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21

Normal double-acting baking powder makes CO2 (thus giving a rising effect) in two ways: when it gets wet, and when it is heated. Baking soda only makes CO2 when it gets wet. From Wikipedia: The acid in a baking powder can be either fast-acting or slow-acting.[6] A fast-acting acid reacts in a wet mixture with baking soda at room temperature, ...


20

Baking soda is pure sodium bicarbonate, while baking powder includes an acidifying agent (cream of tartar) and a drying agent (starch). You can substitute baking soda for baking powder if you already have an acidifying agent in a recipe (like buttermilk). http://chemistry.about.com/cs/foodchemistry/f/blbaking.htm


16

Yes, it is different. Does it matter? It depends. If you're going to use garlic in a stew or anything else that would 'dissolve' the regular garlic anyway, it doesn't really matter all that much in my opinion. If you want to preserve the texture and/or create a more 'urgent' garlic flavour in short-cooked food, I'd go with fresh. Sidenote: most of the ...


15

Natural is purely a marketing term, and it is essentially meaningless since it isn't regulated by the USDA (I'm assuming you are in the USA, I can't speak for other countries). Since the term isn't regulated (with the apparent exception of meat), any manufacturer can put it on any (non-meat) product that they want, weather it is actually "natural" or not. ...


14

The grades reflect how much light can get through some standard quantity of maple. The darker maple syrups tend to have a stronger maple flavor and tend to be harvested later in the season. The collected sap needs to be concentrated and purified to make the syrup, which is traditionally done by boiling and skimming off impurities. The USDA (United States ...


14

It depends on how broad your definition of "recipe" is. First, as Cos Callis pointed out, a home cook won't be affected even if a recipe was patented. IP law (=intelectual property) is a matter of civil law, not criminal law. If you hit someone over the head, this is criminal law and the country where this happened will sue you and put you in jail even if ...


13

There is a difference beyond just the price. All-Purpose flours are not the same: Southerners tend to make more quick breads, pies, cakes, etc. where tenderness is the primary quality factor. Southern brands of all-purpose flour such as White Lily, Martha White, Red Band, Adluh and others are typically milled from wheat that naturally has a lower ...


13

If you're looking for books, you could try "Roman Cookery" by Mark Grant or "The Classical Cookbook" by Andrew Dalby and Sally Grainger for ancient Roman food, or "The Philosopher's Kitchen" by Francine Segan, which combines ancient Greek and Roman cuisine. Many of these recipes are derived from the works of Apicius, but are not solely based on his ...


12

Dry rubs are one case that I can think of where dry is specifically necessary, so you can grind them up properly. The main advantage to dry herbs is that they're available year round. When you're dealing with winter dishes, dry herbs would've been the norm to have used at that time. If you are going to substitute, you'll need to add more (typically about ...


11

I would do it the other way round, I'd fry the sausages first, then add the veg. This has a few benefits as I see it:- The sausages will brown more evenly, purely aesthetic but some people will think they are not cooked if they are not brown. You'll get the oil out of the sausages so you'll have a better idea of how much oil to add when you add the veg, ...


11

The grades of Maple syrup indicate depth of flavor and amount of light transmittance. Grade A is the lighter with Grade B being darker. The letters are just a means of indicating variance of flavor/color, not a judge of quality. Lighter grades are usually used on pancakes, waffles, etc. while Grade B is best as an ingredient in cooking/baking due to the ...


11

They have a different ratio of white sugar to molasses. Therefore, dark brown sugar is more hygroscopic, and will have a deeper molasses flavor (and color, obviously) They're pretty similar, and you can usually get away with replacing one with the other, but if you want subtle flavors coming through, dark brown sugar might mask it. I've seen ...


8

I think the main reason pre-prepared garlic exists is that some people don't like working with raw garlic directly i.e. getting their fingers/hands smelly. You can't go wrong with raw garlic and it's easy to keep and prepare.


8

Sounds like you didn't roast sufficiently or not sufficiently hot. The outside should be really charred, and the inside will be not so watery.


8

McGee on Food and Cooking: An Encyclopedia of Kitchen Science, History and Culture will answer most questions on what the chemistry is behind most cooking processes, without being too academic.


7

Certain herbs are very mild when fresh and do not develop their full smell and flavour until dried; e.g. bayleaf, oregano. Fresh herbs generally have short storage times. When substituting you typically need to add much more of the herb, as drying shrinks it concentrating the flavour.


7

It sounds like you may be searing the steak for too long. Indeed, you want to initially be cooking the steak at a higher-than-normal temperature in order to sear it, but I'd suggest a period of more like 30 seconds each side, followed by slightly longer at a reduce temperature. At 650 degrees, the steak does not need long to sear. The same principle has ...


7

Since you note that the inside was nice and juicy, I doubt that salting 30 minutes in advance was the culprit. Either sear at a slightly lower temp or do it for less time. I just got a new grill and the "high" setting was much hotter than I expected and my first steaks seared much quicker than I expected. A note on the salting in advance: Cook's ...


7

Have you ever visited Gode Cookery? From the site: Many of the recipes in this site originate from true medieval & Renaissance sources, are fully documented, and have been adapted for use in the modern kitchen. Original sources & bibliographies are featured whenever possible; historical authenticity and research are our main concerns, along with ...


7

Don't think of that as dough. This looks like basically making a quiche base to put pizza toppings on. I don't see any reason to think this recipe won't be stable but it won't be anything like pizza crust. Still it sounds tasty.


7

After years of cooking, I don't really need this service anymore, but I sure did wish there was something good like this 5 years ago. I couldn't find anything then, though. However, I've seen a couple of sites pop up since then. I can't really testify to how well they work, because I haven't used any of them. But here are some things to explore: Recipe Key ...


7

Not really, but there haven't been that many studies in to the issue. An abstract of the most significant one can be found here. To summarise, the study tested people who had drunk black coffee, coffee with milk, and coffee with non-dairy creamer to see how much of the phenolic acid (one constituent of coffee that is supposed to have health benefits) ...


6

I think fresh garlic is much more flavorful! I tried the jarred garlic before, and I could definitely taste a difference. Yes, it's more convenient, but it's not as strong as fresh. A hand grater is useful when using fresh garlic. You won't have to chop and it helps prevent biting into larger pieces.


6

I've never had them, but they are indeed edible. Due to the high amount of potassium in them they can be bitter. The World Carrot Museum (lol) even has an entire page for carrot greens, including several recipes. Excerpt: They ARE edible and are highly nutritive, rich in protein, minerals and vitamins. The tops of the carrots are loaded with potassium ...


6

I like hobodave's answer, but I'll put my .02 bucks on a negative answer: I tend to throw cooking debris in the stock pot. Onion skins, garlic peels, anything I might otherwise throw away. It's stock, right? Stock and stuffing exist to make use of leftovers. But don't do this with carrot tops, it'll make your stock taste wonky. Had to make thanksgiving ...


6

I think a good recipe has several basic components. An introduction. It should describe the dish, its appeal, briefly its history, its usage, and what techniques it involves. An assessment of the prep time, cooking time, cost, and difficulty. Clearly sized and organized ingredients (wet/dry, major/minor, by stage, role). Simply written steps which ...


6

I don't know. I'm not Mr. OMG-Bacteria's-Gonna-Kill-YOU but I'd not want to keep a thing of starchy water (which is an ideal bacterial growth medium) in my fridge for more than a day or two. Add to that the fact that it's basically so cheap as to be free, and it's right at the bottom of the list of things I'd save.


5

It actually depends on the quality of the shortening you're able to get. You might think they're all the same, but you'd be wrong. When I was taught how to make pies, we used shortening, and the crusts were perfect. However, I was told that for home baking, the shortening you buy in supermarkets (Crisco, normally) just isn't going to cut it and to use ...


5

I'm not 100% sure but I found this site that explains what fleur de sel is. It says that Like other sea salts, fleur de sel is harvested by evaporating sea water. However, to harvest fleur de sel, workers gently skim the top layer of the sea salt from partially evaporated pools, before it sinks to the bottom again. These salt crystals are very fine, ...



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