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37

I might disagree a little with rumtscho - traditionally cured bacon is one thing, what you get in packets from the supermarket is another. It looks similar and it tastes similar, but commercial products are processed rapidly and not tested for immediate consumption without cooking. Products like Parma ham and Schwartzwaldschinken are proven to be adequately ...


37

It's perfectly safe to cook it, as long as you don't plan to eat it. The exception is if the water was at or below fridge temperature to begin with. When food temperature enters the "danger zone" of 40-140F/4-60C, there's a lag time of 2 hours before bacteria go into exponential replication. Any longer, and the bacteria counts start to increase ...


31

A lot of bacteria grows in the range of 40-100F (i.e. room temperature). It's definitely not recommended to defrost meat at room temperature. In fact, you are not supposed to leave meat at room temperature for more than an hour. However, defrosting in the refrigerator can take a long time and require you to plan at least one day ahead of time. I'm not so ...


29

In such a case, for any food item, ask yourself a question: In a 19th century household, would it have been kept in the cellar, or eaten immediately? For bacon, it is common knowledge (or at least I think everybody knows it) that it was kept in a cellar for long time. So this is definitely not a food which perishes too quickly. You can eat it raw. (In ...


16

It's as safe as any other raw meat consumption. It all comes down to quality beef and best practices when handling. Two rules of thumb: Don't use steak from a supermarket. Use a butcher, preferably one you know and trust. Tell your butcher you intend to eat it raw.


14

You can have raw chicken in restaurants in Japan - it's delicious. Depending on where you live there may be better or worse food safety standards, but there is nothing poisonous about raw chicken itself. By the way, sushi is a dish with vinegary rice. The raw-meat dish is Sashimi http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sashimi. A picture of chicken sashimi You ...


14

Butchered meat is generally sterile except on its exterior. (That doesn't mean parasite- or botulism-free, but it's a start.) Get the best quality you can from a source you trust. Keep it at as low a temperature as possible, and don't expose it to warm air for more than the few minutes it takes to prepare. Cut with a clean knife on a clean surface. Put ...


13

If you are really nervous, a trick I have heard of is to start with a really thick piece of beef. Then sear it on both sides in a hot pan. At this point the outside would be deemed safe and the interior is typically safe so you cut away the cooked parts. Then proceed to make the steak tartare with the still raw inside part. As a bonus those nice browned ...


12

I agree with both rumtscho and James Barrie on some points. First off, modern bacon that is "smoked" just might ONLY have smoke ADDED as a flavoring and not "be" smoked, OR not smoked for as long a period of time. While adding salt and chemical preservatives will enhance the shelf life it will not inherently kill ALL bacteria (see below for more ...


12

If it's really really really fresh chicken that's been well-raised and well-handled, sure you can eat it raw. As has been mentioned, chicken sashimi is not unknown. The same applies to pork, another meat we're usually taught to cook thoroughly (historical associations there - pork was long known as a carrier of worms if not properly cooked, but this is less ...


12

Beef (and Lamb): The surface of beef is often contaminated with pathogens such as e-coli. However, the meat is very dense and the bacteria cannot migrate from the surface into the flesh. Therefore, beef is safe to consume once the external temperature exceeds, 160 degrees F. The internal uncontaminated meat is safe to eat raw. Pork: Like beef the surface of ...


11

Technically or practically? Technically, it's not the best idea. The purpose of thawing is to bring the meat above 32 degrees but not above 40. (Bringing it to room temperature is a separate process, done only immediately prior to cooking). In a refrigerator, the temperature is probably between 35-45 degrees, so there's no problem. On the counter, ...


10

The thing to remember, vis a vis bacterial contamination, is that it's almost always the OUTSIDE of the meat that's contaminated, not the inside. With pork and chicken you're worried about an internal parasite/bacteria, which is why they're not cooked rare. With beef, if it's grade A, it's good to go, and most everything you buy in the grocery store is ...


10

If it is sealed in an air tight container and the freezer always stays very cold so the meat never thaws- then chicken and beef will stay good indefinitely. I have used both chicken and beef that had been frozen in my deep freezer at 0F for years with no ill effect. I can't speak for shrimp as I have no personal experience but I would expect it to be the ...


8

In this thread goblinbox makes a disturbing contribution that references a Consumer Reports article stating that 83% of US chickens are contaminated with salmonella and campylobacter. That's a high enough percentage to scare me away. Is raw chicken even appetizing to you? The thought of eating chicken sushi makes me queasy, but that just could be because ...


8

It seems the meat is not farmed at all but entirely "harvested" in the wild http://www.daff.gov.au/agriculture-food/meat-wool-dairy/ilg/industries/kangaroos. So it should be treated as a game meat rather than a farmed one - i.e. best to cook it. Here's advice from the Department of Primary Industries saying you should never feed raw kangaroo to your dog, ...


8

You can use the same board (I often do), but you must wash it in hot, soapy water in-between. Usually there is plenty of time to do this while the meat is cooking. Because bacteria grows exponentially, I'd recommend washing the board soon, even if you aren't going to reuse it, to prevent accidental cross-contamination. If you're using one meat board, you ...


7

As I recall from all my food safety training: to properly wash your hands, wet them with warm water (at least 100 F), apply soap, scrub all over your hands and in between your fingers for 20 seconds and rinse. That should thoroughly remove the bad bacteria and any other debris clinging to your hands. That should be all you need.


7

Assuming this is a meat fondue (AKA fondue bourguignonne), using oil instead of cheese: There is no best or correct oil to use - each type of oil has its own characteristic flavour. However, a meat fondue generally involves heating the oil to 350-400° F (175-200° C), so you'll want to treat this more or less like deep-frying and use an oil with a ...


7

It has more to do with the industrial food system. If it's coming out of industrial agriculture, I don't think I'd eat any meat raw. If you can find a good local producer that does its own slaughtering, cleaning and packaging you could ask them about it. Their meat might be safe to eat raw. It just depends on where it comes from. My rule of thumb is: if ...


7

You are really tempting fate. Unless your cold water was below 40f (which is doubtful), you have effectively replicated a bacteria culture for 7 hours. Since it's in an oxygen-free environment, your likely bug would be clostridium botulinum. When your food's surface temperature rises above 40f, or drops below 130f, the safety clock starts ticking. Rule ...


7

Chicken meat and eggs carry the risk of salmonella. Salmonella are bacteria which cause severe symptoms, and can even end in death, unlike other, milder types of food poisoning. They are also hardy bacteria, and the temperature needed for them to die quickly is above the temperature for medium rare. In theory, you could eat poultry medium rare if you ensure ...


7

Almost any cut of meat can be pounded--very thin steaks commonly called cutlets or scallopini are made from tender cuts being pounded thin. This is most often done with chicken or pork, but you will also find, for example, medallions of beef tenderloin pounded to get them into a uniform shape and size. Obviously, this is work to do, and changes the ...


6

TLDR; If you defrosted the chicken in the fridge, go ahead and refreeze it. If you thawed it on the counter, cook it, then freeze it. I was always taught: DO NOT REFREEZE uncooked meat! But, I did a search and found this somewhat contradictory statement from a reliable source: "Refreezing Once food is thawed in the refrigerator, it is safe to refreeze ...


6

They were in the danger zone of 40 to 140 degrees for more than 4 hours. If you were in restaurant, you would have to discard them. Sadly, I recommend the same at home.


5

Well, I usually add quite a lot of fresh lemon juice on it. This acid environment should kill most pathogens. However, you have to use the most fresh meat possible, when I eat raw meat (very common in Italy) I eat it the same day I bought it from the butcher. Tell to your family butcher that you're going to do carpaccio (or generically that you will eat it ...


5

It it's not for immediate cooking, defrost in the fridge. The rule of thumb is for a piece of meat to spend no more than 4 hours (cumulative) in the danger zone (above 40 degrees F). A thin piece of steak won't take that long to defrost, so it's relatively safe to defrost on the counter and then cook immediately. A big roast or chicken on the other hand, has ...


5

Commercial kitchens use a few methods that are hidden from the camera during kitchen shows. First, there are cutting boards for meats, and separate cutting boards for vegetables. These are often color coded so they aren't mixed up. If there is room, raw meats use an entirely different table. Any possibly contaminated board is sanitized before reuse. Second, ...


4

No no no no. Bag idea. Don't defrost on the counter. Like a lot of people said already, 40-100 degrees exponentially causes bacteria growth. Yes proper cooking can kill a lot of bacteria, but nothing is guaranteed. Besides, certain types of toxins (eg spores) are produced by bacteria and aren't destroyed by heat, only way to prevent is to not allow ...


4

Use fresh beef that has been properly stored and handled. The natural state of beef is generally sterile, external pathogens are introduced in processing and multiply quickly on the beef. A good butcher who maintains a clean environment significantly decreases the chances of contamination. Keeping the beef cold until eaten slows the reproduction of any ...



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