Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Living organisms, including plants, are very complicated miniature chemistry factories. Even separated, dead body parts still have chemical processes taking place completely independent from any parasitic organisms (bacteria, molds) present. But of course, lots of the processes which take place in the living plant don't take place any longer, and their ...


10

I've never had luck keeping them out of food. Sealed containers work, but cause fruit to ripen and spoil quickly, and they are small enough to get in anything with an opening. However, a simple fruit fly trap can keep them in check: Cut a 2l soda bottle where the top taper ends (above the label). Add a few drops dish soap to a few tbsp of apple juice, beer ...


8

Martha's Vinyard Magazine suggests that the diamater of the stalks is not directly related to their age as one might suspect: Some might assume thinner spears are younger and therefore more tender. The diameter, however, has more to do with the age of the plant itself and the particular asparagus variety. They go on to cite Cook's Illustrated, ...


8

You can look for a CSA in your area, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community-supported_agriculture: CSAs consist of a system of weekly delivery or pick-up of vegetables and fruit in a vegetable box scheme, sometimes including dairy products and meat. You can use http://www.localharvest.org/csa/ to try to find one in your area.


7

Flies can lay eggs and continue to emerge even after the produce that attracted them in the first place is already gone. After getting rid of the produce the next time, wipe the area down with a kitchen cleaning spray and wait to see if more flies appear. If not, then give it a go again and keep an eye on the progression of the produce, refrigerating it if ...


6

That's the same method I would use. If you have a salad spinner you could try giving them a gentle spin in there first. They are sturdy enough (unless they're over-ripe) that they should handle a gentle pass through it.


6

As Doug mentioned in his answer, tomatoes lose flavor if refrigerated. This is because they contain an aromatic compound called cis-3-hexenal which is permanently destroyed if the tomatoes drop below about 50°F. Moisture makes onions rot, and refrigerators are moist places, so onions should generally be stored in a dry place when whole and refrigerated in ...


6

Combination new technology and an excuse to charge more. It seems to be a 'value added' feature driven by new technology in processing harvested onions and the 'convenience' of not having to peel the Onion. According to fruit today this is a growing market. As others have noted sometimes Organic means an excuse to charge more. Peeled onion aids that ...


6

A very fresh, ripe ear of corn will have a moist, green, unblemished husk; when peeled back, its silk will also moist and clinging to the kernels. In the store, you may find that an ear of corn will have a slightly dried out husk, but if it's still green and the kernels look plump when the husk is pulled back, that ear's fine. Ignore any husks that are very ...


5

I've had friends and family go in on "buying a cow" from a farm. You order a whole cow from them, they will get it butchered and you get all the various cuts from it, ground beef, etc. You can do it yourself and fill up a big chest freezer and thaw as you go. If you have other people in your area interested, you could always buy together, divide up the ...


5

I'm going to go out on a limb here and say no. I think it's an excuse to increase the price of these "premium" groceries. Similarly, pre-sliced mushrooms and pre-diced celery are available in my local grocery store at a premium price. Added processing adds extra cost of production and therefore price to the consumer. In the case of onions, I think this is ...


4

Well, after reading the answers and comments here, I was anxious to try the fat asparagus next time I saw it in the store. Wouldn't you know it? For the next several months all I found was the normal, skinny stuff. Then lo and behold, yesterday my store had the fat asparagus again. (BTW, a US quarter has a diameter of 24.26 mm, 0.955 in.) I treated it my ...


4

Just to clarify a couple of things that others have said - The skin of any vegetable or fruit has natural defences against microorganisms, particularly moulds - if you wash your food the minute you get it home, you reduce its keeping qualities. Wash things as needed, immediately before using or eating them, and they will keep longer than if you wash them in ...


4

I don't think there's a good reason for it. It might make the onions look prettier to some people, and look convenient (pre-peeled!), but it's not like that saves you any significant amount of time, and it leaves them vulnerable to damage and drying out faster.


3

Ummm, this isn't a specific condition...cellulose is indigestible by humans. It is the chief component of what we call "dietary fiber" or my Grandma called "roughage". This question is really asking how to remove the fiber from fresh fruits and vegetables - puree and straining, juicing etc. would all do the trick.


3

Freezing fresh foods high in water content will rupture cell walls (cellulose strands) similar to cooking. I think the effect on cellulose in cooking is more mechanical in nature (water expanding causing cell wall rupturing) since based on what I could find here the heat involved in cooking isn't enough to actually breakdown the cellulose. Freezing will ...


3

I have always been led to believe that tomatoes, at least, will lose their sweetness if refrigerated.


3

Similar to @Nick's CSA suggestion, I've got friends who formed a (sort of) food conglomerate. It needs to be a decent size (4 - 8 families). Once a week, one family goes to the wholesale markets and buys the fruit & veg for all families. Its one of those things where it is financially cheaper, but time and resource expensive. (8 families of fruit ...


3

Just taking the "produce" part of your question, what about growing your own? Even if you don't have a lot of garden most sources of advice for novice gardeners will talk about how to make the most of even limited space. Foodies & cooks will want to focus on: a) produce which tastes substantially better homegrown e.g.: tomatoes (especially) ...


2

Really, a Farmer's Market is your best choice. You need to start going there more than "occasionally" :) You have full control on what you are getting (unlike a CSA), you can taste the same produce (e.g. a Peach) sold by different vendors and decide who has the best tasting one, etc. etc. @hobodave, your profile says "Chicago, IL" -- here is a website I ...


2

Sometimes we see peeled onions at our local farmer markets. I have asked several vendors about this and most said it is a result of trying to make sure every particle of soil is washed from the onion. Many of them use vegetable scrub brushes and those automatically rub away the skins during the scrubbing process. One vendor said some people grow in more ...


1

According to Cargo Handbook (emphasis added): Broccoli is not sensitive to chilling temperatures and should be stored as cold as possible without freezing. When freezing injured, thawed buds will be very dark and translucent, and can later turn brown or may serve as sites for development of bacterial decay. Note that they are describing how to store ...


1

I think it depends on the flavors you want to get from the asparagus: If you're looking for roasted, char-y flavors, it's pencil-thin all the way. Thick ones wouldn't be cooked through in the time it takes for the surface to be nicely charred. If you're looking for more vegetal flavors, thick ones work well, because you can boil or steam them without ...


1

It totally depends what you are doing with it. My use cases for different thicknesses: Thin - steam, boil or fry and serve whole as-is. Medium - Chop into chunks, and stir fry Thick - Soups, purees etc.


1

Mesh cover. http://www.calibex.com/food-mesh-cover/zzcalibex1zB1z0--search-html?nxtg=23f30a1c0520-A5A11C9A30B6FFB3 http://www.thekitchenstore.com/030734063118.html http://www.amazon.com/Handy-Gourmet-Set-Food-Covers/dp/B000EYFV4M/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1280514882&sr=1-7


1

Place the produce on the counter-top or on a plate, and then, use a upside-down "mesh-type" colander as a lid to keep the produce covered. Flies wont be able to get in, but there will be enough ventilation. Depending on the produce, you can obviously also store it in the fridge (not tomatoes).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible