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1

From the phrasing of your question, it sounds like you want to put the pizza directly on the grate of your grill (without a pizza stone). If that's true, then I think the secret to using a thin crust is how you handle it as you transfer it to the grate. To have your thin crust survive, build it on a flat board (e.g. a wooden cutting board) with enough ...


3

I always let pizza dough rounds rise on a flat surface. A few options: Use plastic wrap or a large bowl covered by towel or plastic, as others have said. The dough can still stick to plastic wrap, but at least you're not cleaning it off a towel. Invert a bowl over the dough that has a slightly larger diameter than the estimated final diameter of the ...


1

I mostly agree with Elendil's answer: most kinds of pizza dough can be made thinner simply by stretching the dough more (and pausing to rest for a minute or two if it starts to spring back). Wetter doughs will generally stretch more easily with less "spring back," but they can also rip more easily. Which you prefer is kind of up to you. I would add three ...


2

The secret to getting a thin crust is... use less dough. It's that simple. Pizza dough is flour, water, salt, yeast: there is no magic ingredient that will make it thinner. Simply use less dough per pizza. You may find that when you first shape the dough it will try and spring back. In this case, just cover it and leave it for 5 minutes for the gluten to ...


0

The easiest thing you can do, like already mentioned in a comment by goldilocks, is simply use a larger bowl. It will let the dough rise as much as it wants to. It won't require you to alter your dough in any way.


0

Use a linen towel, a cotton towel that has no nap, not a terry cloth or velour finished cotton towel.


5

Spray the dough with oil, dust with a little flour, and either cover loosely with plastic wrap, or if the dough is on a tray, slide the whole thing into a food safe plastic bag.


0

I found that a short burst in the microwave heats up up the whole piece. Then, you have to immediately put it into a very hot oven to get it crispy on the outside. (You said "the best way", not the most energy efficient.)


2

Since I prefer thin crust pizzas, oven re-heating often results in something resembling a burnt cracker with some half-cold toppings on it. To avoid this, I "fry" leftover pizza to reheat it: I place a tiny bit of oil or butter into the bottom of a non-stick skillet, add slices of pizza, cover, and place over very low heat until the cheese is re-melted. ...


0

Pizza is usually made with a higher protein flour than all purpose flour. Semolina flour is typically used in Italy.



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