Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

The Japanese use a stock called Dashi for the base of many soups, sauces and dishes including the famous miso soup. Dashi is made like tea by seeping several different varieties of dried ingredients such as dried bonito flakes, dried baby sardines, dried kelp and dried shitaki mushrooms in varies combinations. What you can do is boil water and use a teabag ...


6

I've done the experiment suggested by derobert: Added hot water to the ramen noodles in my microwaving container Microwaved for 2 minutes (I usually pour off the water and start over after one, but I wanted to give this the best chance that I'd get a result.) Poured the water into a glass container (I used my french press, which looks a bit like a ...


5

Fat floats, so if you dump the water into a bowl and let it sit for a bit, you can see how much floats to the top. You can then remove the fat in any of the normal ways (this is exactly the process you use to defat a stock or a soup), and measure it. Of course, I quickly looked up the nutrition information on ramen, and it has ~7g fat, ~3g saturated. An egg ...


5

The short answer is yes, they can come in a curly form. There are several types of fresh noodle used in Rāmen, which can be classified mainly according to thickness and shape. Noodles are classified in shape into the straight sutorēto-men (ストレート麺), the curly chijire-men(縮れ面), and the more rare flat hirauchi-men(平打ち麺) . With the exception of the flat type, ...


3

Perhaps you could consider straining it twice? Use your strainer the first time to get out the larger particles and then do a second time with the cheesecloth so that it doesn't get clogged as easily. I imagine this wouldn't be any faster, but you'd have to fight with the clogged cheesecloth less.


3

Fine mesh sieve is the usual way, but the way you describe it, yours is not fine enough. Look in professional stores for a "chinois", this is the kind of sieve you need. But yes, it will take a long time. In classic restaurants, the stock will be cleared before going through the chinois. This is done by floating a rack of eggwhite which bounds the stray ...


3

I like to use a lint free surgical towel. It works much better than cheesecloth and is not as slow as a coffee filter.


3

If you want a clear stock, cheesecloth (and a healthy dose of patience) is the way to go. I would speculate that you might get better performance by first getting the big bits out by using a colander, and then go on to the fine-mesh sieve, finishing off with another pass through the sieve lined with cheesecloth. At that point, you can also use a little ...


2

I once made an egg-based pasta recipe, meant to be spaghetti, which I didn't allow to dry to rest long enough. Texturally, the result was identical to ramen (even without the kansui, or bicarbonate solution) because the noodles were cooked so moist. The pasta stayed pretty curly after cooking, most likely because it wasn't dried over a rack; it was just ...


1

I put oil in the saucepan and cook the egg first. When the egg is done, add water to the saucepan and then add the ramen and seasoning. Don't wait till the water is boiling before you add the noodle. This will save you time and prevent the egg from being overcooked. Simon


1

I make it all the time with egg. Learned to make it this way while on a tour in Asia. Here is my method: Bring water and flavoring to a boil. Add noodles, bring back to a boil. Crack an egg in a separate bowl, add some water (a couple tablespoons) to it and scramble it with a fork or chopsticks. While stirring the pot slowly add in the egg. Remove from ...


1

I would avoid dumping raw egg into water altogether (unless you're poaching it) and fry the egg separately in a frying pan or wok. Get a thin layer of vegetable oil very hot in the pan, and pour the egg mixture into it. It will immediately puff up. Let it set a little, then start breaking it up with a spatula and stir fry the pieces until they're the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible