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I think the increased humidity in the microwave would help. When baking bread, adding some steam to the oven (via steam-injected or adding some water to a hot pan beneath the bread), helps get a nice crust on the bread. I believe the theory in this case is that the water making contact with the surface of the bread allows the surface to get little hotter ...


0

I am about to make a pizza as soon as the dough rises in fact... using a store bought spaghetti sauce this time, as I'm tired... and hungry. I usually reduce the sauce on low simmer after adding a little Red Wine Vinegar to taste... That's usually all I add unless I'm making my own sauce.


1

Your question regarding pizza thickness, as you are making Neapolitan pizza the answer is: When stretched, the center of the dough must be no more than .4 centimeters (±10%) in thickness. From: The Serious Eats Guide To Pizza In Naples But this has nothing to do with sliding it into the oven or baking steel. While you add the toppings on your pizza ...


3

I agree with GdD that sliding well can be accomplished with even a very thin crust loaded with toppings, as long as you have something it can slide on. Semolina does seem ideally suited to this. Stretching very thin can, however, make the dough more likely to stick just because as you stretch, you often expose more of the interior moisture of the dough to ...


3

Sliding well has nothing to do with weight or thickness, although too thin makes the dough prone to tearing. A generous spread of ground semolina under the pizza dough after shaping will keep it from sticking to your counter while you top it, and in your oven when you bake it. The grainy semolina will act as a barrier, keeping the bottom of your dough off ...


3

I agree with previous answers that the stickiness is probably related to the long second proof at room temperature. I know because I often make use of a similar technique, though I use a higher hydration dough. Thus, it's probably close to as sticky as yours, even though I don't proof as long. After a first proof overnight (or for a couple days) in the ...


3

With a lean dough you can either use oil on the working surface and your hands to make it easier to handle, or a coarse milled grain like cornmeal or fine semolina. Personally I prefer semolina, as it is easier to clean up than oil, and cornmeal clings to the dough and gives an odd mouth-feel. A further point: you mentioned leaving the dough balls for ten ...


4

A super sticky dough is exactly what you want for pan pizza. Take a look at what Kenji from Serious Eats has to say about pan pizza dough. He uses a super-sticky, no-knead dough, but I bet yours would be fine for this application. I followed Kenji's advice to make this pizza, it was the best pan pizza I've ever had. Using the pan made dealing with the ...



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