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1

Okay. I tried this two different ways. First I tried just combining the ingredients without the simmering and sautéing step. The flavors didn't seem to come together as well and it did take longer for the liquid to absorb into the bulghur. So then I tried just adding the chopped onion without sautéing first but I did simmer the tomato products. This worked ...


0

Depending on the size of the fish there may always be a few that get stuck (in smaller trout the bones are thin and break off easily). However, there is one way I was taught to cook it that is the best I've found and heats up the inside of the fish better making the bones a little easier to work out. After cleaning the fish cover the outside and the inside ...


0

I dice onions using horizontal cuts first, then vertical cuts as @ElendilTheTall states above. However, it does take some practice. If you are a new cook or you haven't had much practice with your knife, you may want to take a look at this clip from RachelRay Bobby Flay is also in the clip and calls it a common sense technique. It appears to work quite ...


0

It really depends on what size of dice you're going for. For a smaller dice, I'd recommend at least one horizontal slice, as it prevents you from ending up with significantly larger sized pieces from the sides of the onion. I tend to do 1 or 2 horizontal slices, and then some vaguely radial slices ... I don't make the follow-up slices completely radial, as ...


1

Yes. The standard method is to make 2 or 3 horizontal cuts (depending on the size of the onion), then 3-5 vertical cuts, then slice to form dice.


0

I found that some of my cucumbers this year were bitter and did some reading up on why: heat and eratic watering . . . But I discovered a way to salvage the bitter cukes: I peel them and then soak them in cold salt water for a half hour - the salt seems to take out the bitterness and still leaves them crunchy for salads or sandwiches . . . Thought someone ...


2

They will not "melt" into the sauce, but I think your desired effect depends on how long they cook in the sauce. I frequently make "pickled" mustard seeds, which result in a softer seed that pops in your mouth, rather than remaining crunchy. A great garnish or condiment. Not crunchy at all. There are two ways to do this: 1. bring to a boil, then strain, ...


1

No, they will not melt or soften. If your recipe doesn't provide any step for smoothing the sauce, then it is probably meant to stay chunky. If you don't like it that way, you have three options to make it smooth: strain it, as you suggested. It will work as long as the sauce is reasonably liquid. The taste will be less strong than intended. puree ...


0

It is very rare that recipes are written with such detail. It is supposed that a cook's technique is sufficient for the recipe he or she attempts, and doesn't need to learn it from a recipe book. After all, a route planning application doesn't tell you to look left and right between crossing a street either. It is preferrable to learn cooking techniques ...


-2

I remember my mother defrosting most meat from the freezer on the counter. She would take it out when she came home from work for lunch, and it would be ready to cook when she got home. We never got sick. But that was almost 50 years ago when bacteria wasn't as prevalent or resistant as it is today. Greed and selfishness in the forms of people not being ...


1

internet recipes are often lacking, because generally all you get is the recipe itself. i've found that the best recipes come from cookbooks, which often have explanations and tips for many of their recipes. of course, buying cookbooks requires an investment that beginning cooks might not be willing to make. but if you identify a well-respected cookbook ...


4

For the beginner wanting explicit instructions, I don't think you can do better than a 14 day free trial of the America's Test Kitchen website. They break everything down to where it's almost foolproof (which can actually be a bit of a negative to highly experienced cooks); it's great if you're stepping outside of your comfort zone. You can learn a LOT from ...



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