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67

In Germany we have an old (joking) saying that roughly translates to "head off, tail off - bunny", so your question is legitimate. But first things first: There is no health risk involved if you ate the latest shipment of "meowling rabbit". (To cat lovers everywhere: This is no endorsement, I have a much loved and pampered cat, too!) Obviouly the most ...


35

In the textbook Text-book of meat hygiene: with special consideration to ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection of food-producing animals (Edelmann & Eichorn, 1908), pages 64-65 concern determining the difference between a cat and rabbit: The following differences in the skeleton are especially to be mentioned: The lateral processes of the lumbar ...


27

The simplest way to tell the difference is to look at the ribs. Cats have one pair of floating ribs, but rabbits have three pairs. The floating ribs are the ones at the bottom (i.e. towards the tail), that are not attached to anything at their outer end. All the other ribs are either attached directly to the breastbone, or to the cartilage that extends from ...


8

The main differences I see in the skeletons of the two animals is that the cat's humerus (large single bone in the front legs) and its radius/ulna (smaller dual bones in the front legs) seem to be very close in length, or the single bone is slightly longer. The same goes for the hind legs, where the femur (single bone) and the tibia/fibula (dual bones) are ...


8

The easy way is to look at skull, paws, and tail - but these are normally removed! Cat have short paws, long tails, and a sleeker skull Hares have very long rear legs, easy to spot Rabbit have curved lower leg bones (tibia and radius?), shaped like this () Cats generally have quite straight lower leg bones, shaped like this V. The are nearly touching ...


5

I'd say 3 to 5 people, depending on the heaviness of the sauce, the meatiness of the rabbit etc.


3

I've never seen ground rabbit, but I've eaten rabbit many times in Spain grilled in the BBQ or in a Paella. Rabbit can compare to chicken. The meat is a bit tougher than chicken but not gamey at all. At least the farm rabbits I ate. So I would say that yes, you should be able to use this ground meat as a substitute of chicken in a sauce and I don't even ...


2

I would say he is referring to farmed rabbit which does have a very mild flavour akin to chicken especially compared to the wild stuff.



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