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-1

Get toaster oven heated to 425F. Then roll dough (after rise), then cut carefully with sharp knife (to fit pan size). Coat toaster oven pan lightly with oil. Fit dough in pan. Put in toaster oven. Look through glass occasionally for browning on top, then when browning just starts, take out and turn over. Put back in for a few minutes then take out again. If ...


2

Here in Italy it is normal to buy in the stores cold pizza for eating as snack. Pizza is similar to bread so it should be safe if conserved properly.


7

Not really. Assuming that the pizza has been cooled down and stored properly (for which see here and here) then it most likely won't have developed a potentially harmful microbial load. Additionally, while reheating might kill off most of the microbes in the food (assuming that you reached and maintained a temperature sufficient for pasteurization, which ...


4

The test of a truly great pizza is how it tastes the next day — cold, right out of the refrigerator. Provided the freshly cooked pizza was not left out at room temperature for an extended period of time; and it's been refrigerated for only a day or so; it ought to be safe to eat. It's a different experience eating cold pizza, but if it was made with the ...


0

Assemble the pizza on a cornmeal-dusted pizza peel (large flat handled tray). You need enough cornmeal to ensure that the pizza can slide off the peel and onto the stone. If the pizza slides freely on the peel, I have found it does not stick to a pizza stone/steel. If the pizza sticks to the peel, it can be a mess trying to transfer to the stone. You may ...


3

I'd use parchment paper. Foil might work, but it's not actually that great a nonstick baking material. Parchment paper is pretty much designed for that, though. The purpose of the stone is to hold a lot of heat. Parchment doesn't "void" that purpose at all. I've baked plenty of pizza and bread on a stone with parchment, and it works great. There's no need ...


2

How about just making sure it's very well floured on the bottom? I use a very ample dusting of cornmeal on my stone, and really only the cornmeal that touches the dough actually sticks to the dough -- the rest stays on the stone, and I brush it into the trash after the oven has cooled.


0

From a historical perspective, calzone were imported from Europe (like normal pizzas) while stromboli are an American invention. In Europe, following the Italian tradition, calzone are basically folded pizzas. They are made with the same dough, are baked in the same ovens, and can have the same toppings, although it is far more common in Italy to see eggs ...



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