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24

How about using orange zest instead of the juice? That way you'll get a lot of the aroma and flavor we think of as "orange" without really changing the sweetness or acidity.


19

The whole thing should've been done with the lid off. Any time you're reducing a sauce, you want the steam (moisture) to escape. As for 'how thick', the standard test is 'coats the back of a spoon'. If you stir with a spoon, you should be able to lift the spoon out vertically, and the sauce doesn't immediately drip off of it. This test also lets you ...


18

The simple answer is: You reduce a cream sauce the same way you reduce any other sauce, by simmering it until a certain amount of liquid is gone, just like the instructions said. You have to be careful about temperature though, because milk (or cream) can burn at high temperatures, and then your sauce is ruined. You should keep it to a low or at most ...


10

You might try zesting the orange, reducing the juice a bit, and then adding the zest to the syrup and then cooking it down a bit more. You may or may not wish to strain it after letting the zest cook for a minute or so. If you do this, take care. I believe cooking it too long will make the zest overly bitter. Alternatively, you could use frozen orange ...


10

Yes, cooking it more to evaporate off some of the liquid will definitely help. This is called reducing a sauce. A moderate simmer would be the appropriate temperature. You want to see occasional bubbles but definitely not a rolling boil. Stir it occasionally, making sure to get the bottom of the pot to avoid any scorching. It is possible to have it be quite ...


9

First of all, people indeed often add some seasoning in the beginning, but are usually careful with the amount, especially with salt. Flavor-wise, you could add it at the end, after the reduction and be fine. However, salt can also affect the process of cooking. For instance, it can draw moisture out of some vegetables when frying them first, meaning that ...


7

There are a few things you can do to thicken your sauce: Simmer - you can simmer the sauce at a low heat for quite a long time without affecting the flavour (generally improves it). Many Bolognese sauces are simmered for 30+ minutes. Thicken - add 1-2 tbsp of corn starch (or flour tempered). Many commercial sauces do this. Add paste - add a small tin of ...


7

Your question makes me think of demi-glace. From your question, I would say that you're trying to get a nice shiny thick sauce for your duck, one that tastes of red wine. If that's your goal, I would recommend you Reduce your stock down until it's about the total volume of liquid that you're going to want. The stock reduction should be roughly the ...


7

You have a couple of solutions: Make it thicker with agar agar instead of starch Use something like jam or marmalade The latter might be to close of the sugary paste you dislike. However agar agar contrary to starch has a really wide range of thickening. You can just make things from a tiny bit thicker than water to jelly. More over the boiling needed ...


6

There's no rule that you have to drink your wine 24 hours after un-corking it, in fact some wines can taste better after 24 hours. 3 or 4 days is fine in many cases, and some wines are still drinkable a week after opening. This can be extended by refrigerating your wine after opening, white or red, you can get 2 weeks out of a bottle of wine if it's stored ...


5

I've sometimes made small reductions in the microwave. Just put the liquid in a much deeper container than it fits in so it doesn't make a mess, and run it on 50% power, check every 30 seconds or so until it is reduced to the degree you need.


5

I have to wonder if you are using a wooden utensil to 'scrape the meat remnants'. If so, stop using wood. The wood will char and leave bits in your sauce, creating the bitterness. Try slowing down the process a bit and using less heat, at least initially as you deglaze the pan. The graininess could be charred bits of food which are burned before they are ...


5

The only good way I know of to concentrate fresh orange juice and maintain the flavor is by removing the water. But not by heating it, as the heat will destroy the flavor. You need a vacuum distiller or freeze dryer for your orange juice. Pulling a vacuum will boil the juice at room temperature, removing the water without adding any heat.


5

There's another reason for not boiling liquids, besides the possibility of making a mess (boiling over) or ruining it (scorching, etc.). You actually reduce the amount of flavor by boiling. As Kenji explains on Serious Eats : But here's the deal: when simmering, water is not the only thing escaping. Ever notice how when you come home to a pot of sauce ...


4

I think that you should strain your reduction through either a coffe filter or cheese cloth, if you have it. That would take care of the little bits of food still in ther and leave you with a clear smooth reduction. The other issue that you mentioned is that the reduction is left tasting bitter. This would most likely be a result of your fonde being burned ...


4

WOW...this is a published recipe?? Are Pyrex casserole dishes safe for use on electric stovetops? It is very dangerous to put most bakeware on most stoves. Your best option would be to either originally bake in a stove-safe implement, or to transfer from a casserole to a saucepan at that point. Only, only use cookware labeled as safe for a stove (usually ...


4

The goal is to evaporate alcohol and concentrate flavor. If adding wine to a mirepoix, or sofrito...some sort of early stage aromatic vegetable... reduce the wine almost until the pan goes dry, but not dry enough to cause sticking or burning. The flavor will be absorbed into the vegetable and you are good to go. If there is another instance of wine ...


3

This is really down to both personal preference and experience. You know roughly how long you simmered this sauce for and that the consistency was too thin, so next time you know to simmer it for longer. It's impossible to give a more exact answer because there are too many variables: pan size and temperature, amount of liquid etc. The lid should always be ...


3

I've roasted vegetables to address the same issue; it definitely works for eggplant and squash. All you have to do is spread them out over a baking sheet or two (if they're piled up the moisture won't escape as well) and roast at say 425F until they're mostly cooked, a bit shrunken down, and obviously not as wet. Your idea of grilling should work fine too, ...


3

It's not necessarily a practical home kitchen answer, but rotary evaporators do this, by lowering the pressure over the liquid and circulating the liquid to increase surface area. There does exist a culinary vacuum rotary evaporator, for only $9,999.95 by special order! Note that it also captures the vapor to condense, because often the flavor you want is ...


3

We do a lot of sauces and never use a lid through any part of the process. No need for it at all. Thickness desired is pretty much up to you. Start the process at higher heat so the ingredient's are all blended well then slowly turn down the heat until you get a consistent low simmer. This usually takes about 1/2 hour of standing close by and stirring ...


3

If this is a full duck, I would suggest doing 1qt of stock, 1 bottle of wine and reduce it by half. For the wine may I suggest a Chianti as well as it should go great with your duck. Since you will be slowly reducing this sauce and for a learning experience every 5 minutes give it a taste. This will help you when you make other sauces to gauge times and ...


3

If you have enough time, you could make an orange extract. Just peel pieces of zest from several oranges (avoid the white pith) and soak them in vodka for a couple of weeks, then filter it. Then you could add it to the pan like wine, boiling off the alcohol (assuming you don't want alcohol in your sauce). You could also follow a homemade orange liqueur ...


3

As you pointed out, liquids reduce a lot faster when you crank up the heat compared to when you leave it at a gentle simmer. The reason is simply that you're introducing a lot more thermal energy into the liquid when you crank it up to the max. Once the liquid reaches the boiling point, any extra heat you provide will be canceled out by the cooling effect ...


3

If by "season" you mean salt, then add it after the reduction. Depending on the recipe, there are herbs and spices that you want to cook with the liquid. Reduction is the evaporation of water and does result in concentration of flavor...because of this it is very easy to get a result that is overly salty if you salt and then reduce.


3

You can' "cook off" acidity, but you can balance it. Typically in marinara, that is done with a small amount of sugar, or, better yet, half of a grated carrot per 28 oz can of tomatoes, sweated with your onion.


2

My hunch would be if you want to play it safe, it might make sense to reduce first so you can taste it and make sure it's about the flavor you want in sweetness. Then you can add slowly while testing the sauce. Keep in mind that you'll probably reduce the sauce further, so it's like adding too much salt too early in a sauce and having the end result be too ...


2

Beware of hard boiling tomato sauce. Once it starts to thicken it'll burn to the bottom of the pot if not stirred every few minutes. That'll impart a 'Carbon-ara' taste that most people don't like. Dried mushrooms, Shiitake or other, such as you can get cheaply in asian food stores, make an excellent thickening agent for tomato sauces. They hydrate in 10 ...


2

I think that your problem doesn't come from using the wrong cut, but from using the wrong quality tier of meat. The cheapest pork in the supermarket, no matter which cut, is produced from cheap mass-held pigs with a certain type of "lifestyle" - no movement opportunities, cheap feed, lots of antibiotica. It produces a certain kind of meat, known as PSE ...


2

You could put the container of food into a bigger closed container also containing a strong desiccant like zeolithe or silica gel - these will probably needed to be dried in a hot oven before use, but that has nothing to do with heating or not heating the food. Make sure the desiccant is kept from contacting the food directly. The desiccant will constantly ...



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