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25

I use thin chopped bacon slices(uncooked) as a flavoring agent. Also drop 1-2 eggs in there and stir, this adds texture. I normally stir-fry some chopped steak on the side and dump in the ramen afterwards. I don't use the seasoning pack that comes with the ramen. For flavoring, I use ponzu sauce, soy sauce and vinegar mixed with garlic powder. Here's my ...


14

Throw away the flavoring packet After you empty the ramen out, put peanut butter, soy sauce, a bit of chili oil and a bit of water in the pot, and heat and stir it just enough that the peanut butter melts. You could also add some scallions or other veggies at this point (frozen peas are especially good!) Now add the noodles back into the pot and toss enough ...


13

Drop in an egg in the last bit of cooking. The egg will cook quickly, and it's a good way to add some protein. Also try adding in some scallions, random veggies, and maybe some hot sauce if you want to spice it up a bit.


8

A comment on the dropping of egg. Beat the egg in a small bowl. Stir the hot soup in a circular motion to get the soup in the outer portion of the pot moving quickly and steadily. Continue stirring while pouring a small stream of egg into the pot near the edge where the broth is moving most quickly. This the technique for chinese soups with ribbons of ...


6

The Japanese use a stock called Dashi for the base of many soups, sauces and dishes including the famous miso soup. Dashi is made like tea by seeping several different varieties of dried ingredients such as dried bonito flakes, dried baby sardines, dried kelp and dried shitaki mushrooms in varies combinations. What you can do is boil water and use a teabag ...


5

The short answer is yes, they can come in a curly form. There are several types of fresh noodle used in Rāmen, which can be classified mainly according to thickness and shape. Noodles are classified in shape into the straight sutorēto-men (ストレート麺), the curly chijire-men(縮れ面), and the more rare flat hirauchi-men(平打ち麺) . With the exception of the flat type, ...


5

Any vegtable you'd like in soup, just make sure you cook it a little bit before you drop it in the ramen pot, since they'll need a bit more time to cook than the noodles. Carrots and celery fit well with the standard flavors of the ramen.


4

I like to cook shrimp ramen, strain off all of the water, and then add some alfredo sauce.


4

I've done the experiment suggested by derobert: Added hot water to the ramen noodles in my microwaving container Microwaved for 2 minutes (I usually pour off the water and start over after one, but I wanted to give this the best chance that I'd get a result.) Poured the water into a glass container (I used my french press, which looks a bit like a ...


3

Perhaps you could consider straining it twice? Use your strainer the first time to get out the larger particles and then do a second time with the cheesecloth so that it doesn't get clogged as easily. I imagine this wouldn't be any faster, but you'd have to fight with the clogged cheesecloth less.


3

Fine mesh sieve is the usual way, but the way you describe it, yours is not fine enough. Look in professional stores for a "chinois", this is the kind of sieve you need. But yes, it will take a long time. In classic restaurants, the stock will be cleared before going through the chinois. This is done by floating a rack of eggwhite which bounds the stray ...


3

I like to use a lint free surgical towel. It works much better than cheesecloth and is not as slow as a coffee filter.


3

If you want a clear stock, cheesecloth (and a healthy dose of patience) is the way to go. I would speculate that you might get better performance by first getting the big bits out by using a colander, and then go on to the fine-mesh sieve, finishing off with another pass through the sieve lined with cheesecloth. At that point, you can also use a little ...


3

Fat floats, so if you dump the water into a bowl and let it sit for a bit, you can see how much floats to the top. You can then remove the fat in any of the normal ways (this is exactly the process you use to defat a stock or a soup), and measure it. Of course, I quickly looked up the nutrition information on ramen, and it has ~7g fat, ~3g saturated. An egg ...


2

I like boiling the ramen noodles, draining them, then adding to a mixture of browned ground-beef and spicy baked beans. Great warm dish for a cold day. They also taste good with teriyaki sauce, beef or chicken, and 1 or 2 vegetables.


2

As a college student, I would occasionally combine it with a can of chili to improve both. The chili-flavored seasoning packet goes well with it, but most other flavors are a bit off.


2

When boiling the ramen add 1/2 a knorr stock cube. Then fry slices of spicy Italian sausage with some mushrooms, garlic and chilli and add to noodles. A dash of sesame oil is nice too.


2

Add veggies and meat or tofu, black pepper or chili oil, an egg: in short, anything you like or happen to have on hand!


2

I always add grated cheese to the ramen and diced hard-boiled egg. It is so good. And this way you can still prepare the ramen how you would normally prepare it. For instance I add the noodles, powder, and cheese to a bowl. Then cover with boiling water and cover the bowl til done. Then finally add the eggs and mix. So good!


2

You can treat it like Pho, and add other thinly sliced items (bok choy or other cabbage or dark green, onion, mushrooms, meat). or even some thawed previously frozen shrimp (and even sliced hot dogs occassionally). I'll also make a stir-fry, add a bit of water, throw on a brick of ramen, slap a lid on it and then let it steam for three minutes 'til the ...


2

Buy yourself a "Benriner Japanese Mandolin". After cooking ramen, thinly slice some onion on top. The same goes for other vegetables (radishes are particularly good). Also, you can freeze some meat, thinly slice it on the mandolin and add it just prior to serving: paper thin beef will cook almost instantly. I sometimes cook ramen in homemade stock, usually ...


2

I once made an egg-based pasta recipe, meant to be spaghetti, which I didn't allow to dry to rest long enough. Texturally, the result was identical to ramen (even without the kansui, or bicarbonate solution) because the noodles were cooked so moist. The pasta stayed pretty curly after cooking, most likely because it wasn't dried over a rack; it was just ...


1

I put oil in the saucepan and cook the egg first. When the egg is done, add water to the saucepan and then add the ramen and seasoning. Don't wait till the water is boiling before you add the noodle. This will save you time and prevent the egg from being overcooked. Simon


1

I make it all the time with egg. Learned to make it this way while on a tour in Asia. Here is my method: Bring water and flavoring to a boil. Add noodles, bring back to a boil. Crack an egg in a separate bowl, add some water (a couple tablespoons) to it and scramble it with a fork or chopsticks. While stirring the pot slowly add in the egg. Remove from ...


1

I would avoid dumping raw egg into water altogether (unless you're poaching it) and fry the egg separately in a frying pan or wok. Get a thin layer of vegetable oil very hot in the pan, and pour the egg mixture into it. It will immediately puff up. Let it set a little, then start breaking it up with a spatula and stir fry the pieces until they're the ...


1

Nice question; a lot of great recipes in this answer! This sounds a little strange, but I used to: Prepare the ramen like normal Put a colander over a bowl and separate the noodles from the broth Toast two pieces of bread Put the noodles between the two pieces of bread and dip it in the bowl of broth



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