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9

No, it isn't safe, water bath canning is only safe for high-acid foods as the acid kills botulism. Low-acid food must be processed at 240F, 116C, and that can only be achieved in a pressure canner. When you pressure cook the soup it kills the bacteria, however when you then transfer it to the sterilized jars it could be contaminated on the way, and then ...


7

Tomatoes aren't high acid, so they need the addition of vinegar or lemon juice in order to safely can with a hot water bath. Honestly, I'm not sure why you would want to make tomato sauce from canned tomatoes because for me, the whole point of canning tomatoes is because the tomatoes will otherwise go bad. But anyhow... I recommend finding a tomato sauce ...


7

Without a canner you are limited to canning high-acid foods. Botulism spores don't die at 212F, the boiling point of water. A pressure canner boiling water at 15PSI raises the boiling point to 250F or so which will kill the spores. The bacterium cannot grow in a high acid environment and so high-acid foods such as fruit and pickles do not need to be ...


5

The Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving includes a section that does just what you're asking. It also provides a large collection of excellent recipes and general tips and tricks.


4

National Center for Home Food Preservation The National Center for Home Food Preservation is your source for current research-based recommendations for most methods of home food preservation. The Center was established with funding from the Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (CSREES-USDA) to ...


3

Pressure cookers and pressure canners are the same thing; with the canners being larger, and often having a pressure dial. Both can reach the same pressures and therefore temperatures if designed and manufactured correctly The pressure canners dial gauge is more accurate for adjusting for food types and altitude, as you can get exact numbers not just 10 psi ...


3

Even if there weren't issues of re-contamination (covered well by GdD), when you use your own recipe, its difficult to know the required processing time (it can generally only be determined by careful measurement with special equipment). So you may not have actually sterilized it when pressure cooking. Is freezing an option for you? I suspect the soup would ...


2

Peppers are a low acid food, so under home conditions, pressure canning will be required to do so. See for example: NCFHFP recipe for peppers.


2

Salsa, tomato sauce, and various pickled vegetables are typically all you can do if you want to have a shelf stable product using a boiling water bath. Nowadays, many recipes add extra acid (vinegar or lemon juice typically) to tomato products to make sure that botulism spores can not grow because tomatoes today have been breed to be sweeter than in days ...


2

For low acid foods the high and low settings are a problem. You really need to know what pressures those are. You have to get to 15 PSI which will give you a boiling temperature of about 250F. Anything less and it won't get hot enough to kill botulism spores. For most high acid foods the pressure cooker will be overkill. Most high acid foods such as fruit ...


1

Here are the things I'd have liked to know before I tried hot water canning: It's not as straightforward as it sounds. In addition to a large pot of boiling water and canning jars, you'll need a special rack. You can buy a pot + rack combo, or just a rack that'll fit in a standard stockpot. You'll also need special tongs; as I discovered, you can jury-rig ...


1

I don't have a pressure canner either, so whatever I have that's not safe to can, I freeze in http://www.canningpantry.com/freezer-jars-quart.html . (which I got on sale for less than three bucks for three last month)



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