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35

Chicken juices contain a soupy mix of proteins including haemoglobin (which gives blood its red colour when mixed with oxygen), and some myoglobin (which gives red meat its red colour when mixed with oxygen). Up to about 140F, they are unchanged, but heat them to between 140F and 160F and they lose their ability to bind oxygen and so their colours change. So ...


11

Chicken is cooked when it reaches the temperature necessary to denature (break down) most proteins, which kills any salmonella or other disease-causing agents and changes the texture of the meat. The juices that come out of meat as it cooks should be fat or water, both of which are colorless, but they could pick up color from the materials they pass ...


6

Rare duck meat is safe to eat because it does NOT contain the same risk of Salmonella as does chicken meat. Primarily because ducks, as mentioned above, have not traditionally been raised in the same squalid conditions as "factory raised" chickens - salmonella is a disease that is primarily transmitted through dirt/dirty unclean conditions. Now, on the ...


5

Three potential methods or changes you can try: soak the quail in brine for 2-3 hours before searing. You can do this in a large zip-lock sack or in a covered bowl. Make sure to store the quail/brine combo in your refrigerator during the soaking. Let quail reach room temperature before cooking. Pan-searing the quail might dry out the smaller pieces, i.e. ...


4

The above methods will work, but are slightly flawed. You can sous vide a whole quail, but it is inherently wrong to do so. The white (breast) meat is inherently more tender and requires less heat than the tougher legs and wings. Separating the breasts and wings/legs into two sous vide bags works the best. I like to cook the breasts at 130°F (55°C) (hold ...


4

I am not very good at interpreting written instructions into something visual... so in case there's anyone else out there like me, here's a video: http://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/how-to-truss-a-turkey/27751.html This video is Alton Brown's method, as shown on the Food Network. It's a method that has worked fine for me.


3

Thomas Keller's Ad Hoc Cookbook (one of the best cookbooks I've seen) recommends the following: Place the chicken with the legs towards you. Tuck the wing tips under the bird. Cut a piece of chicken twine about 3 feet long and center it under the neck of the breast. Pull the twine up over the breast towards you. Knot the twine, pulling it tight to plump ...


3

This is difficult to describe without pictures or diagrams. However I have found a great video on YouTube courtesy of Gourmet magazine.


2

After you have carved the meat from the bones, use the carcass to make stock. After the carcass has boiled for several hours, the connective tissue dissolves into the liquid, and this makes the meat literally fall off the bone, as there is nothing left to hold it. You can usually get a fair amount of meat off of even the most picked over carcass.


2

They don't give reasons, but USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) do say that duck meat can remain pink, so long as it has reached an internal temperature of 165 F (74 C) throughout. The same temperature requirement is given for chicken, but with the added note that for cosmetic reasons, people usually cook chicken more. They also indicate that ...


2

Quail is small and lean, so fast and hot is the way to go. 200C/400F in the oven for about 20 minutes is about right, but trying to cook meat properly by time and temperature is a mug's game. Get an instant read digital thermometer from Amazon and get it right first time, every time. You are probably looking at an internal temperature of 70-75C for quail, ...


2

Try a 'Beer Can Chicken' stand. Use an empty (or not) beer (or soda) can to hold your basting liquid and properly place the chicken on the holder (as pictured) and put that on the grill. As the chicken cooks your basting liquid will steam your chicken to a wonderful effect. IF you keep your lid down the steam will have the effect of continuously basting ...


2

Are you looking to do this for industrial purposes? Or are you just doing this at home? Also, what is your major concern - putrid water getting into the lungs and growing from there? The water should be hot enough to kill most bacteria at boiling after a relatively short exposure (anything from defecation or exposed on the feathers). As for internal ...


2

No. Cooked eggs and poultry should be stored in the refrigerator within two hours of cooking.


1

I'm sorry, but the juices from chicken contain no blood or hemoglobin. They contain myoglobin which is only found in muscles. This article explains this as well as some safety issues. http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/meat_temperature_guide.html


1

What if you overcook it and there are no juices? You'd have to leave it in the oven until it caught fire. While this is, indeed, how my grandmother cooked poultry, I prefer a thermometer if anyone but me is eating it. (If it's just me, I actually test for doneness by pushing on the breast with my fingers. Don't recommend that method though...I cook a lot of ...


1

I like this one: http://ruhlman.com/2010/07/how-to-truss-a-chicken.html It's simple... and entertaining.


1

Another chicken cutting video; this one is in raw form: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iODAToI6_-o There are 3 ways to use almost all the chicken meat. Serve the chicken pieces with bones and make it taste so good that people will strip every little piece off themselves. Advantage: makes you popular, doesn't require much work, Disadvantage: no second ...



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