Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

There are a couple common ways to deal with seeds in berries: Use a food mill, which uses a rotating blade to crush the berries and force them through small holes. They're designed for this sort of thing - removing seeds or large pieces of pulp. Do what the food mill does, but by hand: push them through a reasonably fine strainer/sieve. Unless they're ...


7

From the comments, Henrik noted that there is a parasite in Sweden (called "Dvärgbandmask" in Swedish) that contaminates wild fruit. This is a type of tapeworm called "Echinococcus" in English. Its eggs can cause a parasitic disease called Echinococcosis or hydatid disease. According to this article, freezing the eggs to very low temperatures and/or ...


6

I'd stew the raspberries down with a little water (and sugar if the raspberries aren't sweet) until they're very soft, then pass the whole thing through a sieve to remove the seeds. You can then either store the result in the fridge, or pour it into an ice cube tray for easy portioning and a nice cold smoothie.


5

Basically, you can refreeze the raspberries. When a fruit or veg. is frozen, the water inside the plant cell expands, and bursts the cell wall, which is why there is so much 'juice' when you thaw. If you refreeze, you can be sure that the raspberries will freeze into a giant block. If you are using them to make a sauce or a jam, this is not significant. ...


4

I’ve made muffins with fresh raspberries. Increase the amount of flour you’re using, to help absorb the extra moisture. (I add somewhere in the range of 20-30g for 12 normal-size muffins.) Cut the berries up into smaller pieces, put the pieces on paper towels, and cover with more paper towels. This soaks up some of the juice, and distributes it better ...


4

Raspberries are going to leak a little and stain the batter of any muffin they are put into. Muffins with whole berries are going to have reduced shelf life due to this. Frozen raspberries would be even more leaky, as the freezing and thawing will soften them. To make a raspberry muffin, you have to accept that raspberry is very moist, so you cannot ...


4

Raspberries seem fairly acidic, and many bacteria don't stand up well to acid. Here's one article that says raspberry juice kills bacteria. If you're worried, then, you might consider pureeing the raspberries in your blender and letting them sit for a minute before adding the yogurt, banana, or whatever else you put in your smoothies.


4

Store them unwashed. Take out any "bad" ones. I've had decent luck adding some paper towels to wick away extra moisture that seems to speed up the spoilage. Martha Stewart suggest going even further and spreading them out on paper towels on a sheet pan. I have no idea who keeps a fridge empty enough that they can store full sheet pans in there, though. I've ...


3

Most fruits, a few days: Use kitchen towel to dry them (don't wash) Line a sheet pan with kitchen towel Spread them so they don't touch (any mold on one berry won't spread) Refrigate Fragile berries: Put the pan in an inflated plastic bag (so the bag doesn't touch the berries) If you see any mold on some berries, you can delay mold formation on ...


3

Raspberries aren't just seeds and juice, though they're certainly not as fleshy as some fruits. The difference between apple puree (apple sauce) and apple juice is much more obvious. In any case, you should be fine forcing them through a sieve as you suggest.


2

Some brands of raspberry yoghurt don't have seeds, and you say you're adding yoghurt anyway, so you could try that.


2

I find that blackberries and blueberries make an excellent addition to a raspberry-based smoothie. I usually use vanilla greek yogurt with frozen rasp/black/blueberries when I make a "purple" smoothie. This can be kind of tart, but the vanilla greek yogurt and vanilla soy milk offset it pretty well. If you're using non-sweetened yogurt and/or ...


2

The easy way: Use raspberry oil (preferably) or a raspberry extract in place of the peppermint oil. The (probably) much better way: Leave out the oil and food coloring and use raspberry puree as you suggested. Strain frozen or fresh raspberries through a fine strainer or cheese cloth. Weigh the resulting juice/puree and then put it on the stove an cook it ...


2

Combine 10oz frozen raspberries, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tsp cornstarch, and 1/2 cup water. Bring to boil, and continue boiling 5 minutes, or until sauce is thick. Strain sauce through a mesh strainer to remove seeds. Then you have hot raspberry puree (which is sweet) -- otherwise, remove the sugar. Source: I made it once using this recipe.


2

Bananas are a good combination with many berries, including raspberry since they don't compete, but add a mild/sweet flavour for contrast. Apples and berries are also a good combination, though for a smoothie, you'd probably want to use (unsweetened) applesauce, rather than raw apple. I've seen commercial drinks that pair raspberry with orange and ...


1

I've had really good results with special "breathable" plastic bags designed to let ethylene gas escape. The ones I'm using now are made by PEAKfresh USA. These work particularly well with strawberries. Apparently some retailers are catching on and prolonging produce shelf-life through ethylene absorption.


1

McGee has an article for conserving fresh berries for some days longer. He talks about molds, not bacteria... Frozen berries should be alright as your country's health regulations will not allow dangerous foods to be imported or produced or sold.


1

White chocolate is also an excellent combo. Also if it's not completely "melted" into the smoothie, but rather hacked into tiny bits (usually by blending smoothies), you'll have a strong raspberry kick at the beginning with a lingering white-chocolate taste creeping in after. Delicious!


1

Peaches are good with raspberry (Peach Melba is a classic example). I imagine that fresh apricots would also work well.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible