Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

27

It's a double boiler. You use it when you need to use 'soft' heat. If you need to melt chocolate, or if you are making a hollandaise, or something that can easily scorch using direct heat, you use this pot. It has a much more forgiving heat, the heat is generated from steam from the water that boils in the bottom pot.


20

If a magnet sticks to it, it's ferrous. I'd like to give a more elaborate answer, but there isn't anything more to it.


18

I can answer you with first hand experience and a picture. Your lovely dark gray finish will become light gray, streaked, and hideous. I'll never buy this style of pot again, it is just too useful to be able to dishwash them sometimes.


15

"Double boiler" or "bain Marie". Put simmering water (and keep it at a simmer) in the lower pot (not touching the bottom of the top pot) and then put the top pot it. The idea that the constant temperature of the simmering steam is provide an even, predictable, well manageable temperature - 100 C. Its great for tempering chocolate (although be careful of ...


12

my 'nuclear option' for cast iron skillets is to put them in a basin of lye solution, and let the pan sit for a week or a month (depending on how fresh and how concentrated the lye solution is.) We keep a plastic basin out back for this. lye is bad stuff, so if you have kids or pets, do please be careful. The lye, however, will take off anything organic, ...


10

I thought that as it was cast iron you could just put the whole thing in a big fire and it would burn off whatever was burnt on and then you could scrub off the ashes, which should be fairly easy to do once the are realy just char.. The second comment here seems to think you can do this as well. You might also be able to do this in a couple of other ...


10

Turn the temperature down - Once the pot reaches boil, it takes a lot less energy to keep it boiling, turning the temperature down it will keep it from boiling quite so violently. Don't overfill your pot - Makes sure you are using a pot large enough to handle all the water and pasta A teaspoon of oil will also help - This helps keep the water from building ...


10

By quick-prepare ravioli, you mean without sauce, right? It's fine to (and you should) cover the pot to bring the water to a boil. Incidentally, it's best to start with cold water from the tap, hot tap water will be more contaminated. Once the water is boiling, you add the salt, then the pasta. Now, adding the pasta will bring down the temperature of the ...


9

Dishwashing fluid isn't a simple soap; it's much more aggressive. A good portion of it is sodium hydroxide (lye) which will attack the protective layer on aluminum surfaces (aluminum oxide), allowing for significant corrosion to occur. All aluminum will form this oxide layer in air, but it can also be intentionally grown via anodization and colored to form ...


8

Barkeepers Friend is a product that works wonders on steel and aluminum cookware. With a little elbow grease, this stuff removes discoloration very well. If you can't find BKF, Zud is another product that uses Oxalic Acid for it's cleaning power, although it seems to be less potent.


8

The usual reason given is that Aluminum will react with the alkalis in dishwasher detergent and discolour. Automatic dishwasher detergent has a lot of stuff in it.


8

There are two possibilities I can see: The steam can wet the pepper in the mill and cause it to cake in the grinding mechanism There's an over-protective lawyer worried someone will scald themselves and blame the grinder company. Which of the two is your guess. Personally I use my grinder over steaming pots all the time and I've never had any problems, ...


7

If it's a small spot you can rub half a lemon on it till it's gone. If the entire inside has darkened you can fill it with water, add several tablespoons of cream of tartar (2 per quart) and boil it for 10 minutes. You can also buy aluminum cleaner, but the do it yourself is typically cheaper. In case you're wondering why I'm suggesting an acid for ...


6

I had two pans that were in pretty bad shape from an antique store. My "reset" button for them was an overnight camping trip. I stayed in the tent. They stayed in the campfire. I built a large batch of coals and, before I went to bed, I buried the two pans in the fire circle under about 4 inches of coals. In the morning, I pulled them out and scrubbed them ...


6

This is what I do for cooking ONE cup rice: Soak one cup rice in one and a half cup water for 20 minutes. This should be done after rinsing the rice properly since, the water used for soaking is NOT to be thrown away. After 20 minutes put the vessel with the existing water on the gas stove (with a loose lid on) on a high heat. When the water reaches ...


6

Stainless steel pots are pretty much indestructable and it should be safe to cook with. Just give it a good cleaning. Some hardwarevstores (lowes) have a ss cleaner that might get rid of the yellow tinge. Otherwise, it'll look like every other well used ss pot. 18/10 ss is 18% chromium, 10% nickel, and balance in iron and stable to higher temperatures. If ...


6

Some dutch ovens are easier to pour from than others; it depends on the how the edge or lip of the pot is curved. If you have one that is not easy to pour from, minimize the amount of pouring that you do by transferring the content out with a ladle... or since ladling can be slow.... I use a glass measuring cup as a scoop. These tend to pour quite well, ...


5

I've seen a number of varying explanations of this phenomenon, but all agree that it's a normal effect to see on stainless steel cookware and is harmless (assuming you are cleaning your pan well). It is probably some combination of the minerals in your water, high heat, and oil or soap residue. The harsher detergents and sometimes less effective rinse of ...


5

Use a kettle? When boiling water for pasta, I just boil it in the kettle and pour into the pan. Has the benefit I can just start it boiling and forget about it until I need it


5

Syrion has already provided some good advice, but I think I can expand it. Note: I live alone and cook for one. And there are a few pieces I use every time. I have more, but I only use them when the primary tool for a task is busy because I am making an involved recipe consisting of multiple components. Beginning cooks seldom make such recipes. So here the ...


5

There are no health safety risks with storing food in a stainless steel, or most other cooking pot metals for that mater The pot should be fine, but there is always a risk with metal in a freezer in that bare skin contact may freeze to it. Also other products in freezer bags may even freeze to it In general it's easier not to use metal containers in the ...


5

If the grinder has a steel mechanism, rust could be the concern.


5

You are going to have trouble scaling that recipe up to that size, due to the limited heat output of a home type burner element or electrical element. They can only have sufficient power to brown so many hash browns, or cook so many eggs at once. Furthermore, most home cooks don't have a pan with sufficient surface area to manage that quantity of ...


4

Use a small kitchen timer. Set it for the time takes your pot of water to boil, and put it in your pocket or on lanyard. Then "errand away" until it beeps Nice timers at http://www.dealextreme.com/products.dx/category.1013~search.timer from credit card to apple sized This works for anything of course, not just boiling water. You can bake cookies, and still ...


4

Like all aluminium they will discolour in the dishwasher, but will still be safe to use. One site I saw stated that the discolouration can be avoided by removing before the rinse cycle, which suggests to me it's the softeners rather than the detergent that does the damage. It's worth noting that very acidic foods or prolonged cooking can also stain ...


4

Scrub the heck out of it with Kosher salt and the tiniest amount of water, then start all over again seasoning it. A fair amount of work, but well worth it to save a good skillet.


4

i STRONGLY recommend against it. i can speak from experience that the sudden change in temperature can cause glass baking dishes (particularly when they go from as high of a heat required by no-knead bread to a cool room temp) to shatter and explode! i had a pyrex dish go supernova on me once, sending hot flying glass shards all over the kitchen. how i ...


4

The double boiler maintains a steady, even temperature due to being heated by the surrounding liquid. Basicallly, (assuming the two pots don't touch) the heat in the internal pot will never exceed the boiling point of the water surronding it. Further, the liquid surrounding the internal pot has an insulating effect that makes temperature changes more ...


4

Use of a double boiler limits the maximum temperature the food being cooked can reach. The water in the lower part of the double boiler can only reach 100*C (212*F) before it boils. The food being cooked, therefore, can only reach a maximum temperature of 100*C (212*F). It can't go over that until all the water in the lower pot has boiled off.


4

Unlined copper is sometimes used for serious sugar work, but it is very expensive and requires maintenance. For general home use where you want to get more than one use from the pan, a good multi-ply stainless pan is probably the best choice in terms of utility and easy of maintenance. You do not want ceramic coatings which can craze at high temperatures, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible