Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Alton Brown and an Elvis impersonator called it a custard pie.


14

There used to be a good reason to add the jelly to the meat pie: food safety. In the time before refrigerators, it was hard to keep meat without some spoilage. But a slaughtered fully grown pig meant some hundred kilos of meat, and it wasn't eaten on a single day. Most of the bacteria which spoil meat need oxygen to proliferate. So once you pack the meat ...


12

Depends on the apple. Apples with softer skins will bake to a more even consistancy, but apples with tough skin (the 'shiny' kinds like mackintosh or red delicious) tend to get caught in your teeth and throat, and are generally a pain to eat. If you do make a pie with the skins on, use smaller pieces of apple or slice around the apples to create shorter ...


12

Label them before you put them away. Use pictures of the filling in pastry on the top crust. X-Ray machine?


12

If you do this often I would make a little pastry cut out of the fruit type of the pie and use some egg wash to stick it onto the pie - it looks good and eases identification.


12

I can see this as being similar to a sweet potato pie. Best bet in that case would be to cook the carrots, then puree and mix with eggs, milk, etc. just as if it were a sweet potato or pumpkin pie. Two alternatives that come to mind would be to treat it like a fruit pie, as you say. Because of the texture of the carrots, I would grate them with the large ...


11

McDonald's' et al pies are essentially fried pies, a feature of Southern US cooking, adapted for cooking in fast food facilities. A Google search for 'fried apple pie recipes' turns up plenty of results. Try this: http://southernfood.about.com/od/apples/r/bl90416c.htm


11

It definitely needs to cool to prevent burns - the filling is likely even above the boiling point of water, because it has so much sugar in it and has been in a hot oven. Eating it pleasantly warm is one thing, but it takes a long time to cool from over 100C/212F down to a nice warm/hot temperature somewhere around 50C/120F. (It's not like a cookie, which ...


10

In my opinion, cakes rise, pies have crusts that are filled (and do not rise). By those loose definitions, I would consider it a pie. edit: Wikipedia says it's neither. Many types of cheesecake are essentially custards, which can lead a novice baker to overcook them, expecting them to behave like true cakes.


10

You have several options for the crust. It is possible to purchase mixes that will get you started. There are also several recipes available. A good resource for all your gluten-free baking is Gluten-Free Girl and the Chef, and you can find a recipe there. Another great option is former pastry chef Helene at Tartlette. This question has compiled a list ...


9

When making fruit pies your goal is essentially to make a loose jam inside the crust, something that will remain firm and cohesive without resisting fork or tooth. Apple skins are detrimental to this process as they aren't hygroscopic and will prevent the apple pieces from melding with the other pieces on the skinned side. I'm not saying it's impossible to ...


9

You may use all sorts of pumpkins and squashes (a Cucurbita moschata or Cucurbita pepo may be called either, depending on variety) to make a pie. The Halloween types may not be the best choice: they tend to be stringy, not very sweet, and sometimes over treated with pesticides. Instead look for the small varieties (around 5 lbs.) called Sugar, Long Pie, or ...


9

I think some grated ginger root would add a wonderful touch to your pie. The fresh notes in ginger will cut through the syrupy sweetness of the apples and carrots like magic and ginger will also spike up the deep flavors of cinnamon and nutmeg.


9

Pie and tart are regional (North American versus Western European) terms for essentially the same thing. Some will argue that the pans make the difference (see below), but I don't buy that story. There are some stylistic differences that appear quite often, but nothing that makes them truly different things: Pies tend to be deeper, and have more filling ...


8

From this site I found that there are two major benefits to using a pie bird Prevent the pie from boiling over in the oven by allowing the steam created when the fruit filling or other contents are cooking to escape from inside the pie Support the pastry crust in the center of the pie, so that it did not sag in the middle Based on the ...


8

When preparing regular pie pastry, first chill the standard 30 minutes in the refrigerator before freezing. Chilling of pie pastry does two things: Relaxes the gluten that has developed during mixing Hydrates the starch granules (the more moisture the starch granules absorb, the more tender the final result) Placing pie pastry right into the freezer ...


8

Yes. Presumably you're doing the firming up during the cooking, and not afterwards? Drain off liquid / condense any liquid. Heat fruit before placing in pie to drive off moisture Use a touch of cream Use binder / starch Use gelatin in the fruit mixture tapioca (credit to justkt for this one)


8

I've only seen that color in canned cream of chicken soup and I'm dubious of its source. I personally don't feel like it has to be yellow. If your goal is just color I would use turmeric- it is my yellow-stain of choice.


8

I went to the farmers' market last week and bought a variety of apples. After cooking, here's the order from softest to firmest: McIntosh, Cortland, Winesap, Yellow Delicious. The McIntosh of course practically dissolve. If you want to make quick apple sauce, or if you like really squishy pie, they're the best. I typically prefer Cortlands for pie, b/c ...


8

What you have there is simply water seeping out of the gel and bringing some dissolved stuff with it. This is known technically as syneresis. What will help is to add something stabilize the gel. Xanthan gum is probably the easiest thing to use. You can find it at health food stores or Whole Foods because gluten-free bakers use it a lot. Start with 1/8 ...


8

You may already know that pastry making requires everything to be cold - the fat, the water, your hands, the board, everything. This is to prevent the fat from melting into the flour prematurely, which results in cardboard-like pastry. When the fat remains cool until cooking, it melts into layers in the pastry as it cooks, making it nice and flaky. If you ...


8

With great skill, a true artist could do what you describe with Thai/Vietnamese rice paper, the dinner plate sized, extra thin ones, like for Fresh Spring Rolls. I will never apply for the job, I promise.


8

I respect Jolenealaska's creative thought, but nothing truly resembling pastry is going to be translucent or transparent unless it is exceedingly thin. The structure alone will refract light, making the product opaque in the same way snow is opaque even though individual water crystals are fairly transparent, if they don't have air inclusions. This is ...


8

For apple, specifically, I tend to add a very thin layer of quick oats to the bottom of the pie filler to soak up any excess moisture. But nothing else really stands out in my recipe if I were to freeze it. My big thing is to use something that can handle the temperature change from freezer to oven (such as pyrex), and help it by giving it a smooth ...


7

You should peel your apples. If you don't it gets hard and rough and isn't pleasant. The nutritional value is pretty much lost because it gets cooked. Just eat the peel you've got left :)


7

Whether using rice or beans (I've used both) you first want to line the pastry dough with parchment paper or foil and then place the beans or rice on top. You can re-use either over and over. I have dried beans that I've been using for more than a decade. Just let them cool completely before placing into a coffee can or other such storage container. If ...


7

I have cooked rice that was used for weighting a pie crust with fine results. I should have cooked some that wasn't baked to see what the difference was, but in any case it turned out fine. Of course it may matter what temp the rice was baked at and for how long, and this could also affect the duration needed to cook the rice itself. I have also boiled ...


7

What do you mean by hold up well? Structurally? Carrots and peas are rather common in a traditional chicken pot pie. Cauliflower is probably way too delicate to hold up well, also it's too mildly flavored to serve as a primary flavor. I would suggest trying some heartier root vegetables or starches. Potatoes, squash, zucchini are some good possibilities. ...


7

If you'd like to make something with cauliflower and/or broccoli, try this: trim and wash the florets (keep the stems for something else if you like). Blanch them in boiling salted water for 3 or 4 minutes (a little longer maybe for cauliflower). Drain them and dump them into some cold water, then drain them. Now (or before now): get a heavy roasting pan ...


7

Yes, it is mainly tradition, appearance, and how you like the ratio of crust to fruit in your pie. You can make any pie open faced, with a full top, or any type of lattice top. The other thing to consider is that a top crust provides some heat insulation to the fruit, so if you don't want the fruit to caramelize as much, it will help with that.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible