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14

True southern grits are made with ground hominy whereas polenta is simply ground cornmeal. The proper name for them is actually hominy grits. You can make "grits" out of untreated corn, but these are corn grits and not really found in southern US cuisine. Grits are typically a much coarser grind than polenta. Hominy is corn that has been nixtamalized, which ...


9

It definitely does not need to be stirred continuously. Fairly frequently, yes, to avoid burning on the bottom, but not constantly. Cooking for more or less time has more impact on texture than flavor. Cooked briefly, you get more of a grain-like cream of wheat texture. Cooked long, you get a creamier, smoother result. Both can be good, but the creamy style ...


8

Cooks Illustrated, in the March 2010 issue, tackled this problem in their usually obsessive fashion. The full recipe is behind their paywall, but they found that a pinch of baking soda added to coarse-ground degerminated cornmeal resulted in a shorter cooking time over low heat (about 30 minutes total), with whisking needed for the first minute, about 5 ...


7

You definitely don't have to. In fact Alton Brown's recipe calls for only stirring 3-4 times during the cooking process -> http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/savory-polenta-recipe/index.html


5

Corn meal is sold as polenta in the UK. It is sold in fine and coarse grades, however I've found that even the course grade is not as coarse as typical US corn meal, so you'll want to buy a finer US grade as a replacement, but it is the same thing.


5

Sounds like you want to pop frozen slices into a frying pan? That should work just fine. The slicing allows for quick freezing, which decreases the size of water crystals and the effect they have on food. And quick frying keeps the disturbance of the polenta to a minimum. In general, basic polenta should be fine, since starch, the many component to ...


4

The technique is very basic: stir together the all of the ingredients in a buttered baking dish, and bake in a moderate oven for about an hour, with one or two stirs near the end. The water ratio is slightly reduced from the stove top method, as there is less evaporation. See, for example, this version from Shockingly Delicious adapting the recipe from ...


4

Some people say it's just preparation and the base is the same ground corn / corn meal, some people say for grits you need (more coarsely) ground hominy (which is corn that has been soaked in lye or lime). Polenta can be found loose and really solid: grits are generally loose. Corn type may also differ, as may the dish's 'typical cultural trappings' (fat ...


3

Yes, it depends on brand, humidity, etc. My local variety is 1:4 to 1:4.5 (polenta:water) to get to that softness level Add nothing else until you have the polenta at the desired consistency and softness


3

If you try some when it's only just come to a boil, it's pretty obvious that it's both of the things you suggest. The cornmeal won't be cooked (it'll be gritty, still half dry, not soft) and there'll be too much liquid still. You could of course use less liquid, but that wouldn't change the fact that polenta, like most other food, doesn't cook instantly. ...


2

You cannot make grits, because by definition, true hominy grits are treated with alkali which is what makes them different than plain cornmeal or polenta. Searching for harina pan polenta indicates a variety of recipes are possible (most are in Spanish, so I cannot read them). However, it doesn't appear that a porridge type dish is the usual application ...


2

Reading the definition of grits ("a dish of coarsely ground corn kernels boiled with water or milk"), the only difference I see with polenta (living in an Italian region where it's largely used) is that polenta is not made with milk. Other differences could be: The coarse grade of the ground corn kernels. The type of corn kernels used; we use also ...


2

slice it, top it with a little tomato sauce or tomato slices, basil and mozzarella, toss into the oven for a few minutes until its warmed and the cheese is melty (or nuke it). Maybe add a slice of pepperoni.


2

You can slice it thin, cut it into pieces, dip into flour and fry it in oil or butter according to your preference. Or use it as a base for something with a sauce like chicken cacciatore. Enjoy!


2

I don't think you're going to get a good ground beef substitute from polenta, for that I would recommend TVP or other vegan soy crumbles, seitan or even mushrooms. However, if you're interested in making a veggie burger out of polenta, I'm sure you could look online for a recipe (for example here, but you may find others). It's certainly not going to taste ...


1

As your question stands, the possible answers are essentially: You used too much liquid or too little cornmeal. You didn't cook it long enough. You didn't cool it enough for it to firm up. Polenta is the sort of food that you should make by trusting your senses over a recipe. You should be able to tell, with a little bit of experience, whether it's too ...


1

For better authenticity (I know you are not asking for that, but still...) you might want to replace the olive oil with butter, or some other tasty animal fat. The polenta areas in Italy are mostly (*) not olive oil areas, and I can imagine that the olive oil, if it is a good one, would add a marked taste of its own. 1:4 sounds good, remember that polenta ...


1

I use a double boiler and it cooks for ~1.5 hours with only a few stirs. I got the method from Lynn Rosetto Kasper and it works great. No muss, no fuss. Link: http://splendidtable.publicradio.org/recipes/misc_polenta.html


1

Sounds like polenta freezes very well for up to 3 months. It sounds like you need to make sure it cools to room temperature first, and as with everything you put in the freezer, make sure it's tightly wrapped.


1

You can serve them with a good dripping of aged balsamic vinegar. Also, if you have access to Italian soft cheeses, like Squacquerone or Stracchino, they get along really well.


1

You can keep it in the fridge for few days. The simplest way to reuse it is to grill it and then serve with cheese (like gorgonzola) or crème fraiche.


1

My wife makes (made up?) a super-quick tasty dish: Sautee spinach, mushrooms & garlic (2 cloves if you like it garlicky) layer polenta on the bottom of a baking dish Add spinach/mushroom/garlic mix Add black beans (1 can) Mix in a little salsa Cover with cheese Bake at 350 for 20-25 minutes until the cheese is melted.



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