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79

Even with a whole bulb, break it into cloves. Put clove(s) on a cutting board. I usually cut off the root end of each clove. Lay a large chef's flat on the clove, then smack the knife to crush the clove. This breaks the skin of the clove and makes it much easier to peel.


54

The trick is that you're bruising the clove of garlic a little bit so the paper will release easier -- if you're using a bulb or less, it's not too bad to do the side of the knife press method. ... but if you're cooking up a recipe that calls for a dozen heads, there's an alternate trick: break the head into cloves put the cloves into a sealable ...


35

Well, frying means to cook in oil, so technically you can't. Fat also is delicious, so you'll lose something in the process besides just calories. If you are using teflon, ceramic, or some other non-stick, don't bring the heat up too much. Scrambling your eggs with milk will make them more fluffy, and I bet less likely to stick. Use (sigh) PAM or another ...


33

No peeling is needed. A good wash and proper cooking will handle all of your food safety needs.


31

A lot of bacteria grows in the range of 40-100F (i.e. room temperature). It's definitely not recommended to defrost meat at room temperature. In fact, you are not supposed to leave meat at room temperature for more than an hour. However, defrosting in the refrigerator can take a long time and require you to plan at least one day ahead of time. I'm not so ...


25

Whipped cream was made for centuries before the mixer was invented. :) You can do it with simply a balloon whisk. Things that may help though: Very cold cream (not freezing) Very cold bowl and whisk (put them in the freezer for 20 minutes prior to using) Copper bowl The process is simply to start slow until you see bubbles form, then speed up until you ...


24

Depends on the rice, of course - here are the most common types: White rice: 2:1 Brown rice: 1.5:1 Jasmine rice: 1.1:1 Wild rice: 4:1, but immediately wash with cold water and drain when done.


24

Note that for maximum benefit I am answering the question regarding chicken stock first and at the end have included information on other stocks such as fish and brown chicken and veal stock. Properly made stock is made from bones only. If you cut up your own chickens then save the backs and wing tips in the freezer and use for stock. You might ask at ...


21

One reason is to remove some of the indigestible complex sugars that cause gas. Another reason is that beans are dirty, so you're just cleaning them with the soaking. If the recipe wants the beans to be cooked in the water used for soaking, the washing needs to be done before the soaking. On top of that the soaking can reduce cooking time considerably, ...


20

The best way to open a brown hairy coconut, not a fresh green one (assuming you are right handed, I imagine that sinister people can reverse the instructions, but I've not tried it). First image the coconut is a head, everything is related to this, so the visualization is important. The three holes are the eyes and mouth of the face. They naturally form ...


20

Cut the sprout end off. Place the cut end on the board, slice the onion in half vertically (i.e. place your knife on the root and cut down) If the outer skin layer is nice and thick, pull it off from one corner. Repeat on other half. If the outer skin is papery, pull it and one layer of onion flesh off from one corner. Repeat on other half. If the first ...


19

I find that brushes and even paper towels are too rough on mushrooms. I use cold running water and gentle rubbing by hand.


19

There are a few tools you should have that are out of the ordinary in a typical American kitchen: Sushi rolling mat - It's really the only way to make maki (rolls). Pro tip: when you use it, put it inside of a large zip-loc bag. This helps prevent the rice sticking to the mat. Wooden sushi bowl - This is essential in helping the rice turn out properly. The ...


19

Put the meat in a sealed plastic bag, place in a bowl in the sink, fill with cold tapwater, then set the tap running in a thin stream with the water overflowing the sides of the bowl. The moving water will safely thaw the meat through convection. Make sure you get as much air out of the plastic bag as you can. You might need to put some weight on it in ...


19

One technique, but not the only, is velveting. Here the meat is tenderized in an egg-white/cornstarch mixture for 20+ minutes, then cooked briefly (a minute) in oil or simmering water with a small amount of oil prior to using in stir fries. I've never velveted in straight oil but water/oil definitely gives the chicken that smoothness that Chinese ...


17

You need to strain the stock and cool it until it's 40 degrees F. or below before you refrigerate it. Leaving it to cool overnight on the stove is going to create a bacteria cesspool. The temperature danger zone is between 40 and 140 degrees. This is the range that is prime for the growth of bacteria. Food safety guidelines require that it cool to 70 ...


17

Dump pearl onions (with skin) into boiling water (on high heat) Bring water back to boil After 1-2 mins, take the onions out, and dump them in cold water (or ice bath) After 1-2 mins, take the onions out of cold water Take an onion, hold it between your index finger and thumb, and squeeze. The onion will pop right out of the skin. Repeat this step for each ...


17

Using separate cutting boards is advisable, but separate knives are unnecessary. 90% of my cutting is done with my chef's knife. I don't own two of these, nor would I use a subpar knife for the job. I almost always find it most convenient to start my preparation by cutting the veggies, fruit, etc. first and then finally cutting the meat last. Then you can ...


16

Poached eggs are a good healthy alternative to a fried egg. In my opinion they are nicer than fried eggs but they must be cooked with fresh eggs.


15

For larger white and crimini mushrooms I typically just brush them off lightly with a dry paper towel. Wet towels tend to smear the dust across the mushroom. I dislike mushroom brushes as they just clutter up the drawers and paper towels are always available if needed. Button-size mushrooms tend to be more likely to be dusty and are difficult to hold onto ...


15

There isn't really a simple answer to this question due to the many variables of personal preference, rice type, water hardness, etc. I suggest buying a proper rice cooker: Zojirushi NP-HBC10 5-1/2-Cup Rice Cooker and Warmer with Induction Heating System, Stainless Steel. (I love mine!) The rice cooker has precise instructions and measurements for each ...


15

Making Mozzarella is not fantastically difficult, but certain things during the process are critical, probably the most important is temperature. If it's your first time making cheese, you might find the buying a 'starter kit' the easiest way to get up and running. These will provide you with all the important items you needm such as rennet. If you feel ...


15

Umami comes from a very specific source: Glutamates and glutamic acid. MSG is a glutamate, so it is one of the best ways to add a bit of umami. Meat, Kombu seaweed (used to make Dashi, and hence Dashi), mushrooms, onions, cheeses, soy and other beans, most high-protein foods. Here is a quick list. Most are prepared foods, but it should give you an idea.


14

First, the recommended minimum cooking temperature for pork is 145 so you can cook them a little less than you already are. Also, keep in mind that meat continues to cook after it is removed from the pan/cooking element. The residual heat will produce what is known as "carry over cooking" which can range from 5-15 degrees, depending on the size of the item ...


14

First, remove some, but not all, of the end. Make sure to leave a little of the root intact, as this will make the next steps easier. Peel the onion and discard the peel. Stand your onion on one of the now-flat ends. Chop in half with your chef's knife. Lay a single half on the flat end. Working from root to cut end, make several cuts at dice width ...


14

Soak them for a while in warm water, and you'll be able to use them, yes. However It is equally important to know that you should reserve the liquid for its essential mushroomness, and yet also that said reserved liquid should be run through a coffee filter to remove grit.


14

Simple. The compounds that give mint its minty flavor are alcohol soluble, so with alcohol present you can "extract" them. There are other things use can use, propylene glycol is one. Basically you need a solvent that can also serve as a carrier for the flavor you want. Water doesn't work, most flavors are not water soluble. Many are oil soluble, but using ...


13

The main reason you put boiling water in the teapot before making tea is to heat up the teapot. You dump out the now cooler water and then add your teabags and more boiling water, and the teapot will now be warm and not leech out the temperature from within it. This results in tastier tea, but is totally not necessary if you didn't make enough hot water, or ...



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