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21

It has nothing to do with the microwave and everything to do with the volatility of aromas and flavors in coffee. Even coffee kept warm for 4 hours won't taste very good. In my experience, stale brewed coffee results in a more pronounced acidity, if left out to cool, or a woody, muddy, bitter kind of flavor, sometimes with more pronounced acidity, if held ...


17

YES! If food is quickly heated and kept above 140F/60C, microorganisms can't grow in the food. Professional kitchens use steam tables to keep food warm at this temperature throughout a day's service. If the product is cooled quickly (generally using an ice bath), then it can be used for more than one day. Another approach is often used for stocks and ...


15

It's not going to be nice to drink a day later, no matter what. I'd use it in baking a chocolate cake or something like that instead, if you can't bear to throw it out. The problem is not just the reheating, which will further cook the coffee and affect flavour, but that it's been losing aroma and oxidizing for a day first. If you're serving it to anyone ...


15

It takes quite a while for a pot of hot soup to cool down to 40°F in the fridge. Several hours, sometimes, depending on the shape of the pot and the volume of soup. If you're heating and re-chilling the same soup daily, it's going to spend a lot of time in the danger zone. From a safety perspective, you'd be much better off making a pot of soup every few ...


12

In France, white button mushrooms are called champignons.  Before refrigeration was common, books suggested not to keep cooked mushrooms or reheat them, because undercooked mushrooms would quickly spoil.  If you cooked them and later keep them in the refrigerator, it is safe to reheat mushrooms.  Treat mushrooms as you would treat meat. Mushrooms are mainly ...


10

Sunflower lecithin (sorry, best link I could find) is gaining in popularity as an alternative to soy lecithin because it is widely perceived to have a neutral taste and actually has superior emulsifying properties. It's a little on the expensive side, though. Soy lecithin by itself doesn't taste horrible if you buy it as a food additive (as opposed to a ...


9

@Cos is right, a pizza stone is great - so is a pizza screen in the oven. If I don't want to heat up the oven (big oven, little piece of pizza aways seems like a waste), then a cast iron pan over medium heat on the stove with a lid does pretty well.


9

Because it is made from pastry dough. Pastry dough (and any other kind of dough) gets ruined by a microwave. See this question for details of what will probably happen. The only exceptions for dough in the microwave is pasta (which is supposed to be boiled in water anyway) and some kinds of very soft batter, which can be eaten immediately as a "microwave ...


9

Much of the flavor and aroma of tea comes from volatile oils/compounds. The heat applied to tea leaves while steeping them is key to releasing those volatile compounds but when you reboil the tea, a large portion the flavor compounds in the water are likely just going to be vaporized. The end result is the reheated tea will have very little 'tea' flavor ...


8

easiest way is to mix it with the sauce and heat both up together. Usually I'd do this in a pan, but you could use a microwave. If you have to heat the pasta up on its own, what I usually do is do it in a pan and add a little boiling water, just a couple of tablespoons, enough to stop it sticking, and keep stirring until its warmed through. If it starts ...


8

I'd recommend letting it cool to near room-temperature, then place it in an airtight sealed plastic freezer bag before it dries out too much. You can spoon some of the juices from cooking into the bag with the steak so that when it defrosts again the juices will be in there working to keep it moist. When you defrost it, do so in your fridge leaving it ...


8

Here's a neat list of plastics & whether they're supposed to be microwave-safe or not: http://www.scn.org/~bk269/plastics.html


8

My preferred method by far would be heating them in a pot along with some kind of sauce. Failing that, I think I might try putting them in a tightly covered pot in the oven along with just a little water (just a tablespoon or so)--that would gently heat them and also keep them moist.


8

According to Spanish winemaker guru the Marqués de Griñón, you can safely warm a bottle of wine to serving temperature (12ºC-14ºC). Put the microwave at high for two seconds for every ºC you want to raise the temperature. Also here Edit: I looked up the reference in his book. It says to heat a bottle out of the fridge (where stored after opening) in the ...


8

They're meatballs. It's a crockpot. Why bother refrigerating them or cooking them in the oven? Just brown them in the oven under broil and then set the crockpot on low and cook them overnight in the sauce. They'll be perfectly done, perfectly safe, and delicious in the morning. A few extra hours won't hurt them at all and then you won't have to worry ...


7

The best advice I can give is that you're not going to want to use full power very often. I find that food tastes much better if you cook it for longer at 60 or 70% power then if you blast it quickly at 100%. This is especially true for proteins like chicken. I guess this allows for slightly slower, more even heating without destroying all the water in ...


7

Officially, its unsafe. This is largely due to the fact that the time spent in "the danger zone" is cumulative. You may be killing off bacteria, but during their lifespan they may release toxins and spores that you may not kill. Every time you reheat the bits of leftovers, they're adding up time in the 'danger zone'. Addionally, soup is only good in the ...


7

From an article entitled The Forgotten Inventor Of The Chicken Nugget on BusinessInsider.com Baker’s prototype nugget, developed with student Joseph Marshall, mastered two food-engineering challenges: keeping ground meat together without putting a skin around it, and keeping batter attached to the meat despite the shrinkage caused by freezing and the ...


6

Surprisingly, an egg is the most difficult thing to cook. McDonalds serves a lot of eggs in their breakfast menus and they haven't found a way yet to mass prefry / prcook these suckers. So I doubt this could be done. I tried half cooking scrambled eggs before and then finishing them off later, and the result was crap at best. I doubt you can do that with ...


6

It really depends on type of the fish you have there.. Option 1. best with Salmon It's easy for salmon. With Salmon, the asian way is to put the left over on a hot pan and lightly pan fire it. Cook it with some ginger and shallots. Add a mixture of soy sauce, salt, sugar and oyster sauce. It's a pretty dish with rice. Option 2. Put them in the oven for ...


6

I have always had the most satisfactory results from preheating the oven to 400F with a pizza stone and then setting the cold pizza on the hot stone for 8 to 10 minutes?


6

I haven't tried that, but in theory, a standard custard should be capable of rebaking. However, it will be a tricky matter, much trickier than the first baking. For example, the temperature at which certain proteins in the egg coagulate depends on the speed at which the egg is heated. As a side effect, it is much harder to get a good custard starting with ...


5

It'll never be the same as when it's new. The closest I've ever seen is a method often used for good bagels: put in paper bag with a bit of water and nuke it. Basically just reheat it with a lot of humidity.


5

For small amounts, I have good luck reheating pasta in the microwave with a little butter or your choice of sauce. The moist heat does a good job of allowing the starch granules to soften back up.


5

Reheating spinach can cause nitrite to be produced. Quote from eufic.org Spinach and other leafy vegetables contain high concentrations of nitrate. The amount depends on the variety, season, and the soil and water conditions where the vegetable was grown. Nitrate itself is totally harmless, but it can be converted to nitrites, and then to nitrosamines, ...


5

If you mean like a potpie or a TV dinner? Yes you're fine, go for it. If you're really worried about it here is the rule. (been a few years since I took serveSafe) When reheating foods you want the internal temperature to reach 165 degrees F. (74C) for 15 seconds. In practice (at home NOT at the restaurant) just get it nice and hot. Note: Homemade foods ...


5

The method I used in the past (which might not be the best way) is to lightly fry the food initially, drain it of all oils, and put it in the refridgerator until it is almost time to serve the large amount of food. Then you can finish deep frying the batches. The initial frying will dramatically reduce the time it takes to refry each batch. I found this was ...


5

No, it won't change the aroma compared to conventional heating. Generally, heating does change aroma. But it changes in the same way in conventional heating and in microwave heating (given that you heat to the same internal temperature, which can be very different time and power settings for different types of heating devices). What microwaves change is ...


5

This is a difficult question in part because you've listed so many things -- for instance, a cream sauce is going to be difficult, as cream sauces may break when frozen. Cooked chicken, on the other hand, I go quite frequently. But the thing with the chicken is that I'm cooking it to use as an ingredient in other things; I think you may have more success ...



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