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12

Quinoa naturally contains a bitter compound on the outside of the seed. Usually you have to rinse the quinoa to remove the bitterness but most commercial quinoa seems to have already been rinsed. So, I no longer rinse my quinoa. If you have time, it's nice to heat a pan and add the quinoa and toast it a little (for a nutty flavor and fluffier texture), ...


10

Rice cookers are quite versatile and cooking Quinoa would not ruin the rice cooker if you do indeed want to experiment. A rice cooker works because there is a springloaded thermal sensor plate at the bottom of where the metal pot sits(only if it is automatic. Some rice cookers have a switch to flip to go into the heating process). This will then start the ...


9

I've cooked white rice, brown rice, wild rice, whole Oat Groats (2 brown rice cycles + a little extra water on cycle two) , rye groats, Khorasan wheat (kamut), barley, Spelt, and numerous other seeds in my fuzzy logic rice cooker, but never Quinoa. It seems to me the white Quinoa seed benefits from a short cook time, and a long post-cooking expansion time. A ...


5

In the pastas that I have made the structure of the noodle is built out of protein- usually entirely from gluten from wheat flour. In fact the base of my pasta is just flour and water (or juice or pureed vegetables, etc.) Egg noodles, obviously get structure from the egg. Quinoa has no gluten and will impart no structure to a typical pasta. You could ...


4

I'm not a chemist but I'm pretty sure it has to do with the things that happen to starches in general. In particular, the chemistry isn't about the wheat gluten, it's about starch. Thus, if you feel your quinoa pasta is coming out too gummy or mushy on the outside, you might try it. (If your pasta is already mushy or gummy, how much worse could it get?) I ...


4

Quinoa is cooked much like rice- in fact it can be cooked nicely in a rice cooker. The 2/1 ratio is correct. As with rice, the goal is to steam the grain. You should be cooking on low heat after it boils and is covered and you shouldn't be frequently opening the pot while it cooks. I haven't had success adding water later in the cooking. It doesn't get a ...


3

You are unable to do anything about it. The bitterness in commercially prepared flour is from the fact that they don't thoroughly rinse the saponin from the outside of the seeds. Once it's milled in, there really isn't anything you can do about it, doubly so when making a bread that is basically flour and water. So you have two ways to fix it. One is grind ...


3

I use it in 3 different ways: "Raw": I put it as a crust for many of my breads, or deep fry coatings. Boiled: I boil it like couscous and enjoy it that way as a rice substitute. Flour substitute: I usually substitute it for flour (max of a 1/2 cup).


2

Adding lemon juice when cooking pasta has the effect of make pasta absorb less water. If pasta seems like glue, lemon juice can help.


2

I generally cover it with water in a saucepan, boil it for around 10 minutes, drain it and then use it in the same way I'd serve rice. I find it tastier than rice and like the texture. I don't usually add anything, but I'm sure you could.


2

According to Bob's Red Mill, which makes the quinoa flour that I use: You can substitute this flour for half of the all-purpose flour in many recipes or completely replace wheat flour in cakes and cookie recipes.


2

I have cooked Quinoa in a rice cooker and it came out fine. The only thing I might add is to stir the contents once or twice while it is cooking. because when did it it must have bubbled up a little because there was some Quinoa stuck to the sides of the rice cooker.


1

Okay. I tried this two different ways. First I tried just combining the ingredients without the simmering and sautéing step. The flavors didn't seem to come together as well and it did take longer for the liquid to absorb into the bulghur. So then I tried just adding the chopped onion without sautéing first but I did simmer the tomato products. This worked ...


1

As you stated above that you have used every possible method, i use simple method for grain sprouting. First i wash grain properly to remove dust and then soak them in normal temperature water for at least time mentioned in recipe.The first step in preparing quinoa is to remove the saponins, a process that requires soaking the grain in water for a few hours, ...


1

If you want to replace 100% of gluten containing flour in a recipe, you will probably need to vary the amounts of the other ingredients, the cooking time and the cooking temperature. It doesn’t behave the same as gluten containing flours in the oven. Every recipe is different, but some very general rules of thumb are (for which there are probably just as ...


1

I have used quinoa flour in various recipe and it would have a similar effect as the brown rice flour, though its taste would differ. I would recommend against substituting it (at least not 1:1) for the tapioca flour as that is likely working as a kind of binding agent to some extent. Experimentation may yield different results based on the ratio, but also ...


1

If the seeds that were used were poorly washed prior to milling, then there is nothing you can do about it. What was the brand? Now there is a chance that the taste you are getting is from the enzymes, which will disappear when you toaste the quinoa prior to using. Try pre-toasting the flour in a pan and let us know i that helps. I would always pre-toast ...


1

There's some good advice here: http://www.savvyvegetarian.com/blog/advice/food-safety-tips-food-spoilage In summary, everything goes bad, quinoa is no exception. To be safe, refrigerate when possible. Leaving food at room temp is asking for trouble. One other thing to note about quinoa - some people are allergic to it! My husband feels super sick after ...


1

Getting the best results often means choosing the right pan. Quinoa to no more than 2inches/5cm depth dry with room to double. Good heavy base that will hold heat, also makes a big difference: can turn off pot for last 2min of cooking (or when water is nearly gone) with a towel under lid. No drips making grain soggy. If you must stir to check whether ...


1

You can do whatever you want :) The flavor of quinoa is significantly different than that of white flour, and the consistency tends to be a bit grittier (although this is probably a function of the milling process). The other thing that quinoa lacks is gluten--the protein that makes bread doughs rubbery and stretchy. Gluten is necessary when making yeast ...



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