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3

It actually sounds like your dough is good, your description is just what I'd look for in a dough. It may be your technique which is the trouble. It's takes practice to hand stretch dough right, you could try using a rolling pin instead. You should be able to stretch your dough very thin and still have it hold together. If your dough is breaking easily ...


1

Or you could try saute em before hand then just drop em on few minutes before your pizza is done?


1

You could, of course, actively dry them, in a food dehydrator or one of the many improvised versions of the same thing. You don't need to completely dehydrate them (unless, as @mrog does, you find that you like that) though if you do you can skip refrigeration. I often partially dry apples when making apple pie to get the "pie juice" thicker without ...


3

One technique for removing water from a vegetable, which works very well for onions, is to salt them liberally. Then give them some time to sit, preferably in a shallow layer. The salt will extract water from the vegetable, due to the osmotic gradient between the salt outside and the vegetable inside. Some of the salt will go into the vegetable, but much ...


0

My experience comes from native new Yorker! Calzones are served with tomato sauce, pepperoni, Italian sausage sliced, mushrooms, onions & mozzarella all inside a pizza dough!


2

It isn't a perfect match for the flavor and texture of regular pizza cheese, but soy cheese (Daiya mozzarella shreds, specifically) reheats beautifully and is even good cold. We switched cheeses because of a dairy intolerance, but found the storage properties to be a great side benefit. It does end up being a noticeable change to a pizza's flavor profile, ...


0

You might be able to, give the capacity you state in your comment, but it might not mix or rise properly. You'll have to test, keeping within the capacity limits to protect the machine. You might end up with bad dough, but it may be receoverable with some extra kneading and proving (though it won't recover to as good as you'd have got in the first ...


2

I've found that lower fat cheeses tend not to reheat particularly well. Full-fat mozzarella would be better than part skim. Also, keeping the cheese in bigger chunks gives better results than shredding, so slicing may be a better way to go. I use full-fat soft mozzarella which I pull apart or slice rather than shredding, and it has a much better texture when ...


2

While there are many cheeses to choose from, I find that provolone both heats and reheats well. Also, the flavor profile works nicely with most Italian dishes, pizza included. I've used smoked, unsmoked, mild, and sharp. Whether smoked or not, the mild tends to be a little "meltier", and more suited to the flavor I'm looking for.


7

The easiest solution is to use different cheeses. Most commercial pizzerias, like Domino's or Pizza Hut do not use expensive cheeses like Parmesean or fresh mozzerella... they use crappy cheese designed to be stretchy and to stay that way when warm instead of hot. In general, they use part-skim mozzarella, which is often sold pre-shredded and in hard blocks ...


1

I recommend putting your pizzas in a place where they stay warm. An isolated box, or in your bed in a carton box. The dough will get soggy eventually, though. Domino's gets away with this because the dough is thicker so it takes a while. If you want crispy, nice, fresh pizza, I recommend eating them fresh, especially because you are making them fresh ...


0

8 tbsp cheddar cheese powder, white or orange 1 tbsp of onion powder 1 tbsp of garlic powder 1 heaping tbsp of Italian seasoning Experiment by add 1 tbsp to your pizza dough flour mixture


2

The lack of vent holes would have been a problem. Vent holes allow steam to escape, reducing the amount of internal moisture. This moisture will both prevent the crust from cooking fully through, and will cause the crust to soften as after it comes out of the oven. That's not to say that there wasn't also some other problem, just this is one thing that ...


0

I've read many comments and have never seen so many people mix it up. STROMBOLI - pizza dough folded over in half filled with mozzarella, sausage, pepperoni, onions, peppers, and mushrooms. Sauce is served on the side. CALZONE - small personal size pizza dough folded over in have filled with ricotta, ham, capicolla and sauce. This is how they are made in ...



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