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13

They say to cook until 190F because that's the temperature at which the stuff that actually makes your slow-roasted pork moist, the collagen, fat, etc. is breaking down and coating the meat. Less than that and you'll have all those bits still intact in your shoulder, which you don't want. ATK explains this in their footnote on the recipe: LOW OVEN ...


5

Going to that temperature ensures that the collagen breaks down in the shoulder. Much higher than that and it will start to dry out. Reaching 190 though is a good point and if you cooked it slow it will be fork tender. The bone will even slide out clean! Now all you need is a smoker for those pork shoulders and you'll be set!


4

You need a slicing knife - a very thin, very long, very sharp blade, with kullens. Thin (measured top to bottom), because you don't need the heft or maneuverability of a chef's knife, and the less metal in contact with the meat as you cut it, the better. Long, because you don't want to saw at the meat - the metal that is in contact will pull a small amount ...


3

Pork shoulder is extremely forgiving. You are looking for an outcome, not a time, and not an absolute temperature. Cook it until it is tender, which indicates the collagen is sufficiently converted to gelatin. That may or may not have happened at a particular temperature, because the conversion process is time dependent, and the rate is temperature ...


3

It will probably be much more amenable to slicing at refrigerator temperatures, as the gelatin you have created from the long, slow braise is much more solid. However, most people would consider fork-tender pork a positive outcome.


2

I am a former pro chef and serious home cook. I can assure you that the temperatures talked about here are way too high. Most chefs do not cook meats to 190 because that would get them fired or demoted to dishwasher. Low and slow pork is awesome at 145-150 degrees, you will not see any blood and it will be med-well. The idea with low and slow is to keep that ...


2

Sadly no mater what you do, you are going to come out with non-optimal results. I would go with the oven method over the grill as you need to get the meat up, but you want to do it with out losing all the juice/fat you have already taken all the trouble to convert to gelatin. The grill is going to raise the outside of the meat much quicker that the inside ...


2

According to Modernist Cooking Made Easy (emphasis added): For medium rare cooked pork shoulder, the meat should be held at 135°F or 57.2°C, while medium cooked meat is done at 145°F or 62.8°C. If a traditional well done shoulder is desired, it should be cooked at 155°F or 68.3°C. No matter what temperature range is used, the pork shoulder should ...


1

The lowest simmer is about 180-185F. That's about as low as you'd want to go. Theoretically, you could go lower (and you certainly could go lower for sous-vide), but significantly lower in the oven or on the stove leaves little margin of error for safety. You'd want to cook your shoulder to at least 160F because that's the temperature at which collagen ...


1

When you cut it, try propping it up a little on one side - say to maybe a 45 degree angle or so - so that the piece you are cutting off does not fall from the roast as you cut it. Depending on your situation, this may take some ingenuity to make it work right (without dumping the roast onto the floor... ;). As for the knife to use, try cutting it with a ...



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