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16

The simple answer is: You reduce a cream sauce the same way you reduce any other sauce, by simmering it until a certain amount of liquid is gone, just like the instructions said. You have to be careful about temperature though, because milk (or cream) can burn at high temperatures, and then your sauce is ruined. You should keep it to a low or at most ...


10

Yes, cooking it more to evaporate off some of the liquid will definitely help. This is called reducing a sauce. A moderate simmer would be the appropriate temperature. You want to see occasional bubbles but definitely not a rolling boil. Stir it occasionally, making sure to get the bottom of the pot to avoid any scorching. It is possible to have it be quite ...


6

Your question makes me think of demi-glace. From your question, I would say that you're trying to get a nice shiny thick sauce for your duck, one that tastes of red wine. If that's your goal, I would recommend you Reduce your stock down until it's about the total volume of liquid that you're going to want. The stock reduction should be roughly the ...


5

There are a few things you can do to thicken your sauce: Simmer - you can simmer the sauce at a low heat for quite a long time without affecting the flavour (generally improves it). Many Bolognese sauces are simmered for 30+ minutes. Thicken - add 1-2 tbsp of corn starch (or flour tempered). Many commercial sauces do this. Add paste - add a small tin of ...


5

I have to wonder if you are using a wooden utensil to 'scrape the meat remnants'. If so, stop using wood. The wood will char and leave bits in your sauce, creating the bitterness. Try slowing down the process a bit and using less heat, at least initially as you deglaze the pan. The graininess could be charred bits of food which are burned before they are ...


5

I've sometimes made small reductions in the microwave. Just put the liquid in a much deeper container than it fits in so it doesn't make a mess, and run it on 50% power, check every 30 seconds or so until it is reduced to the degree you need.


4

You can search for a recipe using "red wine garlic steak sauce". To invent your own, start with your main ingredients. Pour some red wine into a bowl. Mince some garlic and add it. Add a pinch of salt. Take a good smell. Use a spoon to taste it (before adding to the meat obviously). Smell some of your other spices. Pick one that smells good with the sauce ...


4

I think that you should strain your reduction through either a coffe filter or cheese cloth, if you have it. That would take care of the little bits of food still in ther and leave you with a clear smooth reduction. The other issue that you mentioned is that the reduction is left tasting bitter. This would most likely be a result of your fonde being burned ...


3

WOW...this is a published recipe?? Are Pyrex casserole dishes safe for use on electric stovetops? It is very dangerous to put most bakeware on most stoves. Your best option would be to either originally bake in a stove-safe implement, or to transfer from a casserole to a saucepan at that point. Only, only use cookware labeled as safe for a stove (usually ...


3

If this is a full duck, I would suggest doing 1qt of stock, 1 bottle of wine and reduce it by half. For the wine may I suggest a Chianti as well as it should go great with your duck. Since you will be slowly reducing this sauce and for a learning experience every 5 minutes give it a taste. This will help you when you make other sauces to gauge times and ...


2

Personally, when using red wine and/or garlic with steak, I'd probably include shallots (careful with the amount if you're also using garlic) and rosemary. I also like celery salt, which I feel is pretty underused by most cooks. edit: I've used this recipe before and was pleased with the result: ...


2

My hunch would be if you want to play it safe, it might make sense to reduce first so you can taste it and make sure it's about the flavor you want in sweetness. Then you can add slowly while testing the sauce. Keep in mind that you'll probably reduce the sauce further, so it's like adding too much salt too early in a sauce and having the end result be too ...


2

A normal frying pan would probably work just fine for you. If you use a non-stick pan you'll tend to get less crisping on whatever you're cooking and if you plan to deglaze to make your sauce you'll get less yummy bits to work with. However, I've used non-stick cookware to make a lot of things (porkchops in white wine sauce, yum!) and it usually turns out ...


2

I think that your problem doesn't come from using the wrong cut, but from using the wrong quality tier of meat. The cheapest pork in the supermarket, no matter which cut, is produced from cheap mass-held pigs with a certain type of "lifestyle" - no movement opportunities, cheap feed, lots of antibiotica. It produces a certain kind of meat, known as PSE ...


1

The extended reduction could be destroying or driving off some of the volatile, organic compounds that give the wine its flavor. Wine can contain literally thousands of aromatic and flavorful chemicals from the specific variety of grape and the winemaking process (see http://www.winegeeks.com/articles/93 for a good article that balances geeky and ...


1

There is no single answer to this; it depends on the context and the intent of the recipe in which the reduction is being performed. Most reductions are expressed as a very approximate percentage, such as "reduce by about half" or "reduce by about two thirds." Sometimes, you may specify a target amount if that is what is important. "Reduce to about 1 ...


1

The most important reason reductions exist, is because they intensify the flavour, so that's the first point you should pay attention to. Will the flavour accommodate the rest of the dish? White wine is often used in reductions for fish, red wine more often for meat. Everything that you think will fit, can be a good fit (other (stronger) liquors, vinegars ...


1

Beware of hard boiling tomato sauce. Once it starts to thicken it'll burn to the bottom of the pot if not stirred every few minutes. That'll impart a 'Carbon-ara' taste that most people don't like. Dried mushrooms, Shiitake or other, such as you can get cheaply in asian food stores, make an excellent thickening agent for tomato sauces. They hydrate in 10 ...


1

Your pan was not very hot when you poured in the cream, and then you kept the temperature low per the low simmer instructions; that's why it took forever. Bring it to a boil on high heat first, then bring it down, and it will reduce in under ten minutes.


1

Just speaking generally, why would reducing less liquid be more of an issue if you watch the heat? It would probably reduce very quickly, like in 2-3 minutes on low-medium heat.


1

Personally I've made small quantities like that without burning them. It's easier if you use the smallest pan you have. Using a smaller pan gets the liquid more to a depth you'd expect from a larger amount in a larger pan.


1

If you're trying to cook away the alcohol, you'll need to reduce the wine first, and then add the stock, and reduce further. Mixing the two together first, or reducing the stock first will not remove as much alcohol, although it may be that you prefer having the alcohol in there.



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