Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

I let mine dry after washing, then toss them in oil, sprinkle with salt, and then roast on a sheet pan I also make sure to get in there and stir them a few times during roasting, to be sure that they all get exposed to the heat, and on both sides.


14

The closest in terms of taste an texture would be another winter squash such as butternut, acorn, hubbard, etc. (As has already been mentioned.) However, anything with a similar texture would work. If you don't care so much about the taste, you could substitute a tuber such as potato, turnip, rutabaga, carrot, parsnip, celery root, or parsley root. Sweet ...


9

You may use all sorts of pumpkins and squashes (a Cucurbita moschata or Cucurbita pepo may be called either, depending on variety) to make a pie. The Halloween types may not be the best choice: they tend to be stringy, not very sweet, and sometimes over treated with pesticides. Instead look for the small varieties (around 5 lbs.) called Sugar, Long Pie, or ...


8

You have to get the skin off and the flesh cooked. The easiest way is to cut the gourd into chunks and steam it. When cooled the peel can be easily removed. Roasting takes longer but results in a far more flavorful product. The pumpkin is more concentrated and if it browns it has more depth of flavor as well. I have sometimes peeled the pumpkin with a ...


7

I would suggest cutting the pumpkin into two halves, scooping out the seeds, and putting them (cut face down) into a roasting pan with a cup or so of water. You do not need to get the pumpkin out of its skin at this stage - it's a major hassle. Just cook in the oven at 350F for 90 min. Then remove from the pan. It's now super-easy to scoop the flesh out of ...


7

You might try butternut squash.


7

Describing the only method I know, and hoping that somebody will come up with an improvement, because this one is quite time-consuming. First, clean your pumpkin seeds and toast them. They cling to the hull when they are raw. When toasting, it is preferable to use lowish temperature for a long time, so you can prevent strong taste changes and burning. If I ...


6

Be sure and roast them in a single layer, and keep going until they are golden brown, tossing occasionally. If they are soggy, you probably just aren't cooking them long enough to drive off all of the water.


6

Be sure not to crowd them on the pan when roasting.


6

There are terrific Thai pumpkin curries; the flavor profile would be garlic, ginger, lemongrass, coriander seed, cilantro, chiles, Thai basil. Here is one I did with Delicata squash that would work equally well with pumpkin: http://www.herbivoracious.com/2009/10/red-curry-delicata-squash-and-tofu-recipe.html .


6

Many of the varieties of pumpkin sold in US stores in the fall are decorative -- they're grown for their appearance and size, not for cooking with. Ask for 'sugar pumpkins' or 'pie pumpkins' at your grocery store, farm stand, or farmer's market, and you should be able to find them -- they tend to be smaller, more squat than round (although, some farmers ...


6

Safe? Or good to eat? Pesticides usually don't penetrate thick-skinned produce (oranges, etc), so as long as you're not using the skin, there's not a lot to worry about. They're not the best pumpkins to use for other reasons (linked in comments). In summary, the smaller "sugar" pumpkin is better for cooking, if you have the option.


6

In the accepted answer to this question, it says that you can try wringing the pumpkin purée out in cheese cloth; or in a comment, that you can let it drain in a colander.


6

I found a method here: http://www.heritagefarms.com/recipies/recipie_pages/roasted_pumpkin_seeds.php To hull seeds in quantity, first break them up with a rolling pin, hammer or food chopper, then drop the seeds into a large container filled with water. Stir vigorously to bring all the kernels in contact with the water and to break the surface tension. ...


6

Raw pumpkins are very hard and more or less inedible. They are similar to potatoes: you have to cook them before you can eat them. Most pumpkin varieties are not as stringy as spaghetti squash, at least their edible portion isn't. The fibers in which the seeds hang are not eaten, you eat the hard part (after cooking it to make it soft). It is also possible ...


5

I'll second the suggestion for peeling and roasting - generally what I do is quarter the pumpkin, scoop out the interior (and scrape it a fair bit with a big spoon - the stringy texture of the interior is generally the worst part of homemade pumpkin, IMHO, and you want to get as much of it out as possible), peel the outside, and then dice it into ~1 inch ...


5

I think once the outer skin is compromised, your room temperature storage options go out the window. Your best bet is to puree the pumpkin pieces, and freeze it. Not ideal, I know, but if you don't want the pumpkin to go to waste, that's probably your option.


5

I agree that, in general, other squashes can be substituted for pumpkin. I have tried some different types of squashes but obviously there are many more that I haven't tried. There are definitely differences in flavor- these will obviously change a dish but not ruin it. The biggest differences I have run into are water content and texture. When roasting ...


4

I think you're right that they're similar to a watermelon in that there's truly no definitive way to tell if they're ripe and good to cook with. There are a few signs you can look for though. Like a watermelon, thump it. It should make a hollow sound. Check the skin out. It should be hard like a shell. Press your thumbnail into it; it should resist ...


4

For maximum crispiness, you will want to fry, not bake. I've never tried this with pumpkin but I think it will be an interesting experiment. As far as spices go, I would highly recommend smoked paprika (pimenton de la vera or pimenton dulce). Another option would be some of the flavors from Thai curries, such ground coriander seed, black pepper, and red ...


4

I like a spiced pumpkin risotto. I take a basic butternut squash risotto recipe substitute pumpkin and add ginger. I bake my pumpkin in 1 inch cubes with rosemary, cardamom, salt and pepper. If I am just cooking for my wife and I as opposed to cooking with my kids in mind, I add chiles to the risotto, it cuts some of the sweet out of the pumpkin. edit: You ...


4

Hmm. I would say that pumpkins maybe have a slight bit of acidity, but I would never think of them as distinctly sour. I suppose it could be the variety you are using. Also, taste your stock by itself to make sure it isn't contributing an unwanted sour note. All of that said, it may just be one of those expectation things. We are used to pumpkin in a sweet ...


4

I spent a couple of hours in front of the television splitting dried pumpkin seeds with an exacto knife. Make sure you don't point the business end at yourself or the fingers that are holding the seed. Ended up with about a cup full of seeds. If you have the time that seemed to work the best for getting whole raw seeds which are better for you. I decided ...


4

I just noticed that your recipe uses water. That's an ideal way to get tea flavor into things - you can replace it with concentrated tea. Assuming you use teabags, you should be able to steep two in that 2/3 cup of water. Tea is a fairly subtle flavor, so you may not taste it too much in the bread, but this is easy and doable with what you have! There's also ...


4

According to the National Center for Home Food Preservation (emphasis added): Freezing is the easiest way to preserve pumpkin, and it yields the best quality product. Select full-colored mature pumpkin with fine texture (not stringy or dry). Wash, cut into cooking-size sections and remove seeds. Cook until soft in boiling water, in steam, in a ...


4

Either boiling or roasting would work, but roasting may be less work (since you don't have to peel and dice the squash). Roasting may also give you better flavor. Here is one recipe for homemade pumpkin puree, from Alton Brown, but the basic technique is very simple: Cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds and loose pumpkin... erm... guts Roast ...


3

I would suggest combining @justkt's comment with steaming: that works omnidirectionally, which takes care of @daniel's answer as well. More in particular: make the stew separately but not quite until fork-tender, optionally roast your pumpkin for as long as your oven works, then put your filled pumpkin in a nice big pot with lid on a rack with a bit of ...


3

You could also go another route and make them sweet with cinnamon and sugar (and nutmeg and/or ginger if you like them). Edited to add: cumin is also good with sweet potato fries, so it'd probably be good with pumpkin fries.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible