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16

I discussed a similar subject in this question: What exactly is "Sushi Grade" fish? Raw fish isn't safe to eat if it's just been sitting around. However, the raw fish used in sushi/sashimi has been frozen (typically flash-frozen) in order to kill any parasites, making it as safe as any other food. Most distributors of sashimi also have their own methods ...


13

You're going to have more issues with cookie-spreading than anything else, because your fat is going to get all warm. If you have a lot of fat in your cookies, you're definitely going to want to put the dough back in the fridge. If the dough is a hard dough, and you don't expect your cookies to significantly change shape during cooking, I wouldn't worry ...


11

Welcome to the site Tomas. Sashimi is actually a Japanese delicacy. It's quite simple because it's just raw seafood, that has been sliced into bite-sized pieces. It is typically served with soy sauce and wasabi paste. Pickled ginger is also served as a palate cleanser between bites. There really isn't a "recipe" to speak of, you simply buy really fresh ...


9

Paneer can be used as is. Sometimes it is fried to extend shelf life. Cooks will also sometimes fry paneer until it is slightly brown and then put the fried cubes of paneer in hot water for a few minutes. This makes paneer very soft. If you do cook paneer, it will not melt, like most other cheese varieties, because it's an acid-set cheese.


8

An oyster has three key components that you want to be aware of when accenting their flavor: salinity, texture, and finish. Oysters are naturally salty since their blood is basically seawater. Depending on where the oysters are from they can vary rather significantly in salinity, from 12 to 36 parts per thousand. Oysters from northern colder waters are ...


7

If the honey has always had a water content below ~18% and is continuously stored in a sealed container (for instance a glass jar), it is perfectly safe to eat as long as you are over 1 year old. In fact, pasteurized honey is inferior in quality. The pollen and spores will remain in there either way, even if they're dead and can only be removed by ...


6

Healthier is a loaded word in this case. The raw milk camp claims a richer flavor, more nutrients, and less allergies. The pasteurized camp claims just as nutritious, with better texture, but safer. Once all the practicalities of producing, distributing, and ensuring the quality of large quantities of milk come into play, the debate becomes fierce. What ...


6

There is probably still some risk, so I wouldn't assume it was safe; however, ice-cream is frozen, so I wouldn't worry about ice-cream at all, unless the egg-mixture was left at room temperature for a significant time before freezing. As far as I know, salmonella is in the faeces of the chicken, if present. Some faeces will often stick to the shell. In very ...


6

Ideally, you'd store all meat tightly wrapped and/or in air-tight containers. Further, you'd store the meat on the bottom shelf of the fridge, and the ready-to-eat food above it—just in case the meat leaks juices out, it won't be able to drip onto the ready-to-eat foods. That's perfectly safe, and indeed is what's required in a commercial fridge. The idea ...


6

The website specifically says : All of our salame are cured and naturally aged. Other salumi items like our Mortadella are spiced and cooked in the Italian tradition. The problem is that there are two classifications of meat that only vary by a letter: Salami (the plural of salame) are cured, air-dried meats. They can be stored at room temperature ...


5

No, you can not safely eat it. See answers to "Can I safely cook a steak that was left out raw for 7 hours". Thawing at room temperature in air allows the surface to reach and maintain an unsafe temperature for some time, even as the interior remains quite frozen. The appropriate ways to thaw the roasts are to do it in the fridge, or fully immersed in a ...


5

I used to drink raw milk. 20 minutes after it was "extracted". It was the best milk I ever had. The key here is finding a trustworthy source. Just like with any other food it should not be contaminated with harmful bacteria. And like pasteurized milk - you'll get cottage cheese if you let it sit unrefrigerated. Also some countries/states have laws about ...


5

As mentioned in this question about raw chicken - some people and cultures do indeed eat raw chicken. Notwithstanding that, to answer your question more directly, the main problem with eating raw meat, fish, or anything else, are bacteria, parasites and other pathogens. A healthy animal, however, butchered appropriately, should have no specific issues. As ...


5

Well, I am Indian, so let me tell you this: in traditional North-Indian cooking (and this is where paneer is widely used), paneer is almost always cooked. Yes, no problem with not cooking it, but uncooked paneer is not a good dish. It is more a dry and stingy (for lack of a better word) cheese. So you see paneer or cottage cheese is best served cooked and ...


5

As far as I know, shrimp paste is ground shrimp fermented with a lot of salt. You may have a hard time replicating this exactly with easy-to-find vegan ingredients, but I think what might work well as a substitute is a mixture of miso and dried seawead or kelp powder. The seaweed would give you the fishy taste and the miso - which is salted, fermented ...


4

It does not have to be cooked. It's cheese!


4

I've never worked with wild hare, but I know that Hank Shaw's site, http://honest-food.net, is a good source for game recipes, and instructions on breaking them down. Here is a good starting point for hare: http://honest-food.net/wild-game/rabbit-hare-squirrel-recipes/


4

Wash everything in very hot water, with dish soap, and rinse thoroughly. Unless there are at risk people in your home, this should be sufficient. If you are very concerned, you can make a sanitizing agent by diluting bleach. The ratio would be about 1 tablespoon of bleach to one gallon of water, per this Oklahoma State University shared from UC Davis: ...


4

This list is probably the extensive I've seen on the Internet with some scientific accuracy behind it. A more condensed list with great references at the bottom can also be found here. The numbers seem to jive with my own experience, especially in the high variance of some of the foods. As some of the commentators alluded to, if you are looking for ...


3

This steak should be discarded immediately, See: Why is it dangerous to eat meat which has been left out and then cooked? While freezing will halt the growth, the pathogens have already had more than enough time to create poisons, some of which are not destroyed by freezing or cooking. Also, it probably will now taste quite off, but that is not a safety ...


3

You've pretty much answered your own question. Put the PB in a blender, drizzle in a little peanut oil, blitz and season to taste with salt and a little sugar if you want it. I'd add them all slowly: you can always add, you can't take away.


3

I didnt think paneer melts. You can boil it and boil it in a curry and it still maintains its shape. But you can eat it raw! :-)


3

I'll assume it is skinned and cleaned already. I would discard the organs and make a stew with it. Chop it into pieces (bigger than bite-size is fine--you don't really want bone fragments) and simmer it in broth on low heat until tender. Probably the meat will be rather tough, so this cooking method will do well to make keep it moist and as tender as ...


3

I recently had some at a winery restaurant where they were topped with a tiny bit of icewine jelly. That worked extraordinarily well - subtle enough to still get the full oyster flavour, but the sweet aftertaste of the icewine also provided enough contrast with the salinity to make it interesting.


3

Raw leeks are quite strong and will mellow if cooked, so get it up to temperature for awhile and see where you get. I suspect that will get you much of the way there. If not, some mild acidity will help, adding a squeeze of lemon juice may do it for you.


3

The answer is simple: your test batches were less airy, and more dense. The heat from the oil was likely unable to penetrate the dough as effectively and cook the interior. If the recipe turned out properly the first time around, that's probably not the issue. If your concern is with storing the doughnuts (though how you would have any left is a mystery ...


2

The advantage with the raw milk is since there is no heat applied, you do not lose any nutritional value. I cannot tell you about the health side though. If you are not drinking pasteurized milk you have to make sure of the source of the raw milk. Also, note that, there are two types of pasteurization, there is the normal pasteurization where the milk is ...


2

What Zepplock said. If you know it came from healthy cows, recently, and was well cared for in the interim, then it's great stuff. Otherwise, you're essentially picking up a random petri dish and drinking it. Good luck with that...


2

Sushi isn't 100% safe, but it's reasonably safe (I eat it all the time). Different animals can harbor different diseases. Chicken are known to carry salmonella, which is pretty harmful to humans. Compare this to most types of sushi grade fish, which don't carry diseases as harmful. This is also a matter of preparation. "Sushi Grade" fish is prepared very ...


2

In my experience, whether or not you peel a fruit or vegetable has more to do with how easy it is to digest than any level of toxins. If you're going into the realm of herbs, however, then you need to be more careful, as some are quite potent. But as long as we're sticking to fruits and veggies, here's my advice, and it's pretty simple: Clearly things like ...



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