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0

Normally people use about the same amount of flour and butter, but you can without problem have the half amount in butter, but the puff pastry will be more dry. This would lead to a recipe of approximately: 200g flour 100g butter at room temp 100g cold water some salt


2

Did you chill the puff pastry before putting it in the oven? Most of the recipes say that after rolling it out you should wrap it in plastic wrap and chill it in the refrigerator for 20-30 minutes before baking. Here's a few random recipes from the web that all call for a chill down: finecooking.com bbcgoodfood.com foodnetwork.com


5

There are a few things that may be wrong here: Oven not pre-heated enough: how long you need to preheat depends on the oven, but for 200 degrees C I'd give it 20 minutes. If your oven has not pre-heated enough it will be at too low a temperature the butter and will melt rather than turn to steam, which is what gives you lift Oven at too low a temperature: ...


2

If you use something other than puff pastry it's not a Torte Milanese anymore, and other kinds of pastry will not hold together in the same way puff pastry does. Puff pastry's layers provide a certain amount of strength and will help keep the shape when sliced, other pastries will crumble much more easily. You can use short crust or any other pastry, it ...


1

I think I know exactly what your problem with this pastry has been. You alluded to it here: Would this cheat puff pastry really work? I stressed in my answer to that question that the butter must be kept cold while making the pastry and up to the point that you put it in the oven. I'm nearly certain that keeping your dough cold enough has been your problem. ...


5

Yes, that will work just like traditional methods. That's the real deal, it's not even a cheat, it's just smart. BTW, the last line in your question raised my eyebrows. In puff pastry there is no waiting "for the butter to get softer so that it flattens". The butter is flattened (or sliced) with brute strength while the butter is still ice cold. That's ...


1

The prime culprit for toughness in my pastries is too much gluten development. Usually this occurs for me through one of the following: overhandling or kneading the dough. Technically, every time you rearrange the dough. too much time between mixing and oven. Gluten develops all by itself - albeit very slowly. too high a ratio of gluten to water. This ...


-2

Go to the supermarket and just buy a pack of filo pastry sheets. Filo pastry if applied properly will definitely make it flaky and soft.


1

My approach to pastry (and cooking in general) is "science-y" -- in order to replicate a recipe, I want to understand the techniques being applied and moreover how the techniques produce the intended result. It sounds like you're serious about this, so this is how I'd approach the situation. I hope this is helpful, and not too wordy! Full disclosure: I'm no ...


2

There are two ways that I make puff pastry. The first is Rough Puff Pastry which is a quicker way to make puff pastry and you get about 75% of the rise you get with normal puff pastry. Here is a link for a Rough Puff Pastry that I use. I'd say that the most important tips to take from that recipe is that the butter must be cold when you start and make sure ...



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