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17

I discussed a similar subject in this question: What exactly is "Sushi Grade" fish? Raw fish isn't safe to eat if it's just been sitting around. However, the raw fish used in sushi/sashimi has been frozen (typically flash-frozen) in order to kill any parasites, making it as safe as any other food. Most distributors of sashimi also have their own methods ...


16

To make cookie dough to eat raw you have a couple of choices: Leave the eggs out Use pasteurized eggs I'm not sure how Ben and Jerry's make theirs, but I suspect it is by pasteurizing at some point in the manufacturing process. Leaving the egg(s) out is the simplest method and doesn't make a big difference in the final product (when you are not going to ...


13

You're going to have more issues with cookie-spreading than anything else, because your fat is going to get all warm. If you have a lot of fat in your cookies, you're definitely going to want to put the dough back in the fridge. If the dough is a hard dough, and you don't expect your cookies to significantly change shape during cooking, I wouldn't worry ...


11

Welcome to the site Tomas. Sashimi is actually a Japanese delicacy. It's quite simple because it's just raw seafood, that has been sliced into bite-sized pieces. It is typically served with soy sauce and wasabi paste. Pickled ginger is also served as a palate cleanser between bites. There really isn't a "recipe" to speak of, you simply buy really fresh "...


11

Lentils are good for a long time: Many claim that they stay safe "indefinitively". While that is clearly an exaggeration, properly stored lentils stay edible for years if you keep them well-sealed in a cool, dry and dark(-ish) place. Note that dry storage keeps mold at bay, closed jars protect from insect damage and cool temperatures slow trace amounts of ...


10

Paneer can be used as is. Sometimes it is fried to extend shelf life. Cooks will also sometimes fry paneer until it is slightly brown and then put the fried cubes of paneer in hot water for a few minutes. This makes paneer very soft. If you do cook paneer, it will not melt, like most other cheese varieties, because it's an acid-set cheese.


10

Yes, that's fine. You're going to cook everything to a much higher temp than the minimum safe temperature for the meat that requires the highest temperature. That's the key, and your plans are far beyond what is minimally required for safety.


8

An oyster has three key components that you want to be aware of when accenting their flavor: salinity, texture, and finish. Oysters are naturally salty since their blood is basically seawater. Depending on where the oysters are from they can vary rather significantly in salinity, from 12 to 36 parts per thousand. Oysters from northern colder waters are ...


8

If the honey has always had a water content below ~18% and is continuously stored in a sealed container (for instance a glass jar), it is perfectly safe to eat as long as you are over 1 year old. In fact, pasteurized honey is inferior in quality. The pollen and spores will remain in there either way, even if they're dead and can only be removed by (expensive)...


7

The website specifically says : All of our salame are cured and naturally aged. Other salumi items like our Mortadella are spiced and cooked in the Italian tradition. The problem is that there are two classifications of meat that only vary by a letter: Salami (the plural of salame) are cured, air-dried meats. They can be stored at room temperature (...


7

As I explained in another question recently, there is no meaningful answer to this. There is no way to make the prediction "you have a X percent chance of infection per parasite infested meal". Instead of predicting it mathematically, we could feed people infected fish and measure it, but as far as I am aware, no ethical board will approve that experiment. ...


6

As mentioned in this question about raw chicken - some people and cultures do indeed eat raw chicken. Notwithstanding that, to answer your question more directly, the main problem with eating raw meat, fish, or anything else, are bacteria, parasites and other pathogens. A healthy animal, however, butchered appropriately, should have no specific issues. As ...


6

There is probably still some risk, so I wouldn't assume it was safe; however, ice-cream is frozen, so I wouldn't worry about ice-cream at all, unless the egg-mixture was left at room temperature for a significant time before freezing. As far as I know, salmonella is in the faeces of the chicken, if present. Some faeces will often stick to the shell. In very ...


6

Ideally, you'd store all meat tightly wrapped and/or in air-tight containers. Further, you'd store the meat on the bottom shelf of the fridge, and the ready-to-eat food above it—just in case the meat leaks juices out, it won't be able to drip onto the ready-to-eat foods. That's perfectly safe, and indeed is what's required in a commercial fridge. The idea ...


5

Well, I am Indian, so let me tell you this: in traditional North-Indian cooking (and this is where paneer is widely used), paneer is almost always cooked. Yes, no problem with not cooking it, but uncooked paneer is not a good dish. It is more a dry and stingy (for lack of a better word) cheese. So you see paneer or cottage cheese is best served cooked and ...


5

As far as I know, shrimp paste is ground shrimp fermented with a lot of salt. You may have a hard time replicating this exactly with easy-to-find vegan ingredients, but I think what might work well as a substitute is a mixture of miso and dried seawead or kelp powder. The seaweed would give you the fishy taste and the miso - which is salted, fermented ...


5

No, you can not safely eat it. See answers to "Can I safely cook a steak that was left out raw for 7 hours". Thawing at room temperature in air allows the surface to reach and maintain an unsafe temperature for some time, even as the interior remains quite frozen. The appropriate ways to thaw the roasts are to do it in the fridge, or fully immersed in a ...


4

I've never worked with wild hare, but I know that Hank Shaw's site, http://honest-food.net, is a good source for game recipes, and instructions on breaking them down. Here is a good starting point for hare: http://honest-food.net/wild-game/rabbit-hare-squirrel-recipes/


4

It does not have to be cooked. It's cheese!


4

How to deal with a freshly shot hare. Immediately it is shot, or as soon as possible thereafter, take hold of the carcase between the rear legs hold the legs downwards and apply pressure with both thumbs between the legs on the bladder to expel any urine onto the ground. This will stop stale urine tainting the meat. Do not paunch the hare. Leave the ...


4

Wash everything in very hot water, with dish soap, and rinse thoroughly. Unless there are at risk people in your home, this should be sufficient. If you are very concerned, you can make a sanitizing agent by diluting bleach. The ratio would be about 1 tablespoon of bleach to one gallon of water, per this Oklahoma State University shared from UC Davis: ...


4

This list is probably the extensive I've seen on the Internet with some scientific accuracy behind it. A more condensed list with great references at the bottom can also be found here. The numbers seem to jive with my own experience, especially in the high variance of some of the foods. As some of the commentators alluded to, if you are looking for ...


4

If you're in the US, you are likely to be inspected. The inspector will use a thermometer to make sure that the chicken is being stored below 40F (4.5C). That is the FDA requirement as well. You may or may not need a refrigerator, it sounds to me that first you need a thermometer.


4

There is a lot of ambiguous and misused terminology in cooking... added to that, different countries have specific legal definitions for foodstuffs that vary from one jurisdiction to another. Gammon vs. Ham Some sources call it gammon if it is raw, while others claim gammon differs from ham because it is cured with the belly and then detached, whereas hams ...


4

I did a little bit of digging on the topic and found this TapTrip blog post: A brief history of Sushi: why do japanese eat raw fish? It also references a Cultura Bunka article in Spanish called Uma breve história do sushi. To quote: During Muromachi Period (1336-1573), japaneses [sic] used to transport the raw fish inside of baked rice to keep it ...


3

This steak should be discarded immediately, See: Why is it dangerous to eat meat which has been left out and then cooked? While freezing will halt the growth, the pathogens have already had more than enough time to create poisons, some of which are not destroyed by freezing or cooking. Also, it probably will now taste quite off, but that is not a safety ...


3

Short answer:no, has to do with exponential growth and also individual sensitivities. Long answer: You only need a few bacteria to make you sick. And bacteria grow exponentially. Let's assume that eating up to N1 bacteria won't do anything, N2 bacteria will give you a light fever, and N3 bacteria will send you to hospital. And N3 is a very low number. ...


3

You've pretty much answered your own question. Put the PB in a blender, drizzle in a little peanut oil, blitz and season to taste with salt and a little sugar if you want it. I'd add them all slowly: you can always add, you can't take away.


3

I didnt think paneer melts. You can boil it and boil it in a curry and it still maintains its shape. But you can eat it raw! :-)


3

I recently had some at a winery restaurant where they were topped with a tiny bit of icewine jelly. That worked extraordinarily well - subtle enough to still get the full oyster flavour, but the sweet aftertaste of the icewine also provided enough contrast with the salinity to make it interesting.



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