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14

For an astringent/bitter twist to the flavour, for a scent, and the visual gloss effect ** Mediterranean people have been doing this for centuries For best effect they are probably using a first cold press oil (Extra-virgin) from young olive trees (less than 50 years old). It is often quite green in colour and has a pungent and astringent odour These are ...


11

First, make sure your grill grates are brushed well to remove debris so that the food has complete contact with the grates. After preheating the grill use a clean old towel to wipe the grates with a light coating of oil. Additionally, a thin coating of oil on your pork chops or other protein item will be beneficial. Once you've placed the meat on the ...


10

We do this regularly with regular dishes and fine china. Neither say "oven safe". My mother has also done it for years. The process is fairly simple: Put our oven on it's coolest setting (about 175°F or 80°C, I think) Wait for it to reach temperature Turn it off Put dishes in and close the oven. We just stack the dishes. As Joe points out, they'll warm ...


9

Place the sugar (or salt) in a bowl or plate large enough to hold the glass (upside down) Rub the rim of the glass with lemon (or lime, or use simple syrup) the rim should be wet and sticky. Roll/Dip the rim of the glass in the bowl full of sugar. In my experience, you need to leave the glass to dry for a few minutes to let the sugar or salt settle and ...


8

There are two traditional way to eat curry. Indians typically eat their curry with a type of bread. Usually Naan or Roti and use piece of the bread as a scoop/spoon of sort. Thai curry will tend to be eaten, as you suggested, over top of rice. Typically it is separated when it is served so the rice does not get soggy while it is waiting to be served. The ...


7

Try to get some verticality in your dish. Everything just laid on a plate is boring. Instead stack your meat on top of your potatoes, stand a large asparagus spear upright, put some onion straws on top of your dish. Anything that gets some differing heights to your dish will make it more visually appealing. Use your colors. Avoid dishes that come out with ...


7

For special guests you can 'segment' citrus, but I've always found it a thankless chore that wastes a lot of fruit, so I don't undertake the process lightly. This process is especially nice if you are using the citrus in something like a dessert or salad where the texture of the tough membrane can throw off the dish. However, as is the case with a citrus ...


6

There are things you can do to tweak the colors, but generally it's easy to move towards brown and dark, and hard to move towards a pure shade and light. You can use food coloring, spices with a lot of color (like turmeric). You can lighten with cornstarch, flour, and dairy. (thanks satanicpuppy) If presentation is important to you, you can buy ingredients ...


6

It's quite common. I had Garlic Prawns (shrimps) in a faily exclusive restaurant in Darling Harbour (Sydney) last weekend, with shells still attached to the tail. From what I can gather it's mostly about aesthetics. I suspect there is some truth in the idea that it gives the impression of more shrimp for your money as well. Some also argue that it adds ...


6

Another few ways I do this, depending on what else is going on: If I have just a couple plates, I may do it in the toaster oven, or even just set them on top of an already hot toaster oven Pour a little boiling water in each bowl, then drain and wipe just before serving. Pour a little cold water in each bowl and microwave for a couple of minutes


6

Try starting with the pasta in cold water. This lets you stir it to wash the starch off the surface of the pasta while it's still completely hard, so you can't possibly damage it. Then it'll stick way less as it cooks, so you shouldn't need to stir nearly so much, and hopefully it's not breaking just from cooking. This works because the starch doesn't ...


6

I've seen it referred to as a tadpole or a comet but I'm not sure if either of those names are widely used. Either way, there's an excellent video on Youtube about how to do them. You want your sauce or puree to have the consistency of mayonnaise for this particular presentation. Just use a dessert spoon to place a circular blob on the plate, clean the back ...


5

I usually don't add anything to the plate that doesn't flow with the food. i.e. i hate it when cooks add one piece of parsley on top of a meal. I love parsley, either give me a plate of it, or don't put it at all. I digress, but here are some of the things I live by: You need to present your plate in the matter, it should be eaten: Appetizers, let's say ...


5

Be sure the grill is very hot. If the meat did not sizzle when you put it on the grill, then the grill was not hot enough. Also, do not move the meat around except for turning it over.


4

It's also a bit of a culture thing. Where I was born shrimp was always served without shells or tails. Whereas in Europe, shrimp is mostly served with tails and shells. At first came as a bit of a shock to me, because it's more work to no perceived benefit. But, after the initial shock, I've come to realize that very likely there is a flavor component that ...


4

You do get some flavor benefits from cooking with the tail on, just like you do by cooking meat on the bone vs. removing the bones. It makes the shrimp more shrimpy which helps the shrimp stand up to rubust flavors like those found in Fra Diavole. As for when its appropriate to serve tails on, I've always used size of the shrimp and final application be the ...


4

You can buy microwave plate warmers - you stack the plates with them layered between and nuke them for a couple of minutes.


4

"Oven safe" refers to using them to cook rather than to whether they can be warmed. Be careful putting cold dishes in a warm oven though. I'd put them in a cold oven and turn the oven on its lowest setting. Watch the temperature using an oven thermometer. When it reaches the desired temperature (125-175F) turn the oven off. Don't trust the oven's thermostat. ...


4

A technique I discovered to keep my potato salad from turning to mush is to add vinegar to the cooking water (I also add some sugar and quite a bit of salt to balance it out). The amount of vinegar really depends on how firm one wants the potatoes to remain. One to two tablespoons of cider vinegar per quart of cooking water is the range I use. You might ...


4

You could use a plastic syringe (without the needle obviously), which can usually be found at cake stores and such. Where I come from there's a chocolate shop that sells plastic syringes filled with chocolate for kids. On the other hand, the extended plunger may take up too much room. In that case, maybe a test-tube sort of thing with a plastic top to ...


4

I've always done a layer of bechamel, pasta, meat, pasta, meat, pasta, meat, pasta, bechamel, cheeses (mozzarella and parmesan, from bottom to top). If you put the cheese in the middle the liquid in it (especially in the mozzarella) won't evaporate and you will have sloppy lasagne. The other factor is the liquidity of your sauce - a thicker, meatier sauce ...


4

The reason is to enhance the presentation. Oil or butter gives a gleam to the dish. As TFD indicates, you can (should) use a quality extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) for added flavor, but the real reason is plate appeal.


4

When I did this as a kid with my mom, we just put food dye (the same we put in the eggs) on the slices of ham. As someone who has tried this though, I have to strongly recommend you don't. While it's easy to get around the fact that the eggs you're about to eat are green, ham that's green just doesn't look right. It was a struggle to eat it even though I ...


4

Not sure if this is what you're looking for, but rather than trying to solve the problem, you can also just accept it. Bring it all to the table, and just make wraps as you eat them. It won't make it less messy, but it won't be much slower than eating pre-made wraps, and you'll be spending that time at the table with people instead of waiting to eat. To ...


3

I know the standard answer is to wipe the grill with oil, but I find it much easier and more consistent to spray the pork chop with cooking spray, e.g., Pam, before putting it on the grill. That way you know you have an even layer of oil and don't have to worry about it burning off the grill.


3

Another fine book is Working the Plate. Custer's book is great, but it is all about styling food for photography, not for eating - a very different thing.


3

There's one word I keep constantly in my mind when presenting a dish. Balance For example: If all the food is in an ungainly heap on one side of the plate - the plate isn't visually balanced A big steak with a tiny amount of sauce - the plate isn't balanced from the POV of the "eating" as there won't be enough sauce for the steak. Too much sauce for the ...


3

Ooh yes, the thick brown ooze on a plate syndrome - been there a few times... :) Well, another possibility is to not try and fix the color directly, but rather use a garnish to bring some other colors in to play. There are a lot of really great dishes that if placed in front of you without garnish would look pretty dismal. Take for example, Chicken ...



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