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GdD's information and suggestions are all informative and helpful. You might also try adding an 'autolyse' rest as the French do. After mixing the water, yeast, and flour together until well combined, allow the dough to rest for about 20 minutes. This allows the flour to become hydrated and the gluten to start its development. Since the gluten begins to ...


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Yes, you can absolutely cook a frozen mini pizza in the microwave. I put mine on a plate and microwaved it for about 3.5 minutes on high. It has a soft crust and it's a little gooey in the middle, but it's cooked and totally edible.


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If you make the pizza on a stainless pizza circle with a lip, just use butter, unfold the wrapper and coat the pan- then lay and form the dough to the pan. Once the za is ready to rock toss it in the oven. Wait about 7- 10 min then grab the pizza circle with a glove or cloth shake left and right to make sure it has baked enough and loose then slide it off ...


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You're all wrong in fact. The microwave heats water particles. The exact reason you can cover a heating meal with a paper towel without it igniting. The glass of water is meant to alleviate the intensity of microwaves heating the pizza and crust, thus avoiding an overcooked, chewy crust. No myth needing to be busted.. Best way to solve it all, stop ordering ...


3

No, there is no substitute for gluten, at all. The gluten + soft flour combination is itself a substitute for bread flour, so if you can get bread flour, as Catija suggested, use it. If you can't, you need another recipe. Especially if your goal is to "not make it complicated", don't use substitutes. Substitutes are always complicated. The easy thing is to ...


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If you want the dough to be strong and stretchable before baking it: What works best for me is to use a high-gluten flour (such as bread flour, and sometimes I even add more gluten) and to knead the heck out of the dough. That builds a very solid gluten structure that can pass the windowpane test. If you want the final, baked crust to be softer or ...


0

If you're happy with the flavour and texture except for the sliding, it could mostly be a question of Physics -- that is, the shape of the pizza tends to allow it to droop, and therefore the toppings can fall off. If you hold the pizza appropriately, this should be reduced to some extent. This is a great video about the math behind this idea: ...


2

Like JasonTrue, I add tomato slices at the very end, but generally I broil the tomatoes for the last two minutes in order to zap out moisture quickly. This also works for premade pizzas ordered in.


3

If I want to top a pizza with tomatoes, I generally only add them in the last two minutes of baking. The texture retains some character and they get warm to hot in that amount of time. Basically I just take the pizza out a minute or two before I expect the pizza to be fully cooked, top the pizza with sliced or chopped tomatoes, and stick it back in briefly. ...


2

Your best bet is to oven dry your tomatoes a bit. This will remove some of the moisture which will mean no puddles on your pizza and more intense tomato flavor. Slice your tomatoes as you would like them, then put them on a baking sheet. Bake them on the lowest possible temperature, opening the oven door every 10 minutes to let the moisture out. How long to ...



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