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37

I have tried many techniques but what gets the best results for me is dropping them directly in water and vinegar. Complete method below: Take eggs out of fridge early and leave to reach room temp. It is okay to leave them out of fridge overnight if cooking for breakfast. Fill pan with water - I use frying pan with minimum depth of 4cm. Add splash of ...


24

Heston Blumenthal has brought his unique scientific approach to bear on this recently. The main pointers for a perfect poached egg are as follows: The egg must be fresh. A fresh egg has a thicker, more gel-like albumen. As it gets older, this becomes watery, and so just disperses throughout the water when you add it. To test if your egg is fresh, place it ...


17

Vinegar and salt both help the proteins (albumin) to denature (unwind) more quickly and link up to form a network of proteins, thus setting the egg. The quicker the proteins denature the less feathering there will be around the edges and the nicer looking the egg.


17

I fill a tall frying pan (or pot) with water. Add some white vinegar. Let it come to a boil Add the eggs. Don't make it too overcrowded Take it out with a flipper or a spoon with holes when they look done.


12

Egg whites need to be heated up to a certain temperature in order to coagulate ("set"). Lowering the pH (increasing the acidity) of the cooking liquid is one way to lower the temperature required for coagulation of the egg whites. So, in a way, this does prevent "feathering" of the eggs, but not because of any direct reaction; rather, the reason the eggs ...


9

The only thing you did wrong was to try to poach an egg in oil, at least hot oil. Dropping an egg into really hot oil is going to cause all the water in the egg to turn to steam very quickly, hence the nuclear mutant effect you no doubt got. If you want to poach in oil then you need to keep the temperature way down. I don't see any reason you couldn't ...


7

Acidify the water with lemon or white vinegar (balsamic vinegar would be a waste to use for this, plus would stain the eggs) to facilitate protein coaugulation. When the water is boiling, break the egg in a small dish, then create a whirpool by stirring the water just before putting the egg in. This will help to make the white coaugulate around the yolk. ...


7

The milk sugars will add a sweetness to the dish. Also, after the fish comes out, the milk can be reduced/thickened to make a bechemel sauce.


6

Take some microwave plastic wrap and place it in a ramekin; push the plastic into the corners and lightly oil the inside with a brush. Gently break a fresh egg into the centre of the plastic lined ramekin, then gently pull up the sides of the plastic wrap and tie it off with string or a plastic band. Place the pouch in boiling water for (depends on your ...


6

Personally, I cannot stand the taste of vinegar in a poached egg. Here is the method that I use with perfect results every time: In a covered saute pan, bring water to a full boil. Add about a teaspoon of salt to the water. The salt performs the same function as vinegar: keep the egg whites from scattering and you ending up with poached yolks. Break ...


6

A few tricks I've seen used in restaurants: Add a bit of vinegar to the water (supposed to cut scum, keeps egg together better) Increase the surface area of the pan (many restaurants use a large rectangular pan for poaching) Use more water (reduce the ratio of protein bits to water) Slide the eggs in more carefully and use fresher eggs (less protein ...


6

By hunting chicken in a game preserve? ;-) http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--324/poaching-chicken.asp The essence of poaching chicken is a gentle boil in water, stock or other flavorful liquid. I really like poaching chunks of chicken in a thin sweet-and-sour sauce, then thickening the sauce, adding pineapple chunks, and serving over rice.


5

Just simmer water, and poach the egg. The vinegar is simply there to help coagulate the white. I never use vinegar for poaching eggs. You just have to try to be as careful as possible when setting the egg into the water. have the water at a bare simmer, not a rolling boil. These things will help to keep the white intact.


5

Actually, hard boiling is one of the recommended uses for older eggs, since older eggs are much easier to peel. I'd highly recommend against using old eggs if you were going to whip the whites, for example, or any other heavy "structural" application. Quiche would probably be fine.


4

A 63-degree egg is slow cooked in the shell in a water bath of 63 degrees celsius. The shell is removed after the cooking process. A poached egg is removed from the shell before cooking and cooked in simmering water for a short amount of time. According to this experiment, cooking eggs at slightly different temperatures in a water bath seems to make a ...


4

It's supposed to help with cooking the albumen in such a way that it doesn't get all feathery at the edges. I have no idea what the actual chemical reaction is, though. I've also heard of people adding a pickle to the poaching liquid instead of vinegar directly.


4

Personally I don't like the whirlpool method as in my experience it doesn't work that well most of the time. I use a saucepan with an inverted bowl in the bottom to prevent the egg coming into contact with direct heat, but the most important factor is fresh eggs. As eggs age, the white gets more and more watery. Thus when you put an old egg in water to ...


4

Found this link for you... The Art of Poaching Fish Milk - Milk is good for poaching flatfish, such as dover sole, turbot and halibut. Like a quality enamel, it makes the texture of the fish more resilient and adds an extra "shine" to chalky white fish.


3

This method may not be practical if you want a lot of poached eggs but this is what I do. wait for the water to come to the boil turn down heat somewhat use a spoon to stir the water until a visible vortex forms in the middle of the pot gently pour in the egg in the vortex wait until done


3

Poaching is a gentle process - the milk isn't boiling so there is no risk of it burning or the like. It will of course not spoil in the sense of it going off, that's a totally different process. Fresh milk is better because, well, it's fresh. Powdered milk would probably work, but if you have fresh, use that.


3

You might try coddling them. Butter a ramekin or similar heatproof cup, crack in an egg, then cover with foil and place in a pan of near boiling water until the egg is done to your liking, usually around ten minutes. You can also try boiling the egg in its shell for 30 seconds or so before cracking and poaching it as usual. The initial boil sets the egg ...


3

Sugar stabilizes proteins and reduces foaming (salting in). I'm not sure how much sugar you'd need to add to your egg water to reduce dissipation and strand formation, but some protein structures are affected positively by sucrose concentrations below 30 grams per liter.


2

you can buy some things (in the UK, maybe not in the US) called poach pods which I use, and work a treat. They're £5 for 2 (or about $8) I guess. They don't take up much room when stored as they stack:- http://www.lakeland.co.uk/poach-pods/F/product/12116


2

Just to add to the other answers ... the fresher the egg (properly free range helps too) the better the shape and firmness of the result, whatever technique or trick you use.


2

Pursuing taste, some chefs aren't really concerned about wasting a couple cups of milk. Adding milk makes the fish tastes more tender and more "gentle" than just adding sugar. However, you don't really need that if you're not going for it or you think it's an absolute waste. In my opinion, the taste of some fish is rich enough. You can get milk-like soup ...


2

Poaching is about cooking something gently, until just done. This is good for chicken breasts: white meat has very little fat and connective tissue, which makes it well-suited to this. It's at its most tender when it's not overcooked. Dark meat will be fine too. As with most other methods of cooking, it just needs to reach the appropriate temperature in the ...


2

You can poach in any medium you'd like. You are only concerned with heating the egg enough to coagulate the whites and/or yolks if you want. Eggs poached in tomato sauce are amazing. The only caveats to poaching in other liquids other than water is the pH and temperature. Obviously you can't get water above the boil point without pressure so your not super ...


2

well that qualifies as a ripple in your chef hat. (in the old days the number of ripples in the hat meant the number of different ways the chef could make eggs). Here are some tricks for poaching eggs [in water]: Use an 8-10" [non-stick] skillet filled to the brim and bring to boil and turn the heat to lowest. The idea is to prevent the egg from sinking ...


2

As stated above in various comments it is a complicated question. I do have some info. First read khymos I think that the formula they have answers the question :-) They have a answer in a graph but it is only displayed for a very small range of chicken eggs. This page in Norwegian gives you a online tool to manipulate the size of the egg and get the ...



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