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4

Cobbler is a funny creature. In general, even in the South, many cobblers only have a single, top, crust and it is usually not a pie-style crust. It is usually more biscuit like: From here They may also have a single top pie crust, either solid or latticed and some of them do have a double crust, though it doesn't usually come up the sides of the pan. ...


0

If a firm, finely textured, somewhat cookie-ish texture is acceptable (compare hand-sized, storebought mince pies), try hot water shortcrust. Just do not overbake it or make it too thick, it can turn hard as hardtack that way.


3

As others have mentioned, for savory pastries, there are various types of crusts that are meant to be held in the hand, and are thus not likely to be either flaky or crumbly. Examples are pasties, calzones, or even pizza. For sweet pastries, you could look into the sort of pastry used for, e.g. Hungarian-style apple pie (almás lepény). Granted, this isn't ...


2

The non-flaky, non-crumbly crust is hot water pastry. This king of pastry is used extensively in Scotland both for savoury pies like Scotch (mutton) pies or for sweet pies like rhubarb. It is a lard-based crust. You should be able to get a recipe by searching for "scotch pie recipe"


1

I don't know if there's a particular name for the crust, but most hand pies would have something closer to what you're looking for. They have to be a bit more elastic, as they need to hold up to being stretched over the pie without the support of a pie pan. You can find things by searching for 'hand pie crust' or 'pocket pie crust' on the internet, as ...


0

I make my pie crust by following my basic biscuit recipe minus any baking soda or powder. It makes a beautiful flaky crust. I can't tell from your question if that's what you are looking for or looking to avoid, but that's what I do.


4

Normally, pies are done with pie crusts, and they do have the crust types you describe. But you can certainly add pie filling to some other type of crust and enjoy the result, if that's what you prefer. Typical doughs used for crusts would be: millefeuille dough is the most common variant, sometimes also seen as direct substitution for people who don't ...


4

What you are looking for is typically considered a kitchen mistake: Overkneading. Not-so gentle handling of the dough and some kneading plus a bit more eggs or a dash of milk will add density. There is actually one special use case where bakers go for that more elastic and less crumbly dough: Cornish Pasties Straight from the Cornish Pasty Association, ...


3

There are two approaches you could use on this, which are to either make a stew with all the ingredients and then turn it into a pie, or prepare separately and then put together into a pie. Which to choose depends on your personal preference. Using the stew method blends all the flavors together and is less work and cleanup as you don't have to cook the ...



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