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2

The secret to microwave pizzas isn't the ingredients (although that might be part of it) ... the real trick is that they have you cook the pizza on top of the box. The box has a special 'crisping disk' in it which is susceptible to microwaves ... it absorbs microwaves, heats up and then either conducts or radiates heat to the food to be cooked. You can buy ...


1

I have made many pizzas without yeast because it was not available? plain flour, 2 table-spoons of margarine, pinch of salt, 1 cup of milk. 1-preheat the oven first, in bowl put 2 cups of plain flour, add butter. use your hand to mix. 2-add salt and cup of milk and mix with hands. the mixture is sticky now. (If you want you can add teaspoon of herbs or ...


0

Oils can often be emitted from the cheese, pepperoni, meats, etc. Basically anything that is animal-based can have oils that seep out at high temperatures. Better pizza establishments will tend to use higher-quality (or at least more predictable) ingredients to manage the oiliness of their products.


5

I have had a pizza with a drizzle of olive oil on top (in addition to some basil, pesto, and something else). As best I remember, it did not end up looking, feeling, or tasting particularly "oily", although it was visually apparent (olive-green lines). However, that was a high-end pizzeria; I've never seen oil on a delivered pizza, at least not any that was ...


1

The ingredients (milk) don't matter. You are not storing milk, you are storing dough. So it behaves like dough, not like milk. Dough is full of yeast (obviously). It fills the ecological niche which would be taken up by pathogenic bacteria in other foods. So, no bacteria can take residence there, regardless of the presence of milk. Treat it like any other ...


-1

~~ The molecules (arrangement of atoms) which comprise pizza dough are polymeric in affinity. You've probably heard of polymer chains, usually in association with petrochemicals. But foods too can possess this property. Polymers invariably are long structures because their individual molecules like to come together in relatively straight lines, sort of ...


0

~~ Using three pizza stones of the same size works. But they really do need to be of the same size. One goes into the oven. The other two are used to set up the transfer. The general methodology is as follows. It is assumed that the fresh dough is prepared but has not been removed from its work surface. It is also assumed that the first pizza stone is ...


1

I think there's lots of things at play in your situation. Bread has many variables ("degrees of freedom"), and this is part of the reason that bread is so fun and so diverse (and so fun)! Experimentation is warranted here, I think. There's many sourdough enthusiasts around here, so you'll probably get many different opinions. Take the suggestions you like ...


3

Yeast action is only one factor in getting a rise when baking. Yeast metabolizes sugars and produces CO2 bubbles which puff up your dough, and also help with gluten development to make your dough stretchy. However, when you bake your dough much of the lift you get is from the expansion of water turning into steam - this is what makes pizza dough puff up a ...


0

The alcohol was not a problem in my case. I want to clarify that my sourdough was not producing any liquid in any visible quantity, the alcoholic smell started to fade as soon as I leaved the container opened for a about a day . I have also used the very same sourdough, without refreshing it in the meantime, for my latest baked goods and it's active and ...


1

Most likely, the yeast in your starter are getting tired and/or hungry. A starter will start developing a strong alcohol smell and start "leaking" a dark fluid once the yeast start running out of food. This happens to me if I neglect my starter for over 2 weeks or so. I would recommend keeping your starter in the refrigerator, not at room temperature. You ...


2

If you've truly gone anaerobic and the smell is off, you are growing things other than the intended cultures... As a rule, I simply feed mine flour and water. No sugar. The cultures can get along fine with the flour. (I did read in a reputable baking book about adding leftover water from boiling potatoes, for the starches, but I haven't had a chance to ...


1

In addition to using floor tiles (I have tiles of about 0.75 cm thick, which isn't enough), I cook my pizzas in two cycles in an electric oven that has a grill function. I put the oven at the highest temperature with the grill function on. Then I place the shelf with the floor tiles as close to the grill/heating elements as possible. I let that heat up ...



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