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8

I don't know why this pudding is especially "easy" -- it's similar to other pudding I've made. Perhaps I've always taken the easy road... Salt is a flavor enhancer that makes nearly everything taste better (e.g., enhance sweetness, reduce perception of bitterness. There are many more links on that topic; that was the first reasonable one I saw.) I don't ...


5

Do you have the ingredients necessary to make more? You could make a second batch, without adding sugar, and combine them.


4

This will only thicken by reduction if you leave it on for a really long time. At least 8 hours of simmering, but better to use more than 16, and then you'll get a flavored kaymak. The way it thickened is much more likely to have been raspberry pectin. Many berries have sufficient pectin to thicken when they happen to be used within the optimal sugar and ...


4

I have used orange as an excellent flavor pairing with pistachio in cakes, biscottis, panna-cottas, custards, etc. I always add the zest of orange and a few drops of orange essence. I've also tried cardamom and saffron with pistachios specially in Indian desserts and it is a very popular pairing in India. Just use a few strands of saffron and powdered ...


4

Instant pudding contains a significant amount of cornstarch. It also contains less significant amounts of disodium phosphate and tetrasodium phosphate. All three of these ingredients will have an effect on cake. Starch absorbs water and gels during baking. This interferes with gluten formation to some degree. If you break down the starch in flour, which ...


4

Agar is not a good choice for pudding because it makes a brittle gel and it won't melt in your mouth at body temperature. What you want for pudding is a starch based thickener. What we call pudding in the US at least is typically thickened with cornstarch. Modified starches like Ultra-Tex 3 can also work well. Are you thinking of something more along the ...


4

There are historic recipes for blancmange which are almost fat-free, being prepared with almond milk. Nowadays, most recipes use milk which has been used to soak almonds, but there are ways to prepare a "milk" from almonds in similar ways to that used to make soya milk. I went to the effort of doing it once - it was very tedious. I did that to make a low ...


4

Slice bean in half. Use knife blade to scrape seeds out of bean. Scrape seeds from blade into milk as you are heating. Added bonus: toss scraped vanilla pods into a bowl of sugar to create vanilla sugar. Best flavor release of vanilla into a fat-based mixture is achieved during heating.


4

You are probably stirring the pudding too much. Cornstarch starts thickening at about 205°F/95°C. Once the pudding has got to that point and has thickened, stop stirring, otherwise you will interfere with the starch formation that causes the thickening. Using electric beaters probably means you are missing the point when the pudding has thickened and quickly ...


3

The Industrial Product By way of example, this is the list of ingredients from Jello Vanilla Instant Pudding and Pie Filling mix (a very common brand in the US): Sugar Modified Cornstarch contains less than 2% of Natural and Artificial Flavor Salt Disodium Phosphate Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate (for Thickening) Mono- and Diglycerides (prevent Foaming) ...


3

A very common type of pudding is a pudding made from liquid thickened with starch. It is usually made with milk, but you can use other liquids as you see fit. Fruit juice will probably work best. For starch, use plain potato, corn or wheat starch. The "absolutely no fat" condition is very detrimental to the taste. A trick to make it taste richer would be to ...


2

I once ran into the same problem. I ended up making frozen pudding pops out of them. Boy were they a hit. I just put the pudding in several ice cube trays and a few wax coated paper cups. Pop them into the freezer. Insert plastic spoons or popsicle sticks when it gets frozen enough to hold the spoon or stick. . Serve with a smile, you are about to ...


2

In Kerala style cuisine (which is what I'm most familiar with as an eater, not a cook) the rice is a short, white variety that is fried in ghee first. It's very similar to the short grain rice used in Japanese cooking. I have no idea how this would be packaged in the United States, it's just Rice (for the short grain), or long grain/Basmati rice here. I ...


2

I like to put the pudding mix in the bowl first and add the milk a little at a time, stirring or beating well after each addition, until you have smooth emulsion. Once the pudding mixture is smooth, add the rest of the milk and beat with your whisk as usual. Of course an electic mixer will help smooth it out as well.


2

Well, no one else has answered, so I will. I made the pudding again, this time I did the "dump" just as the milk and syrup started climbing the sides of the pan. Apparently the tiny temperature difference between that and "almost boiling over" was the difference. The second pudding was completely smooth. The recipe is great and it works just like ATK ...


2

Compared to just the cake batter (molecularly), the pudding (molecularly) traps water in a way that requires greater heat to release ...meaning greater than the amount of heat required to bake the cake. All of these trapped water molecules add up to equal a generally moister cake, but also a cake that requires refrigeration sooner and/or longer, or requires ...


2

Unless the package instructions are very different, yes that should be fine. A typical pudding mix will consist of starch the main ingredient, required to thicken the liquid (typically milk) sometimes sugar especially for the "instant" types, others let you add sugar separately flavourings sometimes "the real deal" like vanilla, often artificial. ...


2

Strictly from a safety perspective? Absolutely. If these are from the same brand then likely the only difference in their formulation is the flavoring agents used. Most of those will be quite similar, and won't react with each other or anything. I'm also pretty sure that powdered pudding mix is quite safe in general. So long as you follow the ...


2

the thickner can be changed, I personally have trouble working with both flour and cornstarch--found this out when making gravey. Instead we use Guar Gum & Xanthan Gum. My cooking classes suggested using tapioca, pectin, gelatin, or arrowroot. quick search on wiki givea a long list. Tradidionally arrow root is suppose to produce a shiney, smoother ...


2

Yes, it works without presoaking. You have to cook them for quite a long time until they become quickly translucent, the small ones will need about 30 minutes at a moderate boil. It is not optimal, as the outside will become mushier in this long cooking time, but there are people who don't mind the difference.


2

The ratio of egg/cornstarch to milk essentially controls the thickness of your end product more egg and it ends up like a custard, more cornstarch and you end up with a pastry cream. You could swap out egg/cornstarch for gelatin? With just yolk you add a richness to the pudding same with the butter. With the milk you could swap it out for almond milk, ...


2

Puddings, of the type in your recipe, are thickened mostly by starch gelling. The egg yolks and milk provide some thickening as well as the smooth, custardy texture. Both the starch and egg proteins gel before the boiling temperature. Recipes call for a few minutes of boiling for an entirely different and fascinating reason. There is an enzyme in raw egg ...


2

It sounds to me like you are making your pudding almost as thick as it should be. It should be able to stand up a little. In other words, if you spoon some into a desert cup or small bowl, it should make a pile. It shouldn't be solid like ice cream, it should be smooth, but still stay in a pile shape. Do you have custard where you live? It should be ...


1

Sweet dried fruits like raisins, dates, or apricots complement pistachio very well.


1

If you heated the eggs above 160°F/70°C (and boiling is definitely above that), they're cooked, and any harmful bacteria has been killed. Can't say for sure that you did this without knowing the steps you performed. Given, if it doesn't taste good, and it was cheap ingredients... sounds like an argument to discard it anyway. Even if its perfectly safe. ...


1

Sounds more like a custard. Do you remember using any egg yolks? I don't like to use gelatin when I make flan, so I tend to use either half and half or use 1/2 milk and 1/2 heavy whipping cream. I get a gorgeous, silky, creamy texture that way. Found this when I googled the ingredients that you listed. http://www.thebeerista.com/?p=828 Raspberry ...


1

Traditionally, for almost all of my recipes, the vanilla is added as soon as you remove the pot from the heat. You definitely want the heat to meld the vanilla flavor with the fats, but you don't want to cook it. I would highly recommend splitting the bean lengthwise and either adding them that way to allow milk access to the flavorful seeds, or simply add ...


1

Many chefs and home cooks will push a variety of sauces and custards through a strainer or sieve to achieve a smooth consistency. They same technique can be applied to pudding.


1

It could be a bad quality pudding mix, improperly stored pudding mix, or a wrong ratio of mix to milk. In the case of badly dissolving powders, you want to be more careful. You should use the proper amount of liquid - start out with around 1.5 times more liquid than powder by volume, and make a slurry. When the slurry is smooth, mix it under the rest of ...


1

It is difficult to give an authoritative answer because who knows what a "typical" pie might be like. It might be different for every person you talk to. I will therefore answer just for myself. All of the made-from-scratch pudding pies that I have made have been very similar- a lot of sugar and fat and some starch to make the gel. Usually recipes also call ...



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