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5

Duck generally has a considerable amount of fat, so there will probably be a good deal of fat in the pan drippings. That's not going to be a problem if you just blend the plums themselves; they're already full of water (i.e. juice), so they're not going to actually absorb a significant amount of the fat, they just might have a little fat film on the part ...


5

Maybe you had the Greengage plum.


3

The "fresh fruit" aromatic compound in plums is likely ethyl propionate, which has a boiling point at sea level of just under 100°C. The prominent flavor compound for prunes, according to this study, is 3-methylnonane-2,4-dione, which has a much higher boiling point of about 235°C (likely much higher than the temperatures you would reach during jam/preserve ...


2

I believe these are also known as Greengages in English speaking countries (well, in the UK, at least)


2

Tart fruits work well in jellies and jams, or as candied fruit. These all allow you to vary the sugar content to get the level of sweetness you want, plus you don't have to worry about botulism as much. You could also try a fruit-infused brandy: cut fruit into slices, and layer fruit/sugar/fruit/sugar into a tall lidded jar. Cover with a spirit of your ...


2

It may have been the act of leaving the plums on top of the cake, covered overnight at room-temperature. This might have concentrated the natural ethylene produced by the plum enough to cause it to ripen by breaking down the starches and turning it into sugars.


1

I think freezing would be your best bet - not fantastic for the texture, but when defrosted you could make a pie/cobbler or other cooked item with them. Plenty of web sites (eg http://www.fruitexpert.co.uk/using-up-a-plum-glut.html) say you can just halve them and freeze them on open tray, then when they're frozen move them into plastic bags. It's the ...


1

This won't be a very scientific answer, but I likewise experience an over abundance of plums every year and I am likewise not a fan of prunes. I've had a lot of luck though turning my plums into plum sauce, rather than actual jam (not the kind you put on spring rolls). I use less sugar, no added pectin, and only cook until the plums breakdown into a mushy ...


1

You can consider making plum syrup or plum wine, sure they are of very quick and easy "preparation", but they need some time to "age". One example of Japanese plum syrup and plum wine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlBNdRKNhJI


1

I'd consider a plum buckle or other plum cake. As necessary you can up the sugar to compensate for the extra-sour plums. A free-form tart adding berries to the plums as a filling also sounds tasty and like it would have a lovely texture. Perhaps blackberries or raspberries?


1

I recently sampled these at a Babylon Market in Tucson, Arizona. The owner called them "green plums" but also the name you mentioned, "janarek." He said they're not easy to find -- he gets them from a company in California that imports them. You might look around for a Middle Eastern market = )



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