugar when making pickled beets and eggs, but don't use it in my dill pickles or pickled peppers and onions. It just depends on if you are trying for a sour, sweet and sour, or sweet pickle (note that there is no vinegar in many fruit pickles). Before you decide to run off and leave out the vinegar, however, I ...


4

The recipe appears to be close to a standard Summer Pickle recipe. It's about a 9% brine with 3.75% acetic acid, which should effectively discourage human pathogens. It is not a fermented product. They're meant to be refrigerated for at most a few months, not stored on some dusty basement shelf. Refrigerated properly, I'd eat them without concern.


4

I have done some experiments pickling eggs with left over cucumber pickle brine. Just to be safe I reboiled the brine to sterilize it. It tasted great. I don't do this with my eggs anymore simply because pickled eggs have more potential than cucumbers. I pickle my eggs now with different vinegars, like balsamic, for more interesting flavors and colors.


4

Yes being from England I have always stored my pickled eggs in a dark cupboard for at least a month (if they last that long from sticky fingers...) and ONLY after opening do I put them in the fridge. We also use Malt Vinegar to pickle them and yes you can get malt vinegar over here as my friend brought me some from Wisconsin and walmart now sell it.


4

REDACTED. Botulism growth is inhibited at pH of 4.6 or lower. The pH of this recipe is lower than 4.6 because of the vinegars. http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09305.html After re-reading the recipe, I think the OP is right. This is not the safest recipe out there. For a great pickling recipe that is safe, try this: ...


4

No, this is nonsense. Bacteria are everywhere, crawling over all of your food. This is why food spoils - quickly outside of the fridge, within a few days in the fridge. Touching food with your fingers should not introduce any new bacteria species, except in some extreme cases (e.g. if you have been handling soil and not washed them well, or if you have a ...


4

The short answer is 1-2 years for traditional pickles, assuming a good recipe with adequate salt content and fermentation time (traditionally anywhere from a month to a few months). For modern quick fermented homemade recipes, where the pickles are fermented in a week or so instead of months, I'd recommend using them up within a month or two. Some ...



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