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18

From a quick search, it looks like this is just a different variety of popcorn, called mushroom. The normal kind is called butterfly. The two are mentioned in the wikipedia article (last paragraph of the linked section), along with a photo. It looks like it's pretty easy to buy online, if you prefer it. The round kernels are a little sturdier and easier to ...


14

A better instruction would be "do not rely entirely on the functionality of the popcorn button on your microwave, since microwaves vary widely as do bags of popcorn." But that's longer, and kind of complicated, so they abbreviate it "do not use popcorn button". There's no problem with the power setting of the popcorn button, only with the timing. You should ...


13

Olive oil has a notoriously low smoke point. If you're looking for something nutritious to pop corn with, try avocado oil. While burned food tastes yucky, and there is (some) evidence that a steady diet consisting mainly of burnt olive oil may be (slightly) carcinogenic, it is highly unlikely you did anything worse than ruin your munchies.


12

I think this is primarily going to come down to the method of cooking and the flavorings. I think it's unlikely that you can buy a microwave popcorn that will taste like the movie theatre. You'll need a specific popcorn pan so that you can stir the popcorn continuously and that will also vent some of the steam from cooking (which a normal pot won't do. ...


11

Use a large heavy-bottomed pot (idealy 3-4 quart size) and place it over medium to medium-high heat until you can hold your hand about 6 inches above the bottom surface and feel the heat radiating off it. At that point add about 1-2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to the pan, tilting to coat the bottom evenly. Drop in a kernel or two and cover. When the ...


11

I worked at a movie theater for a few years in high school. We cooked popcorn in coconut oil and applied Popcorn Salt (the kind that includes artificial flavorings in addition to the salt) during cooking and at time of serving per customer's request. For application after cooking we stocked many flavors of a brand of popcorn seasoning known as "Kernel ...


10

Use a carbon-steel wok! The shape works very well to keep the unpopped kernels in the hot oil, while the popped kernels end up on the cooler sides. I usually use about 2 T of oil and 1/3 c of popcorn to make enough for two people. If you want to keep with the Chinese theme, Szechuan peppercorn-salt goes extremely well on popcorn! To make it, grind Szechuan ...


10

The way I do it is put 1-2 tbsp of oil in my pot, add 1/3 cup or so of corn, cover, and heat on medium until it starts popping, then turn down a bit and shake the pot occasionally until it is all popped. So, not oil free, but not a whole lot of oil either.


9

If you use an air popper, you don't need any oil. I still add a little bit back in (with a pump sprayer), so the salt will stick ... but you could theoretically use none at all.n


9

Popcorn kernels pop because moisture is trapped inside of a relatively gas-tight shell. As the kernels are heated, the water inside the kernel turns to steam. The shell of the kernel keeps the steam from expanding, so pressure builds up inside of the kernel until the whole things blows open. If the kernel doesn't have enough moisture inside of it or if the ...


8

How you are popping your corn makes a difference. Air popped corn with flavoring added afterwards may be healthier but it is difficult to make flavorings adhere. Using an agitated oil popper and putting the flavoring infused in the oil will make the difference. The flavors will be part of the kernel and not just stuck to the outside. Lately I've seen ...


8

Yes, there are popcorn flavorings available in most grocery stores. In the US, those can usually be found with the popcorn. The thing that makes popcorn salt different from table salt is that it is very fine, that's why it sticks better. You can turn table salt into popcorn salt in the food processor, or buy popcorn salt. Another fun thing for popcorn is ...


7

Another option is to make your popcorn in a pot using butter as the oil for the bottom. I find that if you toast the unpopped popcorn kernels in the butter, it gives a bit of a butter flavor to the entire pot -- less than if you were to put butter on the top, but plenty for me.


7

I'll bet you could make your own powdered butter using melted butter and tapioca maltodextrin (Ab-Zorbit or N-Zorbit). Just mix the butter with the powder until it is absorbed and a very light 'solid' consistency, then rub through a fine sieve over the popcorn whilst you toss it. I think this would work really well as the stabiliser is quite sweet anyway, ...


7

There are two sides of your question, a food safety side and a nutrition side. The food safety answers the question: does the event of eating this popcorn add to your chances of you ending up in hospital with acute symptoms of food poisoning? To that, there is a clear answer: no. Burnt oil is not acutely toxic. The nutrition answers the question: does ...


6

All these answers are basically correct. Something to add. I have found that covering the bottom of whatever pan you are using (except the wok or other round bottoms) with kernels (so that the kernels are evenly distributed and there are no kernels on top of one another) just so it is covered, but no more, the volume of corn, once popped, is close to the ...


6

The basic solution is to reduce the amount of popcorn you are buttering at any one time, rather than trying to do an entire batch at once. This can be done by putting some into an oversize bowl, so you can stir it up while drizzling. Then transfer to the serving bowl(s).


6

1) Melt 1-2 tablespoons of butter (more if you're a butter-head). 2) Fill a clean paper lunch bag half-way with your popped popcorn. 3) Drizzle your melted butter along the sides of the half-filled bag, fold over the top, and shake vigorously for at least 30 seconds. 4) Repeat as necessary until all your popcorn is well-buttered (and unsoggy).


6

Ok, here is the solution... Use real butter and render it before you put in the popcorn kernels. Rendering: Allow butter to boil in a pan on the stovetop and a white foam to build up on the top of the melted butter Remove from heat and scrape the foam off with a spoon Put the butter back on the heat, but be careful not to burn it. (You might want to ...


6

Interesting question. Did search 'how do I make puffed rice'. Came up with some interesting information. There are some writings that suggest that puffed rice can be made like popcorn; get the moisture in the grains of rice to the correct level (no idea what the level should be, experimentation should guide you I suppose) and then (depending on what ...


6

My two favorites: Salt and freshly ground black pepper - just grind right onto the bowl. Nori seaweed, sugar, salt, and dried chiles, powdered. The powdered mix can be stored for quite a while. Original source: http://www.plantoeat.com/blog/2010/12/fusion-popcorn/ My wife's suggestion: Brewer's/nutritional yeast (somewhat cheesy, can be an ...


5

I work at a movie theater and we do pop our popcorn in coconut oil. Also the popcorn popper that we use is basically a huge whirley pop, so any regular whirley pop with coconut oil should work. We also put the salt seasoning in the popper with the kernels, which is why they all come out with that orange color, although I don't know if you're supposed to put ...


5

Anyone ever try just popping with your regular oil, but 50/50 mixed with India Mustard oil, and then before dumping the popcorn into the oil, add 1 tsp of Turmeric powder, and 1 tsp of Reshampatti chilly powder ( hot India ground chilli ) in with the popping corn ? When it pops, you get a hot curry taste, and an atomic yellow colored corn. Salt with ...


5

My fat-free flavoring of choice is a bit of lime juice and chile powder tossed with the popcorn in a large bag. Sometimes I toss by hand in the bowl. I find the lime juice doesn't dampen the popcorn as much as water and adds a nice flavor.


5

I'll come out and say "no, you can't make microwave popcorn in a conventional oven." For popcorn to pop, the kernel must reach a temperature well above boiling (which builds up steam, causing the kernel to explode). It must do so very quickly, otherwise the moisture will just slowly evaporate out, simply drying the kernel rather than popping it. Microwave ...


5

I never tried it, but I don't think it is a good idea. The point of popcorn popping is that you cook the inside of the kernel within its hard shell until the internal pressure increases so much that it breaks the shell, releasing the starchy liquid inside as a foam. You need a pressure gradient, with higher pressure inside the kernel than on the outside. ...


5

If you want dry seasonings to stick to popcorn, you will probably need to add a liquid to adhere them with. You could try adding butter or oil to your popcorn while it is hot, then adding the salt and tossing it together. If you're avoiding extra fat, a few spritzes of a non-stick spray (like Pam) might do the trick without adding significant fat.


4

I make my butter for my popcorn in the same pan. Make the popcorn in the usual manner, then turn the heat off on the pan. I then toss in the amount of butter I desire to apply. The leftover heat melts the butter pretty fast (actually it slightly browns but that is desired by me). The butter is hot enough to be thin so it gets applied in smaller amounts at ...


4

The key is to have the finest possible salt. One way to do this is to take any salt you like, and grind it fine in a mortar and pestle. This just takes a few seconds, and then you can customize to a particular sea salt you enjoy and avoid the need to buy a special popcorn salt. A rotating action in the mortar and pestle (as opposed to pounding) is most ...


4

I store my popcorn in the freezer in an old mayo jar with the lid tightly screwed on. As Michael says, dud popcorn has lost moisture. Add a tablespoon or so of water to the jar and put in the fridge (not the freezer for this part) a few days and see if that helps. Storing uncovered in the fridge or freezer will remove moisture if you have a frost-free ...



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