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15

From a quick search, it looks like this is just a different variety of popcorn, called mushroom. The normal kind is called butterfly. The two are mentioned in the wikipedia article (last paragraph of the linked section), along with a photo. It looks like it's pretty easy to buy online, if you prefer it. The round kernels are a little sturdier and easier to ...


14

A better instruction would be "do not rely entirely on the functionality of the popcorn button on your microwave, since microwaves vary widely as do bags of popcorn." But that's longer, and kind of complicated, so they abbreviate it "do not use popcorn button". There's no problem with the power setting of the popcorn button, only with the timing. You should ...


13

Olive oil has a notoriously low smoke point. If you're looking for something nutritious to pop corn with, try avocado oil. While burned food tastes yucky, and there is (some) evidence that a steady diet consisting mainly of burnt olive oil may be (slightly) carcinogenic, it is highly unlikely you did anything worse than ruin your munchies.


12

I think this is primarily going to come down to the method of cooking and the flavorings. I think it's unlikely that you can buy a microwave popcorn that will taste like the movie theatre. You'll need a specific popcorn pan so that you can stir the popcorn continuously and that will also vent some of the steam from cooking (which a normal pot won't do. ...


11

Use a large heavy-bottomed pot (idealy 3-4 quart size) and place it over medium to medium-high heat until you can hold your hand about 6 inches above the bottom surface and feel the heat radiating off it. At that point add about 1-2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to the pan, tilting to coat the bottom evenly. Drop in a kernel or two and cover. When the ...


10

Use a carbon-steel wok! The shape works very well to keep the unpopped kernels in the hot oil, while the popped kernels end up on the cooler sides. I usually use about 2 T of oil and 1/3 c of popcorn to make enough for two people. If you want to keep with the Chinese theme, Szechuan peppercorn-salt goes extremely well on popcorn! To make it, grind Szechuan ...


9

If you use an air popper, you don't need any oil. I still add a little bit back in (with a pump sprayer), so the salt will stick ... but you could theoretically use none at all.n


8

Popcorn kernels pop because moisture is trapped inside of a relatively gas-tight shell. As the kernels are heated, the water inside the kernel turns to steam. The shell of the kernel keeps the steam from expanding, so pressure builds up inside of the kernel until the whole things blows open. If the kernel doesn't have enough moisture inside of it or if the ...


7

How you are popping your corn makes a difference. Air popped corn with flavoring added afterwards may be healthier but it is difficult to make flavorings adhere. Using an agitated oil popper and putting the flavoring infused in the oil will make the difference. The flavors will be part of the kernel and not just stuck to the outside. Lately I've seen ...


7

I'll bet you could make your own powdered butter using melted butter and tapioca maltodextrin (Ab-Zorbit or N-Zorbit). Just mix the butter with the powder until it is absorbed and a very light 'solid' consistency, then rub through a fine sieve over the popcorn whilst you toss it. I think this would work really well as the stabiliser is quite sweet anyway, ...


7

There are two sides of your question, a food safety side and a nutrition side. The food safety answers the question: does the event of eating this popcorn add to your chances of you ending up in hospital with acute symptoms of food poisoning? To that, there is a clear answer: no. Burnt oil is not acutely toxic. The nutrition answers the question: does ...


6

Interesting question. Did search 'how do I make puffed rice'. Came up with some interesting information. There are some writings that suggest that puffed rice can be made like popcorn; get the moisture in the grains of rice to the correct level (no idea what the level should be, experimentation should guide you I suppose) and then (depending on what ...


6

1) Melt 1-2 tablespoons of butter (more if you're a butter-head). 2) Fill a clean paper lunch bag half-way with your popped popcorn. 3) Drizzle your melted butter along the sides of the half-filled bag, fold over the top, and shake vigorously for at least 30 seconds. 4) Repeat as necessary until all your popcorn is well-buttered (and unsoggy).


6

Ok, here is the solution... Use real butter and render it before you put in the popcorn kernels. Rendering: Allow butter to boil in a pan on the stovetop and a white foam to build up on the top of the melted butter Remove from heat and scrape the foam off with a spoon Put the butter back on the heat, but be careful not to burn it. (You might want to ...


6

All these answers are basically correct. Something to add. I have found that covering the bottom of whatever pan you are using (except the wok or other round bottoms) with kernels (so that the kernels are evenly distributed and there are no kernels on top of one another) just so it is covered, but no more, the volume of corn, once popped, is close to the ...


5

I work at a movie theater and we do pop our popcorn in coconut oil. Also the popcorn popper that we use is basically a huge whirley pop, so any regular whirley pop with coconut oil should work. We also put the salt seasoning in the popper with the kernels, which is why they all come out with that orange color, although I don't know if you're supposed to put ...


5

I never tried it, but I don't think it is a good idea. The point of popcorn popping is that you cook the inside of the kernel within its hard shell until the internal pressure increases so much that it breaks the shell, releasing the starchy liquid inside as a foam. You need a pressure gradient, with higher pressure inside the kernel than on the outside. ...


5

If you want dry seasonings to stick to popcorn, you will probably need to add a liquid to adhere them with. You could try adding butter or oil to your popcorn while it is hot, then adding the salt and tossing it together. If you're avoiding extra fat, a few spritzes of a non-stick spray (like Pam) might do the trick without adding significant fat.


4

I make my butter for my popcorn in the same pan. Make the popcorn in the usual manner, then turn the heat off on the pan. I then toss in the amount of butter I desire to apply. The leftover heat melts the butter pretty fast (actually it slightly browns but that is desired by me). The butter is hot enough to be thin so it gets applied in smaller amounts at ...


4

The key is to have the finest possible salt. One way to do this is to take any salt you like, and grind it fine in a mortar and pestle. This just takes a few seconds, and then you can customize to a particular sea salt you enjoy and avoid the need to buy a special popcorn salt. A rotating action in the mortar and pestle (as opposed to pounding) is most ...


4

I store my popcorn in the freezer in an old mayo jar with the lid tightly screwed on. As Michael says, dud popcorn has lost moisture. Add a tablespoon or so of water to the jar and put in the fridge (not the freezer for this part) a few days and see if that helps. Storing uncovered in the fridge or freezer will remove moisture if you have a frost-free ...


4

Don't eat the popcorn straight from the bag. Put it into a nice large bowl. This will provide enough room for the unpopped kernels to fall to the bottom. As for hull shards between your teeth, dental floss or a toothpick will take care of that quickly and relatively neatly. Avoid burnt pieces by watching as you pour the popcorn into the bowl and as you take ...


4

In a sense, both manufacturers are correct. Most older microwaves do not have a humidity sensor; in these microwaves, the Popcorn button is a simple pre-programmed timer. Some allow you to adjust the time by 10-second increments as you use it and will remember the new value, but even cheaper ones simply come pre-programmed. The manufacturer is simply saying ...


3

There are 2 keys to minimizing the loose kernels, Quality Popcorn Quality Appliance For Quality Popcorn it starts with "Orville's" for basic quality grocery store popcorn. However there are a variety of popping corns available. I received a gift pack like this several years ago. Searching Amazon for Pop Corn will lead you to a variety of choices. As ...


3

Interesting question. so I pulled out a hot air popper (you wouldn't want to use a oil popper to try this.) and put some popped dry corn into a food process and let-her-rip. I wouldn't call the results "masa" but it might be usable for an ingredient in a breading. I call your attention to the book "POPCORN". It has a nice collection of recipes which include ...


3

Melt the butter carefully in a microwave using a pyrex measuring cup with a spout that can allow for more controlled drizzling. Overheating/frying can cause for more oily separation. Using an extra-large spherical bowl without handles, spin the bowl with one hand while drizzling 1/2-1/3 the butter as thinly as possible with the other. Toss. Add ...


3

My method is to melt the butter then pour it into a large empty bowl and roll the bowl around to spread over the surface. Then dump the hot popped popcorn in, and use a spoon to stir it and mix it up well. Each popcorn will pick up just a bit of butter on each one, and none will be soggy. Works well for me.


3

Put half the popcorn in a metal bowl. Hold a small pot of melted butter over the bowl. Spin the bowl as you slowly drip the butter. Start the drip from the outside and work your way into the center of the bowl. The trick is to spin the bowl of popcorn to disperse the butter, not the other way around. If you swirl the pot of butter as you pour, you will most ...


3

If you are using microwaved popcorn, after you take it out of the microwave, pull two opposite corners just slightly, so that opening of the bag barely opens... maybe 5mm wide at most. Turn the bag upside down and shake over the sink (or trash can once you are good at it) and almost all of the unpopped kernels will fall through the hole. This of course ...


3

I'll come out and say "no, you can't make microwave popcorn in a conventional oven." For popcorn to pop, the kernel must reach a temperature well above boiling (which builds up steam, causing the kernel to explode). It must do so very quickly, otherwise the moisture will just slowly evaporate out, simply drying the kernel rather than popping it. Microwave ...



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