Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Meat is tough for two reasons: 1- An abundance of connective tissue. 2- When over cooked. In your case I'd say you probably have both problems. Cheap meat is tough meat. It is from older animals or well worked muscle groups. This means that it has been fortified with a lot of extra connective tissue. It also means it has a lot of flavor. The solution to ...


14

I don't think a pork sirloin roast will stand up to that kind of cooking very well. That is a very lean piece of meat, which does not lend itself to long cooking times at low temperatures. That type of cooking is best reserved for cuts of meat with lots of fat and/or connective tissue. If you put a pork sirloin roast in your cooker for 8 hours on low, ...


14

There used to be a good reason to add the jelly to the meat pie: food safety. In the time before refrigerators, it was hard to keep meat without some spoilage. But a slaughtered fully grown pig meant some hundred kilos of meat, and it wasn't eaten on a single day. Most of the bacteria which spoil meat need oxygen to proliferate. So once you pack the meat ...


14

Whether or not it's a good idea is subjective, but the Chinese seem to break that rule a lot! For example, Northeastern Chinese sweet and sour pork (guō bāo ròu) is characterized by an intense ginger flavor. The Sichuan classic twice cooked pork (huí guō ròu) calls for boiling the pork with ginger. A common condiment for beef dishes/sauces is black bean ...


13

Ground pork is simply that, pork. Pork sausage is ground pork that has been seasoned. You can substitute, but you'll have to bring your own seasoning.


13

They say to cook until 190F because that's the temperature at which the stuff that actually makes your slow-roasted pork moist, the collagen, fat, etc. is breaking down and coating the meat. Less than that and you'll have all those bits still intact in your shoulder, which you don't want. ATK explains this in their footnote on the recipe: LOW OVEN ...


13

The Hong Kong Centre for Food Safety offers the following information and advice: Use of Hydrogen Peroxide in Food Processing Because of its strong oxidising property, hydrogen peroxide is used as a bleaching agent in some foods such as wheat flour, edible oil, egg white etc. in countries like the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It ...


12

My first instinct would be to use it next time I made okra or collard greens. I think it would be very interesting to use to cook down beans, similar to pork and beans. Perhaps you could turn it into a savory pasta dish, I'm thinking in an Asian style. You can freeze it in ice cube trays (to portion easier later) until you think of something if you ...


11

Funnily enough I made some of these just a week ago. They're not at all difficult to make and you can use any rind, which your butcher should be able to supply. Depending on your health considerations, you can oven cook them or you can part oven cook part fry. Oven cook method: Cut the rinds into 4 by 4cm pieces Place in a pan of boiling water for 10 ...


11

I recommend (and use) a utility knife. Not only are they fairly tough and sharp, you can adjust the blade to the depth you need (you don't want to cut too deep). And the blades are cheap to replace... As others have noted in the comments, be careful with this as you would with any knife: the blades may be small, but they're quite sharp.


10

Whenever I see never I feel uneasy and want to try it anyway :) Beef + garlic works very well. It's often used in middle eastern and Japanese quisine for example. Pork and ginger is a common combination in Chinese cooking.


10

A Southerner will probably tell you that there is no type of BBQ sauce to go with this type of pulled pork because it's not actually real pulled pork... or real BBQ. Authentic pulled pork is smoked, and that comes with a completely different set of pairings. This is technically just braised, shredded pork. Which is not meant as a criticism, mind you - I ...


9

I'm confused. You don't want fake smoke but you don't want to use wood? Are you asking for a synthetic substance you can burn that will not be worse for the environment than burning wood? First of all- burning wood is not bad for the environment- that carbon has not been sequestered and so it would be released into the atmosphere anyway when the wood ...


9

You can have some good yakibuta ramen, mixing it with dashi (you can use fish stock in substitution). I followed this recipe: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wa0umYJVGg


9

Bromelain, at least, won't be a problem, for two reasons. First, although bromelain exists in all parts of the plant, the enzyme exists in larger quantities in the stem. This, plus the fact that the stems are left over after harvest, are why the enzyme is typically extracted from the stem for meat tenderizers. Second, bromelain is heat labile, which means ...


9

There's really no such thing as 'sealing in juices' when it comes to meat. Skin-on chicken breast stays relatively moist because of the fat in the skin; because the skin is on top, it pretty much self-bastes. Broiling just crisps the skin afterwards and will do nothing moisture-wise. With pork chops, however, the fat is around the side and so will drip off ...


9

If you have a blow torch or a brûlée torch, just burn the hairs off. If this is not an option, I've heard that you can use a normal safety razor. In this case I would definitely choose a razor without a lubricating strip along the top.


9

The bone structure is an excellent clue -- each of these three cuts have completely different bones -- and you should be able to learn to distinguish the muscle structures easily as well. (There's almost certainly a price difference, too -- I'd expect a shoulder steak to be the cheapest, followed by leg, then loin and rib.) I've made some quick structural ...


8

The heat should be applied at the end, if you covered the crackling with tinfoil and slow cook it will soften (not crispen!) due to the steam and the trapped fat.


7

The only thing that comes to mind is meat quality...especially since this has happened when you weren't brining. Even though you used it quickly after getting it, what was the age when you purchased it? Did it feel sticky or have any sort of sour smell when you opened it? Crowding the meat in the pan would just cause it to steam and not brown, it ...


7

Pork is the word ascribed to the pig animal as a food product. We don't eat "pig" rather we eat "pork." Sausage is ground meat mixed with herbs and spices in some manner of form. Sausage can be made from any meat, it isn't limited to pork.


7

A couple of suggestions to help maintain constant heat. Time it such that you are only adding a little fuel at any one time. Adding half new fuel will cool down considerably as it has to catch, burn, etc. Adding 10% fresh at one time is much better, for example. Conversely, if you're lookin' you ain't cookin'. Open as little as possible. Remember there ...


7

i made a smoked salmon recently that used tea leaves (from tea bags, specifically chai and a black tea with citrus), and it was very subtle and awesome. highly recommended. i used, i believe, 3 tea bags total, plus 2T of brown sugar and 2T of white rice in a lightly folded foil packet.


7

I doubt that it was some allergy if two unrelated people experienced a problem. Especially if they don't have a history. Allergies aren't contagious, after all. If you're right and the meat was handled properly and wasn't excessively fatty (which can cause some people upset), I think I'd look to some other component of the meal. Surely pork wasn't the only ...


7

Liver (like any offal) needs to be as fresh as possible. Liver naturally has a dense texture, so over-cooking it results in the dry shoe leather effect that causes most people to hate it. Soaking it in milk is a common technique, but I grew up with venison liver cooked quickly in a pan with spice mixes (usually a slightly spicy "cajun" or lemon-pepper). ...


7

The jelly in British pork pies is added deliberately, after the rest of the pie is cooked, to help keep the meat moist. In good pies it is usually either ham or chicken stock which jellifies as it cools. It is entirely possible to make a pork pie and omit this step at the end, but the pie then needs to be eaten sooner before it dries out.


7

I'd suggest skinless bone-in chicken thighs, as they have plenty of fat and collagen to keep them moist and tasty. I've cooked them in French-style wine-based stews, not to mention cacciatorre, for 2-3 hours before now and they just fall off the bone. It is virtually impossible to overcook them, unless you boil them mercilessly for hours. Just get a nice ...


7

Don't worry about the pork contaminating the chicken, but rather vice versa. A good rule of thumb with chicken is to treat it as a biohazardius contaminant. Because it is. Salmonella is present IN chicken meat, unlike other meats where you will only find microbes on the surface. Your marinade doesn't seem particularly inhospitable to pathogen growth, so ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible