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17

A non-exhaustive list of ways to get your bread to rise when it's cold includes: Just let it rise slowly over a long period of time, which does give you good flavour but requires serious patience Put it in the airing cupboard, assuming Australian houses have such things, but in the winter the hot water tank will keep it nice and warm If it's still in the ...


10

The goal is to keep the surface of the bread from drying out. A wet towel works fine but plastic wrap is cheaper and easier than constantly cleaning wet towels. I have used both methods and haven't noticed a difference in the bread produced. In very dry climates, when I made bread with multiple rises I sometimes had to redampen the towel which was an added ...


7

If you are talking about resting, that is for a short period, typically 10-15 minutes, covered with a damp cloth. When raising however, which takes considerably longer, what I do is set my oven at around 90 - 100 F or 30 - 40 C and put the dough in a lightly oiled bowl covered with a damp cloth. Have, with other ovens, turned the heat on briefly, ...


6

A stiff brush and a set out in bright sun is about all I've felt the need to do with mine. Normally I'll just tap out any extra flour. If I've got a dough that sticks (like last night when I didn't flour enough), then I just take a stiff brush and get all the bits off. If they do get a bit wet, dry them with a towel and then in a warm oven. If I think ...


6

Put a serving plate over the bowl. Normal way up so it doesn't slide off and doesn't need washing. Easy! A small amount of surface drying is not going to ruin a bread dough. Think of the millions of bread making machines out there, no plastic wrap required with them, just a reasonably fitting lid that stops air drafts, hence why the towel method worked fine ...


6

Let me suggest a totally different approach: Why not working with the cool conditions instead of against? You could let the dough proof for a long time, e.g. over night in the fridge. This allows for a lot less yeast and hence a less yeasty taste, which is usually desired. Also, more complex flavors develop during long proofing times. (There is a reason ...


5

My mother used to put the dough in a steel bowl, cover with a plastic bag, and then wrap an electric blanket around the whole thing. Warning: Cats love to sit on top of this soft, warm, aromatic goodness.


5

I do something very similar to Shawn's solution. I put a large glass of water in the microwave to heat it up. Once that is done I put my dough right in next to it. If it needs a long rise, I will go back in an hour or two, pull out the dough and reheat the water for a minute or two. Then I can put the dough back in again. Careful though, a since the ...


5

The bakers couche is not just floured fabric, it is usually a hard wearing canvas It is used to allow the dough to breath, and hold it's shape while your actual bread moulds are being used in the oven. The all over air gap allow the crust to dry slightly. A dry crust makes it easier to handle and bakes slightly more crispy The flour is there to stop the ...


5

In both cases, you don't add the recipe's amount of water to the proofed yeast. If your recipe says e.g. 500 g flour, 300 g water and 10 g fresh yeast, you measure these 300 ml water, then pour some of the 300 ml over 10 g of pressed yeast to proof it, adding a teaspoon of sugar if you want it quicker. After that, you mix flour, proofed yeast and the ...


5

In the winter, I usually get fine results proofing in a bowl with a second bowl inverted on top of it, and then putting the whole thing in the oven, turned off, and just the light on. The light bulb usually produces enough heat to keep the inside of my oven at about 90˚F (32˚C?), and that gives me a good rise.


5

50C (122F) would be a very high proofing temperature. The thermal death point of yeast is 55C, and you'll definitely hit a point of diminishing returns if you get too hot (most likely, you will have really rapid proofing on the outside of the loaf and an underproofed "core"). I would recommend setting your oven to the lowest temperature, and then once it ...


5

What you are looking at here is an old, almost forgotten method of proofing yeast dough for cold conditions. I have an old cook book1 from ca. 1930, when rooms could be cold in winter. I'd say it's "granny's version of proofing in the fridge". My book says to leave out about 1/4 of the flour, all sugar and, if used, the spices. It does not, however, say to ...


5

I can honestly say I've done this on many occasions. Especially for pizza dough, I defrost in the fridge for 24 hours in a cling filmed bowl which allows it to prove slowly through the day. Never once had an issue with it.


4

I work with quite wet doughs and bake in a moist environment, but first rise - in a large Tupperware container, lid on but ajar at a corner to let gases escape. second rise - simply dusted with flour. No noticeable skinning at all or loss of oven spring.


4

Run your dishwasher for a few minutes, wait to let the water finish dripping, cover the bowl of dough with plastic wrap and set inside--top rack seems to work the best for me.


3

I just fill the sink with some hot water and slap it in there, covered by a clean towel. Works like a charm!


2

I place mine in an oiled bowl, covered with a damp tea-towel on top of the heating boiler. There's usually enough residual heat coming out of it to make it the warmest place in the house once the heating goes off.


2

You may want to play with the water temperature. In his book Bread, page 383, Jeffrey Hamelman provides a formula to calculate the right temperature of the water before mixing it with the rest of the ingredients. Also, it's mentioned that one of the benefits of the folding technique (just degas and knead for a few seconds every 30-50min 2-3 times) is that ...


2

I keep mine in the freezer when not in use. This would eliminate the concern about bacteria and keeps it dry and handy for use. When you take it out, give it a tap over the sink and most old flour bits fall off as they have been frozen.


2

Make sure your proving environment is maintaining temperature. If you are making the dough with blood temperature water then the residual heat in the dough will get the yeast going but when it cools down the yeast may cease to be active. The dough should double in size on the first prove. Also make sure your flour is proper strong flour and that the ...


2

Proof the yeast in the water you mention in the last sentence.


1

Leaving the loaf seam side up makes it easier for armatures like me, to roll the dough onto a baking stone or floured peel and reduce the chance of deflating your loaf. Also, sometimes the dough can bulge/blow out during baking. Baking the loaf with the seam side down helps support the structure of the bread while slashing the top gives the loaf room to ...


1

Red spots in a starter are generally an indication of inedible mold; this has happened to me several times when a split of sourdough starter went bad. My first thought would be that your yeast is contaminated at the manufacturer.


1

I've been letting my pizza dough rise in reusable plastic containers with plastic lids (I coat the bottom and sides of the containers with a bit of olive oil so that the dough doesn't stick). Seems to work just fine, and it's incredibly easy.


1

Personally, I spray plastic wrap with oil, then use that. Doesn't stick, even with very high hydration doughs, and completely prevents the dough from drying. Another method is to use a food-grade plastic bag. Tie it shut inflated with air (so it isn't touching the dough). The humidity in the bag will stay high enough to prevent drying, and since the dough ...


1

A good alternative to either a towel (which you have to wash and is prone to sticking) or plastic wrap (which ain't cheap or good for the environment) is a clear plastic shower cap. It does the same job as plastic wrap, but is reusable. The elasticated edge stretches around even big bowls, providing a snug fit.


1

I live in the Blue Mountains and it is impossible to get bread to rise in my kitchen at only 2 to 5 degrees above outside temperature. I mix and knead the bread in a bread oven machine (tried kneading and am hopeless at it). After one knead take out and form the loaf and place in the convection oven preheated at 40 deg C for 30 to 40 minutes. When time is up ...


1

The best seems to be a 1:1 ratio of normal wheat-based flour and rice flour - others agree. First the wheat flour sticks to the dough and creates a nice smooth surface. Then the rice flour (which doesn't adsorb very quickly) creates small 'rollers' that keep the dough from dragging, like ball bearings. This is similar to semonlina or cornmeal for working ...



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